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[quote=Cathy James]I don't think direct seeding in heavy clay is a realistic option. My own experiments in that direction have failed. Even direct seeding lawn grass on unimproved, impacted, dense heavy clay has yielded nothing.

At a minimum, you need to dig, hoe, or rototill the heavy clay once to break up the dense, airless soil, and add a thin layer of fine seedbed soil that is enough to protect the seeds while they are getting started. You will need to irrigate frequently until the new[/quote]
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Hola!

I have been the last couple of years playing with this concept but I still don't find the best way to work things out hehehe. I have read Joseph articles and book, and also I am following the french guy Pascal Poot, who makes some kind of landrace. What we all want , I guess, is to have vegetables growing "almost" like weeds, just with the rain or other conditions we might find.

For doing that, I have experimented with several things. Direct seeding over the soil (heavy clay) was a
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Hola Josh!

This is very inspiring. I want to improve my propagating setup, very precarious at the moment. I think I should invest a bit to improve my chances of success. Now we are having a heat wave here and many of my things are suffering a lot
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My experience in the mediterranean climate is

Seeds beats everything.

So the challenge is how to create the best conditions for seeds to thrive by direct planting.

I had lots of things going on on the last 2-3 years. Citrus, wich were the main crop here, are being harder than I thougt, very delicate. Olives, you can stick them werever and almost forget them. All the prunus family can thrive here. Chestnuts suffer a lot with the mediterranean sun, but they recover.

I planted super
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[quote=L. Johnson]I don't know about the specific varieties mentioned, but bamboos are essentially a giant grass. They die back as they age and the dead stems and leaves fall. It's part of their life cycle as far as I know.

I would be surprised to find a bamboo stalk much older than 7-8 years.

When I walk through our bamboo groves I often have to clear the deadfall annually unless it's an area we harvest the shoots.[/quote]

Gracias! I guess all of them will have this process. But as I
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Hello! We have a swimming pool and behind the swimming pool we have a terrible view, so we thought that planting bamboo might be a good idea. So we ordered bamboos based on how tall they grow and also rizome barriers to avoid them fucking around, and life was good until an acquaintance told me “this is a mess close to a swimming pool, because of the leaves falling!”

So, info that we didnt know messing with our plans. But I have read that not all bamboos are created equal and not all of them
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[quote=Konstantinos Karoubas]Antonio,

I forgot to mention,

Mark some of the locations you place the seeds, so you can check on them.
You can put three stones, or a stick to mark the location.

In the spring, as the weeds grow its tough to find the small new trees.

Kostas[/quote]

I didnt mark them, but I followed a pattern. I sowed 4-5 seeds and walked a stride, and then again, so I just have to follow that pattern to see where I planted them. I will not go there again in
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Hola Kostas!

I had some Florsilva seeds that I had for my place. I bought more than needed, so I went to a nearby abandoned place wich belongs to a Spanish major bank, and I sowed all the leftovers there with my two kids.

I had a super special tool (half pruner) to dig fast holes and place there 5-6 seeds. I had almond, peach, apricot, cherry, prune and walnut. Lets see how it goes. The place is really close to the city border, so I guess they will plan to build there anytime in the next
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Hi Kostas. I was thinking about your project and I thought thay maybe broadcasting a seed mix of ground covers and the like, Sepp Holzer style, might help the trees to grow better, having more n fixers, dynamic accumulators and useful plants. You could just try it in a couple of locations and see what happens, throwing around clover, borage, fava beens... for 100 or 200 euros you could have enough seeds to cover two full locations, and do the job in 10 minutes.

Maybe is useful, maybe dont
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[quote=Konstantinos Karoubas]Hola Antonio,

Felicitaciones for your success !!!

I will definitely try chestnuts at all locations next fall.

Send us a small video and/or photos.


Thanks

Kostas
[/quote]

Here,some chestnuts sprouting
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Hola Kostas!

Just to inform you, I have many almond trees growing in my property, also apricots, all from seed.

But what it amazes me is that I have lots of chestnuts sprouting also, I didnt think those were going to thrive and they are. So maybe you could try those, I just bought them on the local supermarket. Spent 2,5€

Also I collected acorns in Madrid and sowed them. Lets see what sprouts.

I will not bury more seeds until next October (except those belonging to the fruits that I
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[quote=Konstantinos Karoubas]Apple seeds
The apple seeds were kept in the refrigerator since December 24 in wet/moist sand. They were beginning to form mold.... today they were cleaned/rinsed and will be placed in the fridge until they are planted... hopefully in the next week.

Some of the seeds are from the apples we ate from our farm...but 2/3 were bought from a seed company in Italy.
This is the 1st year I am trying to scarify the apple seeds this way...will see how it goes.

I[/quote]
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[quote=Konstantinos Karoubas]Let's hope for the best Antonio.

We have been hearing about the unusual weather you are having. It will complicate the growth of the new trees...just observe.

It will be interesting to see the outcome.

Long term it will interesting to find what trees and shrubs are best suited for your climate/microclimate.

Did you plant any acorns or wild pear seeds?

Kostas
[/quote]

Hola Kostas!

I could not find acorns. Crazy, being in Spain! But I planted
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Hola Kostas!

I’ve read that this year you plan to try walnuts. Here in Denia , I just buried some walnuts in October and well, at least one of them is sprouting. I did nothing special, no scarify, no stratify, just bury.

I sowed many other things on November 27th. Some things are sprouting, but I guess I will not identify them until Spring. Except some of them (almond, walnut, peach) that are easy to identify at this moment. I guess everything needs its own time and conditions. And well,
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Hello Kostas

I write just to tell you that I buried many seeds in my property. 30.000 of different species 10 days ago. But, BEFORE that, I buried bunches of almonds, walnuts, chestnut and hazelnut. Yesterday I saw the first Walnut and Almond Sprouting. That rocks 😎
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So, Kostas, how is the October/November planting? Are you going again for 10k seeds to plant? How do you manage it?


I talk everybody about your project.

Here at my place, I planted tons of seeds but it was disappointing to see ants taking seeds away! I was thinking, in order to increase my chances of success, that I should plant 20k biodiverse seeds, in order to have, in the future, a good selection. I dont know if it is better to go nuts, get the 20k seeds and plant them in next weeks.
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Hello Kostas, you can read more on my advances here

https://permies.com/t/145856/Project-Intense-Food-Forest-Mediterranean#1171949

I will read yours on this thread :)
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Wow Kostas! I’ve read the whole thread (I admit it, parts I read them just diagonal) and it is great.

We’ve inherited my grandma’s property in Denia, Alicante, mediterranean town. It was a citrus plantation, now abandoned. We’ve got 2000sq m that belongs to my father and he is negotiating with his brothers to buy the 8.000 belonging to them. I started to plant in our part and create a productive forest. This is mediterranean but rainier than other areas, 700-800mm of rain each year. In our
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Things that are working so far: Cucurbita Ficifola, Sweet Potato, Jerusalem Artichoke, Taro, Asparagus, Swiss Chard, Sea Kale, Artichoke, Wild Rocket, Chicory, Lovage, NZ Spinach, Cabbage, and herbs like mint, oregano, mejorana... maybe I am missing something

I got a bunch of seeds of the recomended mediterranean species on both Toensmeier and Martin Crawford books, got as much as I could, mixed seeds (except Jerusalem, Taro and sweet potato) and threw all in the beds. Maybe this was not the
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[quote=N. Neta][quote=Antonio Hache]Hola! This link might be useful for you. Eric Toensmeier wrote a book on perennial vegetables, and he made a relation of vegetables really to thrive here:

Perennial vegetables[/quote]

Thanks a million, Antonio, for the link.
Much appreciated.[/quote]

Share with us if you experiment with it. I will do the same. I am going to focus most of my vegetable production
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Hola! This link might be useful for you. Eric Toensmeier wrote a book on perennial vegetables, and he made a relation of vegetables really to thrive here:

Perennial vegetables

My experience with perennials: artichoke, asparagus, rumex , dandelion, chicory...

I want to dive on this subjet and plant as many as possible around here ☺️
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[quote=Michelle Heath]Our growing climates are too far apart to really give specific advice, but I'll offer a few pointers.

First, compile a list of the food your family likes to eat and then make an estimate of how many plants you would need.  Then maybe using graph paper and recommended spacing, determine the space needed.  In your climate you can grow year-round but I'm sure everything has a season where it grows best.  Are you growing for fresh eating or for storage/preserving as well? [/quote]
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Hello everybody!

I have this project of forest garden Mediterranean Food Forest

I aim for all perennials, but we want to have some room for annuals. First we made vegetable beds between tree rows, because we wanted to create a CSA or something alike. But with all the covid restrictions we had to change focus and now we decided to have annuals only for family consumption.

The way we had it (beds between
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[quote=Eric Hanson]Antonio,

I don't have your particular vining weed, but I do have Japanese Honeysuckle which is terribly invasive by me.  What has worked for me is to pull the vines out, roots and all, and keep pulling till I find the "center", or main taproot that sprouted out all the vines.  I don't know if you are in a position to so so, but for me, pulling just a few feet of JH was not enough.  I had to pull every single part of the weed to get it under control.  I had a similar issue[/quote]
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[quote=Douglas Alpenstock]We're in an endless battle with bindweed, but it's mostly a nuisance. Sounds like some of you folks are battling the spawn of Godzilla. Yikes.

BTW, reading the title of this thread, I thought it was about battling Internet trolls. Shows you where my brain is.[/quote]

Yep, it is like Godzilla indeed! I've seen them kill a 20m Pine or an old Olive. It is terrible. And itchy!
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[quote=bruce Fine]the problem is trying to eradicate the invasive species. the roots become entangled with roots of large mature trees. the ones I have that look just like grapes when I cut it back at the base 3 or 4 more grow back where the re was just 1 previously.
maybe some experts have some advice how to get rid of these problem vines.[/quote]

Yes, the more I fight them, thw more they grow
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My feeling is that I have to introduce some better species to occupy the soil. But I am completely lost
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Hi all!

We are becoming desperate with the invasion of two aggressive creepers: araujia sericifera and galium triclorum. They grow as hell, in shadow, under cypress leaves or pine seeds, they climb over trees and kill them, and they are more every day

We spend a ridicoulous amount of time weeding them one by one, but there are more and more every day.

I thought that the best defense is a good attack and maybe I could seed some non aggressive species able to grow in shadowy/acid soils,
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[quote=Hans Quistorff]try this search[/quote]
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[quote=s. lowe]If you search for Sepp Holder Water is Life on YouTube I'm fairly certain that video shows him spreading his seed mix.[/quote]

I will check it!
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Hi guys! I’m becoming more and more interested in finding bibliography, videography and all methodologies on direct seed sowing on soil.

I’ve read that is common in Syntropic agriculture, also that Sepp Holzer likes to disperse seeds here and there, Lawton likes too to plant bunches of seeds some time... but I can’t fine any single methodology, “how-to” or step by step guide. Things like seeds mixes, density, spacing...

I want to go deeper on this because I think that whatever grows on
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