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  - at least three comfrey plants
  - at least three sunchokes
  - at least a dozen sepp holzer grains

chop and drop (50 square feet)

ruth stout style composting (2 spots)
https
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  - at least three comfrey plants
  - at least three sunchokes
  - at least a dozen sepp holzer grains

chop and drop (50 square feet)

ruth stout style composting (2 spots)
https
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This thread has provided some excellent food for thought.  After 11 years in an apartment, I am purchasing a house, and the thing I'm most looking forward to is being able to start composting again
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into char or ash for addition to composting manure or directly into straw bales that we use for vegetable growing.

tree branches, cut in the process of making firewood for cooking and heating or fallen
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this thread makes me feel a lot better about being a failure as a composter. I have been fighting with my compost for the last 10 years or so (I live in a place with almost no browns, and only recently found sugar cane bagasse as an option, but it's a pain to haul. No decidious leaves, only hay if I want to buy it by the kg.). Even when I get what I figure would be a balance, the piles take up too much space in my tiny backyard garden (taking a lot more time to break down than I would have
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I guess there's composting and composting

My experience:

Food scraps: just feed them to the chickens and pigs, a lot better, less goes to the rodents than if I try to compost them (a rodent
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in general the faster it will happen). Composting is good only to create good soil for your vegetables, because you are not risking to breed lots of snails and slugs if you mulch with greenish stuff, best
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if that improves the situation.  But I'm also reading the threads on apartment composting because now it hurts to just throw the scraps away - knowing what it does to the landfill and what it could, maybe
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Just want to make sure I'm understanding what is really being discussed in this thread.  By "composting" in the title you mean "making a compost heap, stirring it, making it heat up aerobically
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I think Paul's book should be called "Everything You Think You Know About Permaculture Is Wrong" now.  

I am trying to figure out what makes sense in an urban chicken.  I mean situation.  Freudian slip.  I d not have chickens.  I do not have happiness from housemates yet for having chickens.   We said, "if you can keep the worms alive for a year, then you can have chickens."  Well, I did keep the worms alive for a year, but also kept some fruit flies alive as well...but now they live happily
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First of all, chop and drop gasses off just as much carbon and nitrogen as composting.  It just takes months and years, rather than weeks.  The volume (by percentage) of carbon sequestered
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I agree about the monoculture, importing material approach to composting being flawed, but how about the classic "my neighbor wanted to cut down some trees and I couldn't stop them" situation
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The best lazy man compost I have ever seen was very simple.
My friend created a series of boxes cut into a hillside. The first box on top of the hill was level with the soil so all he had to do was drive his wagon up to this first box and dump the material.
The side of the first box facing out had bracket the 2X6 cedar boards fit into to make the one side. The next box was just below the first at the edge of the 2X6 boards so when the boards were remove the material would dump into this box.
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Whether we build a pile and encourage the hot composting process, or we leave the organic matter where it fell and let it decompose at its own pace in that spot, the essential processes
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I DO NOT COMPOST! We plant close to an acre in garden every year. My friend does the same, and we do not compost. We have for years taken the manure of sheep, goats, cows, rabbits, with all the hay and straw there within, and put it directly in the garden in rows, like furrows going east and west. Plants like to have their tops hot and their roots cool., mulching this way does a variety of things. One the root systems stay open longer and feeds longer, giving more food and nutrients to
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Another example
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"composting in place" system and the soil has become an interesting mass of microbial life with an ever-deepening rich topsoil. The soil has a "bounce" to it, that every gardener and farmer notices. Some
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There's a lot of great information here, and some good food for thought.

My thoughts on the topic: for those of us who don't have livestock, for any number of reasons, there is merit to doing something, anything with your food scraps other than sending it away with the garbage man. Especially when considering what that means, in my town that means its would be transported almost fifty miles to be added to a landfill, yuck!
so I compost in a very lazy way, adding most anything to the pile
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About importing material- how does that apply to importing feed scraps for the chickens??? I get throw away fruit and veggies from a grocery store for my birds and they love it. I'd hate to think I'm hurting them or my land by doing it.
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Reason 13!

My kitchen scraps go to the chickens. I also collect the scraps of the Fellowship Meals we have at church to feed them.
My lawn/garden waste also gets processed by chickens, ducks, and rabbits.
The only manure I have to move is the rabbit manure (which is mixed with leaves and other misc--such as raw potato peels that can't be fed to the animals-- that gets tossed in the pseudo-compost pile under their cages).

I am bringing in items from off site -- grass clippings and
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It is the biology that matters. In a pile, turned into the dirt big ag style, run through cattle, left to rot (until it burns) like the "conservation" lands--they all put most of the carbon back in the air, in varying mixes of CO2 and methane depending on how bad the biology is. It's just a question of how fast.
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[quote=William James]Chickens and or Pigs. Worms in a flow-thru worm bin.
Compost no more.
Just throw stuff away and harvest the goodies.
William[/quote]
Yes, I agree, Less work us and yet excellent returns.
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[quote=Matt Powers]"Tucking" into the soil also seems like too much work. I collect things in a bowl and toss it over a fence. I pitch fork things into a tall pile every few days. I move manure in every week or so. It seems easier than watering & turning.[/quote]
Tucking mulch in the soil at first may seem laborious at first but once its formed all I have to do is periodically maintain the structure.
So a tall pile, you mean you just pile manure and mulch in layers?
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, which is Not what you want to do when composting. The pile needed to be turned earlier.

There is something to consider about all of this, and that is that no process is "perfect". There are always
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On the thread "Fungi improving soil quality and health" , there are some aspects related to health hazards to humans and other critters induced by composting...
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Love the thinking involved here. Makes me realize again, the Hindu saying "Desha, Kala, Patra" (time, place, circumstance) is so accurate in so many areas!

We do some composting, and i love
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I think it is possible to stop composting once you reach a certain level of permie-ness, but that for most people, in most situations, composting is a realistic solution. In my adult life, I started
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I used to live next to a huge backyard composting operation. The whole front yard was a towering pile of wood chips delivered by the tree company, the backyard was a towering pile of compost
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Chickens and or Pigs. Worms in a flow-thru worm bin.
Compost no more.
Just throw stuff away and harvest the goodies.
William
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and nitrogen are lost in composting. I understand that some nitrogen disappears by ammonia evaporation when it comes to manures, but that's about it. I'm a huge fan of vermicomposting so all that turning
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Compost makes great potting mix, and the ability to jump start new garden beds into soil microbiological diversity. Although on a broad scale it is impractical, and instead we need our systems to create soil and soil life by design.

Ya really shouldn't be losing 95% of your mass. I hardly lose any with the Berkeley method of compost making.

I'm all about finding as many ways as I can to build up my soil life. Lazy is nice, but I like the ability to put in extra effort for extra
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I did a Berkeley pile last year (with a broken leg!) And that was too much work! But man the soil it created was AMAZING! It made the most wonderful seed starting mix. I also do the "Ruth Stout" bury in the garden method. I have a vermacomposting bin. I am just trying them all. I am trying to include some pics of my compost and seed starting mix.
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Don't we lose a lot of that carbon when a chicken or pig eat the food scraps? Instead of microorganisms exhaling CO2 isn't the animal doing the same thing?
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I helped make a Berkeley, (is that the right name?) compost heap once. On the first turn after four days we could smell the ammonia coming off it.
The main reason I make some compost is to have it available as seed raising mix....of course that might be another whole disadvantages of..topic!
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"Tucking" into the soil also seems like too much work. I collect things in a bowl and toss it over a fence. I pitch fork things into a tall pile every few days. I move manure in every week or so. It seems easier than watering & turning.
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Reason 12 isn't a reason: size doesn't diminish if you get your proportions right (and you aren't in the tropics) though I would say I prefer working with chickens to make "compost".

I just toss my scraps to chickens and leftovers to pig & dog. I do not make compost though I bring in horse & cow manure & "brown" material (mostly animal bedding) into the mix. In the end I end up with a product that is constantly being turned and processed. Very quickly it is soil too loose to pitchfork.

I
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5 years ago I tried the whole composting thing, I had to know a ratio of carbon to nitrogen which (with a combination of perseverance) was successful in making fine compost, what I realized
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down side: I seldom get my pile of scraps and derbies to get hot and I hate fussing with it.
I have acquired two nice compost bins so I pretend I am composting. Real what I am doing is feeding my
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The biggest concern to me is spreading diseases and invasive bugs and plants. On-site sources are definitely preferred, the closer the better.
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I find that if I let it heat up at least once during the spring, it will retain its moisture for the rest of the season, including our long dry summer. If I don't, it just dries up and shrivels, which doesn't encourage ongoing microbiological development toward compost. I put all of mine in the yard in the fall before all the leaves fall. It might not be 100% refined compost, but it's good for the yard at that point.
John S
PDX OR
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and used as mulch. Worms drag it down.

During the growing season,none of my space is allotted to composting.
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some composting techniques don't add carbon to the atmosphere. the marin carbon project http://www.marincarbonproject.org/ is researching this and has found that making large compost piles
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. But I don't have anything to compost, really.

Because:

1) I'm bad about saving kitchen scraps. A moral failing. Induced by childhood composting trauma. (My mother's compost buckets were nasty
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I think the world is rich with the ideas of the upside of composting. Mostly that the resulting product is almost magical in what it can do for soil and horticulture. The upsides are awesome
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Just put a roof over it.
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[quote=Angela Wilcox]We have an abundance of broom sedge growing in the field. Can broom sedge be used as cover material in a humanure hacienda?[/quote]

Yes, I think that sounds like what I saw recommended in the Humanure Handbook. Maybe you'd want to harvest it and dry it for a while, or harvest a year's supply while it is dormant, so that it is a carbon-heavy item rather than green, when it might still be a nitrogen-heavy item? But then maybe seeds would be an issue? I don't know.
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We have an abundance of broom sedge growing in the field. Can broom sedge be used as cover material in a humanure hacienda?
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If you do not have the humanure handbook I would suggest purchasing it as it would clear up any questions or concerns you might have. http://humanurehandbook.com/

A well built compost pile will have a huge amount of carbon able to soak up gallons of liquids and prevent runoff. I have heard of people throwing a tarp over their piles during really heavy rains, but in general, a decent biological sponge located in the bottom of the pile will prevent any moisture from running out of the pile.
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Most of your concerns are really pertinent and all are dependent upon how well the compost bin is set up and worked.

Safe composting (that is including any manure not just human) needs to be a hot
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acceptible distance from sewage can vary significantly depending on soil and water conditions. i think best solution is to raincover and containerize to eliminate chance of liquid seepage, a la what these people got going on in this thread
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Hey permies,

We recently just moved to a small community and while I am all for humanure, I am a little concerned about some of there techniques. In particular, I am a little concerned with the proximity of there human waste compost bin to their veggie garden. The compost bin is located only 20 or 30 feet from the veggies, and up hill. I would be worried that rain might wash pathogens into their vegetables. Can any one provide some info on a safe distance to keep human waste from edible
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The aminopyralid class of herbicides is very persistent even through the composting process, and even through the digestive system of ruminants. Most of the other herbicides largely break down within
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[quote=Chris Kott]

I also wonder if composting in the presence of biochar, or rather charcoal becoming biochar, results in the absorption/adsorption of materials that are otherwise lost[/quote]
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I like your reasoning, Marco.

I also wonder if composting in the presence of biochar, or rather charcoal becoming biochar, results in the absorption/adsorption of materials that are otherwise lost
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into the soil via the root network, and dropping a new layer of leaves and spent plants onto the soil surface.  A year later, 98% or more of it is gone.  Thus, the goal of composting has to be more
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for not composting, ever, I think I would have a different opinion.

If it were all offgassing, I might have a problem with that. But I don't think it's doing so, but rather being locked up in soil
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I remember one of Geoff Lawton's videos where he say no loss of mass for hi 28-day compost piles. I admire Geoff but my composting was never as fast as his and somebody said it was probably because
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By instinct I would agree with the "90% by volume" thing, but then what you are left with is much more dense than the starting material. I'm not sure I would be able to put any kind of reasonable figure on percentage of mass lost. And then you have that some materials are inherently wetter, or less dense to start with.

I think the only meaningful measurement would dry-mass before to dry mass after comparison. But then that figure would have little meaning to most people, because it is not a
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It seems to me, if you look at it that way, "all of it" is the answer to how much organic matter is lost whether you compost it or not.  It's just the time frame that is different.  If you put wood in a hugel bed, eventually, it will all be lost, but it will take longer because less of the "good stuff" is available immediately.  With compost, it is lost sooner but more "good stuff" is available immediately.  Both are a trade-off, with something like wood chips being in-between.

 
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are claiming volume losses of 10-50%
People composting using the Berkeley method claim no volume loss.
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Hmm, interesting takes. My experience has been somewhere between 50 and 75% decrease in volume from the starting pile to the finished compost. I also tend to compost with lots of woody chips that I keep in the finished product so that probably helps. I'm not really clear on what the point that Paul is making though. I know that he is not a fan of compost for various reasons but the purpose of compost seems to me to be to take a wide array of waste products and decompose them in a controlled
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Good point on the air, Wayne.  Volume is much more accurate than height, but mass is probably the best way to quantify it, leaving out biodiversity.  I've never quantified it, but I would guess that a compost pile is 50% air and compost may be around 10-20% air; just a WAG.  If we weigh it before and after we can get a more accurate picture.  Strictly speaking, in a lab environment, I'd probably want to look at the mass from a dry matter standpoint.  How much dry matter is in the initial pile
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I have to agree with fearless leader here, 90% to 95% loss of mass volume seems spot on.
I compost mostly manures mixed with lots of straw, twigs and leaves.
A 4 foot cube will reduce in 90 days to a 4x4x2 foot area, the soil under this mass will be totally awesome soil, very soft, full of worms and with a microbiome that is hard to measure because it is so stacked with bacteria, fungi and all the other good critters that it is very hard to count them.
Because of this I
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[quote=wayne fajkus]Do THIS (bury it?) and the shrinkage is less? [/quote]

Move to the desert, where organic matter tends to mummify rather than compost.  Then you can keep it "forever."  It won't grow anything in that state, of course.....

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Thats hard to quantify. When i filled my bin with yucca leaves it easily fell by your number or more. Think about all the air with 500 yucca plants in a pile.

Shrinkage is shrinkage. It's gonna happpen whether a person agrees thats its happening or not. Is there a part 2? Do THIS (bury it?) and the shrinkage is less?
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document that mentioned volume and mass, but their composting seemed .... weird.   7 days of composting.   Composting just one material.  There were some that did 100 days of composting (should be plenty
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Stove from Chris McClellan (aka Uncle Mud)
Thermophilic Composting for the Garden or Homestead pdf from Alan Booker
[url=https://permies.com/t/106347/Everyday-Artisans-Common-Sense-Approach
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Stove from Chris McClellan (aka Uncle Mud)
Thermophilic Composting for the Garden or Homestead pdf from Alan Booker
[url=https://permies.com/t/106347/Everyday-Artisans-Common-Sense-Approach
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)
Ruth Stout style composting (2 spots)


https://permies.com/t/58650/a/69591/PEP-rectangle-gardening-straw
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of them are: making a wood bench, carving a spoon, making a sign, Ruth Stout composting, etc. They teach you the basics in an easy to do, fun to achieve way, and you get something tangible out
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)
Ruth Stout style composting (2 spots)


https://permies.com/t/58650/a/69591/PEP-rectangle-gardening-straw
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You can see some of the results here:  https://permaculture-design-course.com

We have since added a tube to each can.  The mission is to dessicate the material - age it without breakdown.  

There will be a lot of info in the new book.  And there will be a lot of info in the skiddable structures microdoc that will come out before the new kickstarter starts.

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Hi all.

I did a search on the site about the composting procedure up on the Lab, and I was wondering about progress.

Specifically, I was wondering about the poop bins, storage, and how
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who are trying hard to help put more water back into the aquifers. Activists managed to get composting toilets to be legal in houses, they managed to get an easy way for townspeople on the downhill
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I think I have a workable way to use urine in your gardens without wasting any water or creating smell.
It will also reduce the liquid load in your composting toilets.

There certainly
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It is quite legal in rural Mexico. That is one among many reasons I moved here.

Composting toilets: no problem.
Off the electrical grid: no problem
Collect rain water: no problem

Nobody
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Your toilet situation is going to be the stickiest issue for you. There are often rules about dealing with human waste and lots of municipalities don't even allow composting toilets. If you want
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Various links with detailed thoughts: https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-advantages-of-composting-toilets/answer/Brian-Fey

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stFIjrdf4p4[/youtube
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mushrooms I like on piles to see if they like it.
My composting toilets use both composting worms and dung beetles since the chambers are quite large and there is space on the periphery that they can
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Hello, i have finally moved to a house where i can compost. I am reading "The Complete Book of Composting." 350 pages in. Yesterday I went out to buy some manure to start my pile (wanted to generate
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A LOT of stuff behind. One thing was this trash can with a spigot on the bottom, they told us that it was a bokashi composting system that they were abandoning because, for reasons unknown, they had
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have a simple bucket composting toilet.

I have had nothing but bad luck with refrigerators the past few years and honestly I hate them. I hate the noise they make, the room they take up, etc. And I
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and management produces materials for composting and building soil, or possibly an income stream if you choose plants with flower sales potential, herbal tea use, home medicine use or some other
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onward I had hot (or at least warm) composting going on.  

I'm tempted to try to replicate this process in a more mobile form next winter.  I'm imagining a 55 gallon drum full of leaves and 5-10
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[quote=Bryant RedHawk]delving in to this deeper it becomes apparent that Chicago is just as corrupt politically (possibly more so) as New York, the city councils bend to the will of the people who own and operate the land fills (in NY that is La Cosa Nostra, and the same is most likely true of Chi town).[/quote]

Incredibly so! I've spent far too many years of my life there - on the outskirts, watching, disgusted, voting, petitioning, resisting... I can't even begin to express my elation
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delving in to this deeper it becomes apparent that Chicago is just as corrupt politically (possibly more so) as New York, the city councils bend to the will of the people who own and operate the land fills (in NY that is La Cosa Nostra, and the same is most likely true of Chi town).
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[quote=Mart Hale]Chicago will always compost, but they use people, and cement to get the job done.      Glad I don't live there.[/quote]

We didn't live in the city, but even in the suburbs, the insanity is real. We finally got out of there, for good, 3 days ago!
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The voters don't notice the small increments on how things are getting worse for nature.  The water is a little worse each year and so goes the land and the air.  It makes me think of the story of the frog in the tepid water.  The water is slowly warmed and the frog does not notice until he is being cooked in the hot water.
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I truly hate to read about the insanity of politicians, almost as much as seeing that they have been continually put back in office by voters that are apparently as out of touch with reality as the politicians.

Cities rarely make adjustments to their laws and regulations if the population doesn't show up to their meetings in droves to make their voices heard.
Cities also seem to have the same clowns running them for years and years.
Until voters start firing these politicians for not
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Chicago will always compost, but they use people, and cement to get the job done.      Glad I don't live there.
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How sweet of you. I didn't  read the rest. You are quit right. Normally I ignore tv and newspapers. Permies is the only social media I use. YouTube is my only entertainment, mainly handicrafts and history. Thank you for reminding me how to keep my sanity in this crazy World!
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Sad to hear it makes you cry Amanda, if you’re sensitive please try not to read stories like that.
I’m hardened against that stuff, some people just are, equally valuable in my opinion.
But i need happy people doing nice things to remind me not all is gloom and doom. Don’t read on cause that is my take on bureaucracy and the state of the world.

Don’t read this.

Bureaucracy kills. And it is just starting. It will get a lot worse. It’s the nature of it.
Not the most competent people
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That made me cry. What is wrong with people?
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Hows that for a headline? <g>  

But true, unfortunately. I listened to an interview with the business owners today. Their mild take is that there was no business permitting options between "None" for residential homeowners and "Industrial 3" (or whatever that is) for heavy industry. They're somewhere in the middle and they couldn't find a way through the maze.

And of all places to find  news on the subject!  Wonders never
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remember reading at least two sources of composting instructions saying specifically to *never* add soil to one's compost heap. Since I've never been very impressed with my composting efforts, we're going
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of composting, but Johnson's seems to be a bit of a better beast for various reasons. I encourage any readers to check out the longer video about Johnson and any other online info that's related
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similar to municipal composting systems run air through buried, perforated hoses or vent systems except his is aerated passively and can be created with cheap materials and scaled up easily
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on obtaining microorganism information in farming (particularly the part on composting, no-till and microscope research)... No wonder it's so expensive to get soil biology tested. It sounds very tedious. I guess
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The bible of composting - 1007 pages
https://i.imgur.com/iOC0DU5.png
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When I first started composting I read about putting soil in the heap but had no notion of why this was recommended. I guessed it might be to do with adding organisms that would help make compost
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.
Composting in a trench accomplishes the goal very well.  The admonition is not to mix your carbon material in your garden soil because it ties up the nitrogen compounds so the plants can't initially get
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and keel over in the wind. And more tasty to pests.  The amount of biomass is increasing so much that I wear myself this time of year chopping  and composting, plus most of the rest of the year I am goat
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equation in composting by the hot method.
There are sound reasons for the 1/3 rule of thumb for building a compost heap (1/3 brown matter, 1/3 green matter, 1/3 manures and soil).
In a standard heap
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Check out my video on a composting toilet I made from a scrap pallet and some left over plywood and made my own pee separator from an old plastic vinegar bottle. It is important to keep #1 and #2
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earthworms in a farming scenario... are you merely coexisting with the worms, or are you "feeding the worms" by your composting actions and thereby benefiting from the increased worm activity (read
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Hello,
I'm running a small composting operation, using primarily yard wastes. My bosses do not want to use any manures, which seems to be the best source of P. Any ideas for something to mix
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To get a fungal element into that wonderful detritus you would need to put it through a composting cycle that included at least 1/4 volume of manures and fresh greens from deciduous trees or grasses
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single bit of soil for my plants, either by hauling it in or by composting, I have a real can-do attitude when it comes to improving existing soil. But, of course, i would prefer to start
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, and they’ve eaten a hole in it, so that seems promising. I also added a green onion and a chunk of celery; not sure if they will eat those or not. It does seem that they have some potential for composting
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Composting styrofoam using superworms/mealworms has been discussed before here:

https://permies.com/t/72035/critters/Styrofoam-Composting-Mealworms

And here is the scientific study:

https
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Company & Making Compost in Large Batches with Kevin Davies
Worm Composting and Soil Recipes with Steve Masley
Composting for Complete Beginners with CaliKim [/list
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Hi James, I've been composting SBG for years. It is wet and dense, and needs good mixing with bulky brown materials to keep it from going anaerobic. Also high in phosphorous, so keep an eye on soil
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while to pay for the transportation to you.  I'm not sure what your arrangement is, but that's what I'd try for, though I'd probably pick it up if I had the right composting set-up.

Let us know how
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to build a natural swimming pond check out my video on that. https://youtu.be/9JR-PLUxTME
Spring development, composting toilet, a shower from two IBC 250 gal totes, modifying a harbor freight sawmill
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and pieces of permiculture and implement them into our lives.  I think a lot of the people I know are interesting in things like zero waste living, composting, apartment gardens, etc.  The more people
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of permiculture and implement them into our lives.  I think a lot of the people I know are interesting in things like zero waste living, composting, apartment gardens, etc.  The more people who do
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and put as many things as I could into practice, basically composting in a closed bin, planting wherever possible, making my own filters and so on in our small apartment.

Once we are done paying it off
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in my raised bed in my backyard. This year I have added another raised bed and plan to invest a lot more energy into composting and developing healthy soil, growing more cool weather crops, seed saving
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and recyclables before hauling them away, and for composting yard waste. We don't have curbside pickup of refuse/recyclables in our town, residents have to either bring their things to the transfer
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more sustainable lives.

Examples of what I've done in the past include Strawbale Gardening, virtual green homes tour, canning, fermentation, kombucha, composting, humanure.

The sky is the limit
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Tommy,

Doubtless I will use the bedding as mulch.  In fact I have a good sized pile that has built up over winter.  I am curious though about what the initial nutrient levels of the mushroom compost is and what I have to add.  I am especially curious about the NPK levels.

Thanks for the input,

Eric
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If you use woodchips for their bedding material, you can just clear out their used bedding and use it as a mulch directly.
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Thanks Redhawk,

I have a ton of rabbit litter and I want to put it to good use ASAP.  I may very well apply this to my mushroom compost to add nitrogen and other nutrients.

By the way, do you have an idea of the nutrient contents of freshly composted wine cap mushroom compost (made from autumn olive)?

Eric
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hay pellets, but I was wondering if anyone had any tips about composting it. Are there any dangers associated with using rabbit poo in a human-food garden? What about a rabbit-food garden? How do I
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We half fill the litter pan with bagged topsoil,  the rabbits add poop,pee and wasted orchard grass hay.
I consider a premium amendment , the perfect thing to add to a hole or container,  even better for top dressing plants.
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Greg, I'm with you. I apply rabbit manure directly to the garden. No composting necessary. But of course, it could be used in compost too, if someone wanted to do that. I just prefer to keep
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[quote=Lucca Wade]Are there any dangers associated with using rabbit poo in a human-food garden?[/quote]
I put my rabbit manure straight onto the garden without worrying about composting.
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Luca,

Thanks for bringing this topic up!  My daughter adopted a rabbit last summer.  He is quite the mischievous little trouble maker but we all love him.  And the moment I am trying to compost his litter in a pile on the garden, and I was hoping that I could simply add his pellets/litter straight to the garden.  Thanks for confirming that I can do just this.

Eric
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from my experience I think you could use rabbit pellets as seed starting pellets. Just put it in your garden. I have also seen compost worms love it, so that is probably a good option. I'm sure it would be a wonderful compost pile addition.
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One of the nice things about rabbits is they're very unlikely to carry zoonotic diseases (ones that can be transmitted to humans). You can put it in the regular compost with food scraps, yard waste, ets. or you can just add it directly to the soil. It also doesn't burn plants like uncomposted manure from some animals can.
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I have no concerns using any plant eating animal manure,  directly in the garden or composted.
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Sounds like a really nice problem to have. Added this to a couple other forums for more specifics from the bunny poo experts. Hope you don't mind. Welcome to permies.
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was wondering if anyone had any tips about composting it. Are there any dangers associated with using rabbit poo in a human-food garden? What about a rabbit-food garden? How do I best compost
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the geodesic dome.   Camping in the adjacent deep forest is also available  (many good tent sites).  The learning center has its own kitchen/dining area and composting toilets.

Close-by: The areas
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case I'm a single mother with three kids), it just drags on and on and on. I hate using a composting bucket toilet, but I've used one for five years because I didn't have money (until now) to put
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]Different types of composting I recommend for urban settings

Module 4: Your Master Plan

In this module you will learn:

How to design your Master Plan[/list
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You don't need to actively compost by turning your pile regularly.  You can create a passive pile and do lazy composting.   I have a couple of places in the garden where I just toss stuff like citrus
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You can drill holes in a pvc pipe and put it in the ground in one of your garden beds, the onions will eventually break down, something like this:
https://offbeathome.com/worm-tube-composting
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composting system, graywater pond, gardens in the works, 2 large beautiful lakes on the land, 80 acres of beautiful forest that we are planting like crazy on! We have epic music jams all the time
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.  v


Sure thing Michael,

The general idea of Korean Natural farming is to do composing using composting without air, anaerobic composting.    Be warned, this stinks like a paper mill
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Oak leaves and composting experiment!

    I have been asked by too many people what they can do with Oak Leaves because they take so long to break down. The main question is (Do Oak leaves have
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for composting and turning sugar sand into soil. We are helping wildlife, building bat boxes, bees, etc. Want to connect, trade, start a group of netwrokers. I am an artist as well. Please write back, your
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parts, so we plant in guilds and harvest what we want, while composting the rest.
- Attracts beneficial insects (buckwheat, dill, various flowers that are intercropped within the veggie garden
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.

Even composting has a limit, as the prime mover is only laid down 1.4kw/hr/m^2 (the sun).

This very website makes the case that the ole filament bulb is more 'green' than CFL's.

As always
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but I plan to build a homestead with natural building materials. Cob, log cabin,spring development, composting toilet, a shower from two IBC 250 gal totes, modifying a harbor freight sawmill to cut
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[front loader] , discourage long showers but still have a flush toilet
which is listed for replacement with a composting one.
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[quote=Bryant RedHawk]

Manures are not a part of good compost unless you are trying to compost manure, Soil on the other hand will be desirable for helping with bacteria/fungi introduction and to cap the heap for moisture retention.
If you want to use the potting soil you mentioned, go for it, just use it as thin layers between your browns and greens. or you could use it for the cap material.
Urine is a source of Nitrogen (ammonia compounds such as urea), consider that an amendment not a[/quote]
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hau Taylor, I can not see any reason to not compost those materials, especially if you shred to small pieces.

Cedar branches - greens and browns (the woody stems are the browns), same goes for shrub branches.
Carnations are greens.

Manures are not a part of good compost unless you are trying to compost manure, Soil on the other hand will be desirable for helping with bacteria/fungi introduction and to cap the heap for moisture retention.
If you want to use the potting soil you
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manure? I read that manure with at least 80%+ vegetative matter is ideal for composting. If I ate vegan for a day and collected the manure would that be safe to compost or would I have to age it?
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1. I just collected a lot of greens from a wedding and plan on composting them. It is a mix of cedar branches, shrub branches, and carnations. I plan to shred everything down into little pieces
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We have two types- the one you picture here and another one with a deep taproot.

We pulled when we could (and trashed, which felt like a tremendous waste but composting really didn't work for us
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infrastructure for those folks not lucky (or providential) enough to live in a rural setting where well-water and composting toilets can alleviate some of the problems city dwellers will have when sewer
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want to change your title - it sounds a little as if you plan on composting your neighbors, not dealing with compostables the neighbors are donating! ;-
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of these are the target use, which in an earthberm/wofati is a wooden palisade as a retaining wall.

For testing the borate/lime/colemanite product, I’d put some samples through some composting. Wouldn’t
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in an earthberm/wofati is a wooden palisade as a retaining wall.

For testing the borate/lime/colemanite product, I’d put some samples through some composting. Wouldn’t this be a worst case scenario
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plants and put fresh on the paths. I also use urine on my wood chip piles to help them degrade a little their first year, or similarly, putting them in the duck house for a few months before composting
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on the paths. I also use urine on my wood chip piles to help them degrade a little their first year, or similarly, putting them in the duck house for a few months before composting them.

The one
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near a fire or eaten an animal, you'll get more dioxin than composting paper.
Soil is the natural place for dioxins to be broken down.
Compost is exceptional at denaturing compounds - even so
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Hi. A couple of bits of information from a couple of sites: Here in Australia, this is the situation: http://www.the-compost-gardener.com/-composting-paper-is-it-safe-.html. As you'll see, glossy
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be broken down in the composting / mulching process but heavy metals which are common indyes will build up and enter the food chain. One company got back to me with a positive tick so I use tjere stuff
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composting, inspection, and care to prevent contamination. Nothing but chop-n-drop makes it to food production areas directly. Any diseased plants (still happens periodically) are removed
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as many functions into the sink as possible (a tourist destination could be one of them, thank you very much)
Connected to the chicken coop inside the sink would be a closed composting system
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[quote=Jay Angler]Welcome to Permies Vasco Vieira!

Free wood chips are a great resource for planting trees. I noticed you're on a fairly small Island - is it possible to get seaweed for composting[/quote]
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Welcome to Permies Vasco Vieira!

Free wood chips are a great resource for planting trees. I noticed you're on a fairly small Island - is it possible to get seaweed for composting
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