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Garden picture exchange!

 
Mark Boucher
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Let's see if this works...
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Mark Boucher
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Cool! So, please post some pictures of your garden! Raised, hugel, urban, whatcha got? I'm wanting to transition my raised bed to a no-till type garden. I'm leaning towards direct seeding the approx. 10' x 30' area with a general diversity of veggies and cover, and staging seedings to fill in during the season. There's no wood under there, only mulch on top, but I've only scratched the surface minimally in the last two years, so I'm not sure if I want to dig it up. I've been reading at permies a lot, and think that this site is a great resource. I'm in Athens, GA, and have recently realized that something will grow here year-round... and so I'm trying to figure out a sustainable system that uses mostly seeding and cut-and-drop as the imputs, and harvesting, of course. I appreciate any advice, but would love to see any pictures of your gardens; lots of info in a picture! I hope that winter finds you well; the pic above is a little taste of spring.
 
Gail Moore
Posts: 175
Location: south central Appalachia, southwest Virginia, US zone 6/7
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Beautiful, Mark. You've invested your energy well.

I look forward to seeing others' endeavors. I'm in between garden spaces right now, so will post photos later...
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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Here is a picture from June. Hugelkultur beds were done in ground instead of being piled up on top.
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Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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How about a few flowers.
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Mark Boucher
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Looking good Alex. What's your mulching process? And thanks, Gail. I guess that's the good thing about investing energy; your back can't be sore forever, right?
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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Mark Boucher wrote:Looking good Alex. What's your mulching process? And thanks, Gail. I guess that's the good thing about investing energy; your back can't be sore forever, right?


Flower beds are under pine trees and the needles fall in the beds, as I studied the pattern of where the needles
fell and built the beds there. What misses the beds I rake up and put back in the beds. In my garden I use pine
needles in the paths and have been using wheat straw in the beds. I am having to buy the wheat straw, so going
forward, I will use leaves and pine needles on the beds as well, because that is what I have and can control.

My flower beds are unprotected from deer but I plant edibles like onion, garlic, rosemary, basil, cilantro in among the
flowers. Anything I think they might leave alone due to it's strong flavor or smell.
 
john giroux
Posts: 145
Location: Cumming, GA
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apple tree guild
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john giroux
Posts: 145
Location: Cumming, GA
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This is a trellis I made for a kiwi vine. Not the best photo,but there are 3 apple trees, granny smith, pink lady and red delicious, a few comfry plants, fennel artichokes, garlic, dill, sage,chickory, collards, mint, daisies, bee balm, chamomile, oats, wheat, plantains, dandelions, and various weeds and lots of creeping Bermuda grass. The whole area has lots of wood buried that I got from my property in different stages of decay. This spring I plan on adding more veggies and flowers to the mix and a cherry tree maybe. Also planted a few locust tree seeds. The bees are about 20 yards from this spot.
 
                        
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Full pics/details can be found on our blog...











Hope you enjoy!

-Bill, Melissa & Paige
 
garrett lacey
Posts: 72
Location: Edmonton Alberta
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Matthew Fallon
Posts: 308
Location: long island, ny Z-7a
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these are my raised/buried framed hybrid hugels. dug 3' deep til hit light clay subsoil , filled with logs,woodchips, horse manure,split/rotting firewood,sawdust,shavings,truckloads of grass etc.
frames are cedar fencing reused 3x over. 1 season old (2 this spring) grew like gangbusters.
thanks.
suburban hugelkultur beds



 
Kota Dubois
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My land has very shallow soil (for the most part) so I make pockets with whatever is available. Since learning the advantages of burying wood in them all my new ones (I have many) have started that way, and any of the old ones which need redoing will get wood too. It's impossible to get a decent picture of everything but this gives an idea.
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view from Colosseum to Sky Garden
 
Maryse Cloutier-Gelinas
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Location: Quebec
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I love this tread!!! More pictures please!!!
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1066
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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lovely thread, will contribute mid summer or so i think, depending on how things are looking then, just working on earthworks still so its kinda ugly if you will

also whats the website for your blog myers?
i love the wicker stuff
 
Brad Vietje
Posts: 66
Location: Newbury, VT (Zone 4)
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LOVE seeing all the abundance and life force in those lush, green pic's! Especially during a snow storm!

My HK beds are in the landscaping phase, and not even buried in soil yet, so I'll have some photos to share in a few months. I'll have to look on another computer for garden pix from last summer.
 
Mark Boucher
Posts: 13
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Wow! What some great gardens!
Matt Davey, I love the diversity. Are you getting lots of volunteers, or are you mostly seeding/planting?
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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Just to keep the thread moving, another picture.
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Patrick Mann
Posts: 302
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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Myers Family wrote:Full pics/details can be found on our blog...Hope you enjoy!

-Bill, Melissa & Paige


Please post a link to your blog. I'd love to see more of the willow structures.
 
                        
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http://ourcascadia.blogspot.com/

it is made using alder saplings... not willow. we had a few thousand of them to clear so we put them to use.

-bill

Patrick Mann wrote:
Myers Family wrote:Full pics/details can be found on our blog...Hope you enjoy!

-Bill, Melissa & Paige


Please post a link to your blog. I'd love to see more of the willow structures.
 
Patrick Mann
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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Myers Family wrote:http://ourcascadia.blogspot.com/

it is made using alder saplings... not willow. we had a few thousand of them to clear so we put them to use.

-bill


Really nice work. Looks like you built a temporary 2x4 frame to support the work in progress and removed it afterwards? Is there any foundation or are they just resting on the ground?
 
Matt Smith
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Excellent pictures, all. Kota your picture looks like an oasis.
 
                        
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There are 4 corner posts set and buried in the ground. The 2x4 frame supported the top during construction and was removed afterwards.

Full credit should be given to our volunteers who made it happen... specifically Matt Donaldson who spent the summer with us and now lives in Portland, OR.
 
Kota Dubois
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Thanks Matt. We call our place The Anomaly, after an episode of Star Trek TNG, where they find an M-class planet that only has one square of green life on it. When I'm there I tend to think of it as the Centre of the Universe.
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The Voyeur
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Sky Garden
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Three Sisters and a Cousin
 
Kota Dubois
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Oh, what the heck, people have been warned this is a picture thread. Sorry to waste your bandwidth.
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view up to the Sky Garden
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Wet Rock Gardens
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Sunrise above it all
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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Thanks for posting Kota and others this shows the reality of all the talk.
 
Marianne Cicala
gardener
Pie
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Location: south central VA 7B
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bee books forest garden fungi solar trees
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Here are a couple~ love this - thanks!!!
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~friends with benes~
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Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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Can't wait for these guys to show up this year!
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Pat Redd
Posts: 6
Location: South Oregon Coast
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Here's my first attempt at a hugelkulture bed. It's 90% complete, I just ran out of energy for covering the last of it up...
I found a bunch of fantastic mycelium and molds on the rotting logs I used...was wondering if anyone would be able to put a name on some of these interesting looking spores. Also there is what looks like droplets of sap on the end of a log that's been in contact with the ground for a good five years...(so it's probably not tree sap)
http://solarbeez.com/2013/02/17/hugelkulture/
I looked for a web site that might be able to ID mushroom spore, but didn't find anything. That's why I wanted some more knowledgeable people to weigh in on it.
Thanks,
Pat
 
                  
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Love the pics, so inspirational!!
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1066
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 382
Location: South West France
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Terrace looking towards the gloriette and root cellar with Chilean potato vine in flower


The Wisteria brachybotrys 'Shiro Kapitan Fuji' is flowering on the terrace


On top of the root cellar


Very well behaved chickens


Dense planting between the oak, peach and plum trees


Pumpkin, peaches, goats and chicken




 
Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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Back lit garden.
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Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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This thread needs a bump. There are a lot of good ideas that are easier to show than tell.
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Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3662
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
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A few of the wild things in Wyoming.
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Angela Baker
Posts: 14
Location: Portland, OR
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This thread is like a ray of sunshine. Beautiful gardens, everyone!

having difficulty uploading garden photos from our FB page, so here's the link:

Salt of the Earth Urban Farm
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 382
Location: South West France
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Sloe gin time !


Still picking peppers.


Chicken feast, one Amaranth plant at a time

 
Alex Ames
Posts: 399
Location: Georgia
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How dumb does it sound to say that France sure does look....French. It does, even the goats and chickens
look French or is it my imagination?
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1066
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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^well Alex, I may have to agree with you that chicken looks pretty french lol

great pics though, makes me want amaranth now... i was kinda on the fence b4
 
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