Find intentional communities that match your values in your area with this free resource!
[Logo] permies
  Search | home | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies | World Domination!
Register / Login


Search Results: 365 records were found
permies » forums
. The bulb costs about $8, can fit some regular lamps or a $10 heat lamp fixture.

Take winter walks. Human bodies can adapt a little, so experiencing winter can help you be comfortable with less heat
??  Sorry forgot to say we have all electric and we do have led bulbs in light fixtures and most cooking is done on stove top..not oven!  Thanks!!

The advice about questioning the bill
to say we have all electric and we do have led bulbs in light fixtures and most cooking is done on stove top..not oven!  Thanks!!
committing. I am about through with  my experiments, shifting to more task lighting and otherwise learning how to sip instead of gulp my lighting.

One I noticed in the last few years, 100 watt bulbs
[quote=Troy Rhodes]They are an amazing tool to educate people to realize how much actual work (in the technical physics sense) it takes to light a single 60 watt light bulb.[/quote[/quote]
.  They are an amazing tool to educate people to realize how much actual work (in the technical physics sense) it takes to light a single 60 watt light bulb.

They are not going to run your house.  Or even a tiny
At a children's museum near where I grew up they had a pedal power generator hooked up to a series of light bulbs. From what I recall, if your REALLY pushed yourself you could get 4 of the 6 bulbs
[quote=Devaka Cooray]Would LED be a good alternative to fluorescent bulbs for the people at level 3 ?[/quote]

LED lights are something I can't talk my husband out of.  It is not a battle worth
60 regular light bulb, limit usage to 2hrs vs leaving them on all night, go to sleep or open window blinds early in the mornin.

Get a smaller fridge and open it only once or twice a day only
more than a few LED lights.
LEDs can be 10 times more efficient than incandescent light bulbs, so you can get an equivalent of 1000W out of the 100W power source.
When you look how the light
large appliances like the fridge, printer, vacuum, so you'll need AC lines anyway, right? It seems like the LED AC bulbs use so little power, it wouldn't make much difference. Do you want two sets
My electricity usage:

Lights. currently old fashioned filament bulbs, gradually replacing with LEDs. Dislike low energy bulbs. A little mercury in my environment is more than I want.

Laptop
As Len mentioned, the individual LEDs are usually 3V. Don't buy AC bulbs as they contain regulators and rectifiers to get to 3V DC.
Don't buy bulbs of any voltage other than where the Voltage you
. Pooless. No more fluorescent light bulbs. Avid composter. Has eliminated 95% of the toxic gick from their home. Very concerned about environmental problems. Carbon footprint is 45 tons.

level
I'm trying a new bulb, and am impressed so far. It's a "flood light" shaped (BR30 is what the style is called), "edison" threaded base. Brand is Luminus "dimmable Wide Flood", 13.5W (65W equivalent
, and seen modern recreations or home-made versions of these types of engines and how some people have set them up with small generators to power a radio or a small light bulb. I've also seen examples
Do people here know about 1000bulbs.com? It's an online catalog source for light bulbs of various kinds. Their prices are good, but they're in Texas - for me, the shipping (except if I made up
In Massachusetts, I am now seeing Greenlite brand LED bulbs for sale for 99 cents. That's for the 9W bulb that replaces a standard 60W Edison bulb. They have other shapes (including flood lights
My knowledge in the arena of electricity peaks at light bulb maintenance. I plan to be able to do some rudimentary welding projects in the future. Is anyone welding, totally off the electricity grid
and shop lighting. A guy or two said they'd had bad luck with Phillips products (I seem to recall the experience was that some of that company's bulbs were not destined to last 15 years but had given
[quote=Dale Hodgins]I bought a number of Phillips 10.5 watt led bulbs.

They cast light which is very similar to incandescent. They are in a very durable hard plastic case. This is important for me[/quote]
I bought a number of Phillips 10.5 watt led bulbs.

They cast light which is very similar to incandescent. They are in a very durable hard plastic case. This is important for me, since some
has an interest in minimalism and repair. Probably owns a bicycle and uses it. Probably poo-less. Got rid of all fluorescent light bulbs. Dreaming of natural building some day. Avid composter
% of their own food. Studying permaculture. Got rid of all fluorescent light bulbs

Level 5: has taken a PDC and/or grows 90% of their own food

Level 6: Living a footprint that is 10 times lighter than
of them. The main principle that inspired me was the ancient Egyptian carving found deep within the Dendara pyramid that is being touted as an "Ancient Alien Light bulb" that I wholeheartedly have
on refrigerators powered with batteries - and i'm impressed by the low draw you say yours has, sounds like a big light bulb more than an electric compressor motor, so i'd really be interested in make
the dog. When 10 watts are used, the place is quite bright. He payed 50 cents per bulb.


Water pump ---His water pump is a 12 volt model about the size of a sausage. It powers a shower.

TV --- He
everything on the market makes power in units of a few Watts !

Using the old 100 watt light bulb as a standard of measure almost all Stirling engines are not up to the challenge!

An even more
Hi all; Been living off grid for 30 years now. I have tried most forms of lighting , kerosene, mantle lights , 12 vt car bulbs , 12 vt incandescent (edison base ) Fluorescent, compact florescent
[quote=Vincent Alexander]I guess my contribution to this topic would be to ask... "what are the best natural alternatives to light bulbs for use indoors?"

All this research about lightbulbs[/quote]
I guess my contribution to this topic would be to ask... "what are the best natural alternatives to light bulbs for use indoors?"

All this research about lightbulbs is making me want to do away
will be viable to generate electricity on the property.

I should have been clear on the lighting, I will not actually be using incandescent bulbs but CFLs or LEDs (LEDs are still ~$9 each in my area). I
battery'. NOT even if they are free. They won't last even a dozen or so 100% discharges... and ... why on Gods Green Earth are you going to run multiple 75 watt light bulbs. 7 or 8 watt LED's
I started replacing my conventional flashlights with LED ones about three years ago. I held off on buying edison-base bulbs to replace our 120v-system home lighting for seveal reasons: high price
fans, recessed lighting, and chandeliers. Those lamps are still TERRIBLE. Super dim, they take up to 10 minutes for a bank of them to reach full brightness, and they flicker. A lot. At least the power
I lived with NiFe batteries for many years, they are very durable! The voltage range (from below 10 to over 16.5 for a 12 volt nominal set) can be a huge challenge, DC light bulbs and other dc
their own 8hr battery pack so it does count towards energy usuage
2) LED light 4hrs/night, 6 bulbs at 20W/hr each, about 500W
3) Fridge filled with ice made in the day and not opened in the night
an incandescent bulb with a timer or thermostat can be a good choice. A hen-house is a perfect example. The hens need the heat, and egg production benefits from the extra light.

Like most things
[quote=Sherri Lynn]It seems to me that it would be more energy efficient to use incandescent bulbs in the winter time when heat is not a problem. It may depend on the climate where you live[/quote]
that in the winter, the extra heat from an incandescent bulb is not a problem, however, it is rarely advantageous to use lights for heat in a home because electricity is expensive energy.

In my opinion
It seems to me that it would be more energy efficient to use incandescent bulbs in the winter time when heat is not a problem. It may depend on the climate where you live. There are definite
bulb. It draws a whole 3ma.

The looser with the flame lens draws 18ma all the time and needs two in practice for enough light.

In the middle is the dark sensing lamp. While on it draws 24ma
or insects built something that blocks the light. Customers are advised to do a quick visual, and most never require a service call.

He seconded much of Len's advice about putting bulbs in series to match
hi no problem. those figures sound about right. i will try and break it down i bit more for you. i have 2 10 watt leds bulbs one string of led tape lights. that's the lighting sorted. i tend to use
[quote=Dale Hodgins]Thanks Len. I understood some of what you're telling me. So the voltage used by Christmas lights is determined by the number of little bulbs. They are so cheap right after[/quote]
Thanks Len. I understood some of what you're telling me. So the voltage used by Christmas lights is determined by the number of little bulbs. They are so cheap right after Christmas. I could see
there are such better alternatives available. My quick search for 40V lights yielded many results for incandescent scooter lights with the automotive style bulb base. The biggest LED selection seems to be here
been the only power used. Two 20w incandecent bulbs were attached. That's it. It worked very well. Many days of lighting on a charge. The battery is heavy.

The New Plan --- I'm going all out
I just ran some terrible math. Will try again later..
bulb, these will last for a LONG LONG time.

longer life = less costs on bulbs; without the toxin ick of CFLs

Yeah. My Brother in Law got a job working for a company selling light bulbs
for a LONG LONG time.

longer life = less costs on bulbs; without the toxin ick of CFLs



Yeah. My Brother in Law got a job working for a company selling light bulbs. They had Regular
it - it's like having 2 bulbs burning.
Mirrors are your friends - they can double the effectiveness of each bulb.
Likewise, reflective material around a ceiling lamp will increase the ambient light
dont forget to buy "heavy duty" or "rough service" incandescent bulbs if you can find them.
the filament is much stronger and when used in place of a normal bulb, these will last for a LONG LONG
incandescent light bulbs in their off-grid cabin with an Earth Battery. They gave me a brief explanation, what I remember is that you use two dissimilar metals a certain distance apart
This one (from Here) looks better:

http://cdn.instructables.com/FO3/33BS/GWRN4V7Y/FO333BSGWRN4V7Y.LARGE.jpg?jfc=cache
/F3RHJ6HGVOX0SBI.LARGE.jpg?jfc=cache-serve

from instructables


I kind of like the last comment on this one: [quote
[quote=Victor Johanson]"Rough Service" incandescents in all the standard wattages are available at http://www.newcandescent.com/ . They're more expensive, but it sounds like they also have far more longevity than the cheap ones from the box store. I'm used to having filaments break at the slightest jarring; maybe these hold up better.[/quote]

I second this!


Congrats Adrien!

I really wanted to try to build a bulb, but simply didn't have any time this month. I did find some possible sources for filament wire, some experimentation/investigation would
Cool! I am usually excluded from the contest here because I organize them, but not this time

When I posted the articles I thought that Canada was not affected by the ban, but apparently as of Jan 1st 75 and 100W are banned here too
permies » forums
Go to: