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there was nothing to eat ... except Jerusalem artichokes! [which are not from Jerusalem and are not related at all to artichokes [except the taste]. The Jerusalem part comes from the Italian
I grow Sunchokes, AKA Jerusalem Artichokes, a close relative of Sunflowers. I don't pull them until they're fully dead and dried. They don't compost worth crap but they do make great stakes
Currants will grow in shade - black, red and white. I'll second rhubarb, also Jerusalem artichokes, buckshorn plantain, mint.  Oh, and hardy fuschias grow in shade and have edible berries
I need to take my time and read through this thread with a fine-toothed comb. Skimming already has my mind racing. You friendly folks already reminded me to put in Jerusalem artichokes into my
[quote=Beth Wilder]Lol, I don't think I could ever get used to calling crosnes Chinese artichokes. I stumble over explaining to folks, when I say "sunchokes," that they might know them as Jerusalem[/quote]
an "artichoke"?!  Same deal with the Jerusalem artichoke....Jerusalem artichokes are North American!

My friend and I have been calling them Helianthus tubers and it's starting to stick around here
Biggest producing perennials I can think of..

Starch/root crops:
Jerusalem artichokes/sunchokes
Sweet potato
Dioscoria yam
Cassava/yuca
Bananas (harvested green)

Leafy greens:
Malabar
deal with the Jerusalem artichoke....Jerusalem artichokes are North American!

My friend and I have been calling them Helianthus tubers and it's starting to stick around here. ;)
with an artichoke.  What next?  Will we start calling yacons "Peruvian artichokes"?  Although at least in calling Stachys affinis the "Chinese artichoke" they managed to get the continent right.  Jerusalem
[quote=Beth Wilder]Lol, I don't think I could ever get used to calling crosnes Chinese artichokes. I stumble over explaining to folks, when I say "sunchokes," that they might know them as Jerusalem[/quote]
Lol, I don't think I could ever get used to calling crosnes Chinese artichokes. I stumble over explaining to folks, when I say "sunchokes," that they might know them as Jerusalem artichokes
affinis the "Chinese artichoke" they managed to get the continent right.  Jerusalem artichokes are North American!

LOL! I'm getting such a kick out of this thread. ;)


?  Will we start calling yacons "Peruvian artichokes"?  Although at least in calling Stachys affinis the "Chinese artichoke" they managed to get the continent right.  Jerusalem artichokes are North
I have germinated grocery store chestnuts by putting them in a container with a moist medium. I wonder if the supermarket refrigeration counts as cold stratification? Also jerusalem artichokes
I use the word "sunroots" to describe the edible tubers of any species of sunflower. I don't use the phrase  "Jerusalem Artichokes" because they are not from Jerusalem, and they are not artichokes. I
[quote=john muckleroy jr]I know "from reading" that Jerusalem Artichokes can be harvested anytime of the year and just left in the ground.Are there any other root crops like that?[/quote]

I grow
I know "from reading" that Jerusalem Artichokes can be harvested anytime of the year and just left in the ground.Are there any other root crops like that?
, chayote, Jerusalem artichokes, taro (from my regional store chain that that stocks more uncommon stuff); water chestnuts (Asian grocer).
I've also had a lot of failures but the monetary outlay
[quote=David Huang]While I haven't actually tried this on my patches of Jerusalem artichokes I've heard that aren't actually that hard to control or get rid of if you stop to consider their life[/quote]
While I haven't actually tried this on my patches of Jerusalem artichokes I've heard that aren't actually that hard to control or get rid of if you stop to consider their life cycle.  If you
and feed the heads- broken up a bit- green to the animals. Jerusalem artichokes and yacon leaves are good. I am experimenting with forage chicory and they love it. It has been shown
runner beans, bear's garlic (Ramps), Jerusalem artichokes and hundreds of others......







that in all my beds that need cover.

I have my Jerusalem Artichokes in beds, I am planning to plant some tomatoes/onion combo where I pulled them last year. If there are some that I missed I don't care
these guys all together in a guild?

How do you control the spread of the Jerusalem artichokes?
It's main purpose is the solid taproots to break up soil, right?
How do you harvest it without bothering
I am in zone 6 (South Ohio) with clay soil, I have had good success with:

- raspberries
-(thornless) blackberries
- Comfrey (bocking 14) - dynamic accumulator
- jerusalem artichokes
- Egyptian
grass...
Comfrey, Turkish Rocket, Rhubarb, Sorrel, Sweet Cicely, Giant Perennial Sunflower, Jerusalem Artichokes, Elderberry

What is this giant perennial sunflower you're talkigna bout
Suggest adding Salsify, Leeks, and Garlic. Here is why: The grow biointensive gardening website lists only seven crops as "High Calorie Root Crops"

Potatoes, Parsnips, Jerusalem artichokes, Sweet
are squash, parsnips, Jerusalem artichoke, and maybe salsify.

Parsnips and Jerusalem artichokes practically grow themselves. Salsify may as well. My squash patch takes a lot of space but only limited work
[quote=William Whitson][quote=Judith Browning]

It sounds like anyone who has problems with the inulin in jerusalem artichokes might want to stay away from dahlia tubers then?  

I'd like to try[/quote][/quote]
[quote=Judith Browning]

It sounds like anyone who has problems with the inulin in jerusalem artichokes might want to stay away from dahlia tubers then?  

I'd like to try to save seed from[/quote]
at your site that you don't preorder.

It sounds like anyone who has problems with the inulin in jerusalem artichokes might want to stay away from dahlia tubers then?  

I'd like to try to save seed
Sunchokes! AKA Jerusalem Artichokes, Sunroots and Fartichokes!
So easy to grow > too easy for some! It can become invasive in the wrong locations where you can't mow closely to keep it contained
some cute critters out there are moving other root crops around on me (Jerusalem artichokes and crosnes) so perhaps they transplanted the purple potato into the pot too?  I suspect that I might have
or in small tilled strips to begin with the perenials. There will be no large scale tilling.

So far im thinking comfrey, Jerusalem artichokes and maybe nettle. I picture maybe mod grazing this once during
, Turkish Rocket, Rhubarb, Sorrel, Sweet Cicely, Giant Perennial Sunflower, Jerusalem Artichokes, Elderberry
My sunroot are usually visited by eastern carpenter bee (Xylocopa virginica) and a local green sweat bee (Agapostemon species), in addition to a number of butterfly species I can't identify.

I've never seen domestic honeybee on sunroot.
I live in Portland OR, I have 3 varieties and none of them flower that much so at least here they're not a good bee plant.


I, too, am finding this problem, and I'm also in 6a.  I know there's a late blight that affects tomatoes in this soil, so the mention of- was it fusarium- rings true.  My colony of sunchokes is elevated but the past two weeks have been very wet following a droughty August and September.  

My chokes did get a fungal disease several years back, and the supplier at Ronniger's (yes, so long ago that it was still Ronniger's) talked me through a treatment that got rid of it.  It was a drier rot
Thanks for the help Joseph!

At my place, sunroots cannot be thoroughly dug. No matter how much effort I put into it, there are always tubers that survive, and re-sprout in the spring. I have received reports that in gardens with high populations of subterranean mammals, that the sunroot tubers may be completely consumed if left in the ground overwinter.

Sunroots will survive till spring if kept cool and in a more or less sealed container. I often add a bit of coconut choir or peat to absorb moisture and stabilize
Thanks Joseph... do you have an idea how long they might keep under best storage conditions? This is my first go around with them. Can I just leave some in the ground when I harvest? And thus avoid a separate planting and need to store?
[quote=Gary Grata]Regarding saving for replanting.... is there a best method of storing them?[/quote]

I have already replanted my sunroots. They overwinter great. They are very susceptible to dehydration once dug, so storing in plastic in the refrigerator works well. I store mine in buckets on the back porch, which stays just above freezing.


Regarding saving for replanting.... is there a best method of storing them?
Thanks all! I had dug some up a month ago and they had similar rot going on. Though I had planted in a slightly raised mound, the mounds did settle and they are in a relatively moist area. I have another tub which I haven't harvested yet, perhaps that will prove/disprove the 'too wet' theory as they should be high and dry.

They are rotting. Rots thrive in soggy soil. Growing them in drier soil may help. Digging them earlier in the season may help.

Sorry to hear of the disease issue, Gary, but may I offer thumbs up on the photos!?....very nice!  Given that you mentioned a red pigment and your photos show a glistening exudate within the rot, I'm going to suggest either a Fusarum fungal disease or Erwinia (carotavora?) bacterial disease.  On the one hand the gummy exudate suggests a bacterial *causal* agent, but it could also be that bacteria went to town within the tuber after a fungal disease made the initial cavity.  Erwinias and many
It just looks like rot to me.
[quote]HARVEST
Tubers can be harvested 4 to 6 weeks after flowering. Even though the flowers are pretty, yields will be better if the flower buds are pinched off as they appear. In cooler areas with well-drained soils it is better to dig them only as you use them. In subtropical areas and poorly drained soils the tubers may rot if left in the ground once the tops die back, so it is better to dig the whole harvest at once. Tubers do not store well out of the[/quote]
I just started harvesting Jerusalem Artichokes and every clump is affected with whatever it is shown in the pics I will attach. I have no idea what it might be. Fortunately it's just affecting maybe
[quote=Scott Foster]I was looking at your Landrace link, probably not going to be hardy in my area,..looks like you may be in high-desert.  Not sure.   How are you breeding for diversity...this is something I would dedicate an area to.[/quote]

I'm two USDA hardiness zones colder than you....

My breeding project originally consisted of growing feral sunroot seeds from Kansas. And selecting for best growth and productivity, to come up with a semi-improved strain. Then crossing that
[quote=Joseph Lofthouse][quote=Scott Foster]Are you doing seeds this year?   I live in NW New Jersey on the New York, Pennsylvania boarder....wondering if you'll have any good seeds for this area.[/quote]

The sunroot flowers look like they got frozen prematurely this year. I still went through the motions of collecting the seed heads. They are still drying. I expect to thresh them in a few weeks, so will have a better idea then.

I have a lot of semi-improved feral pollinated sunroot[/quote]
I grow dwarf sunray sunchoke and it matures early and flowers consistently.  Insects do visit, I'm pretty sure I have seem bees on them.  My problem is they are so early if I forget to pull them out of the ground they tend to rot. So I pull them out and store them in the fridge
[quote=Scott Foster]Are you doing seeds this year?   I live in NW New Jersey on the New York, Pennsylvania boarder....wondering if you'll have any good seeds for this area.[/quote]

The sunroot flowers look like they got frozen prematurely this year. I still went through the motions of collecting the seed heads. They are still drying. I expect to thresh them in a few weeks, so will have a better idea then.

I have a lot of semi-improved feral pollinated sunroot seeds. I don't recommend them
[quote=Joseph Lofthouse]
I don't see honeybees on sunroot flowers.

[/quote]

Are you doing seeds this year?   I live in NW New Jersey on the New York, Pennsylvania boarder....wondering if you'll have any good seeds for this area.

I don't see honeybees on sunroot flowers.


Mine didn't flower until late Sept. and early Oct. and those blossoms only lasted about a week. I see JA as a better resource for other purposes, not so much for pollinators. My chickens love the tubers.
All of the sunflower family including the Jerusalem Artichoke are good for predatory bugs.  Predatory micro-wasps, beneficial flys, ladybugs and of course the Carolina mantis as they like anything with a bug on it.   I just planted them this year and it was late so I didn't get any blooms .  I think the deer ate the tops off of them so I can not attest to pollinators.   Some of the organic websites say that goldfinch, bees, and butterflys like them.
Here in northern France they rarly flower at all . So for the bees nothing

David
My JA don't flower until very late in the year, late Sept or early Oct, and the bees don't really seem to pay any attention to it.  You can buy it from our very own Joseph Lofthouse.
Which variety of Jerusalem artichokes are best for bees?In fact are Jerusalem artichokes good for bees?Where is the best place to buy tubers?
How about Jerusalem Artichokes and some monster sunflowers.
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