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Tereza Okava
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

Another person who loves the story of food, people, etc.

A few years ago I discovered the magical food that is the oatcake, and this article talked about some variations and gave a few links for you to experiment with how you like yours. Oatcakes, of all varieties, touch a little button in the middle of my soul, not sure why but they are a fabulous comfort food. I haven`t cooked through all the links in this article, but I`ve used it as a starting point to experiment. Maybe you`ll find it useful. https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2014/aug/27/how-to-cook-perfect-oatcakes-recipe
William Bronson
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

Pearl,  if you ever make an exception for a video, Townsend's would be worthwhile.
The whole channel is exceptional.
Pearl Sutton
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

Scott Foster wrote:I'm not sure if you like origin stories but I've been reading a lot about hard and soft grains lately. I have never tried milling my own grain but it's on the list.
...  
I may be lame but this is a fascinating subject.


I  think it's fascinating too, I added it to my look up list, as I don't like video, I'll find text I can read on it. I hadn't looked up oat flour. Thank you for the ideas!  And if you are lame, so am I! Weird food history geeks of the world unite!! :D
Scott Foster
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

I'm not sure if you like origin stories but I've been reading a lot about hard and soft grains lately. I have never tried milling my own grain but it's on the list.

Here is a video on the origin of Oat Cakes in the Scotch Highlands  


In the colonial United States Corn was the main crop used to make johnnycakes that evolved from the Scottish Oatcake.  The history is really interesting.  

Here is a video from one of my favorite youtube channels "Townsends," Discussing the Johny Cake or the food of the downtrodden.



Here is another Townsend's video discussing ash cakes made by soldiers on the move and travelers.  Russians soldiers preferred rye and would make huge batches in common ovens.  I may be lame but this is a fascinating subject.



Genevieve Higgs
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

When I ate meat it was my favorite for "breading" chicken prior to baking.  It seemed to hold in the flavour superbly.  Also great in brownies
Carla Burke
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

I'm not sure how it would be, in a yeast bread, but I've no doubt it would be great in quick breads, muffins, cookies, etc. John and I eat keto, but every once in a while, we want something baked, for a quick carb-up, to throw our bodies a curveball & reignite the weightloss. Unfortunately, I can't have wheat, anymore*, so I'm exploring other options. Almond & coconut flours are great, unless I'm trying to carb-up - and, I do have a real love of all things 'oaty'. Keep me posted on how it works out, please?

* Not sure if it's a gluten issue, an allergy, or what. It makes me sick for days, so II'm not going to eat it, anymore. I don't need a doctor to tell me not to eat something that makes me sick, and if I can't have part if it, that kinda screws with my 'whole-food' philosophies.
William Bronson
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

I absolutely love  oat flour for pancakes,  and let me add, it makes great waffles!
Crisp outsides, tender insides.
I never have tried it in baked goods,  but I focus on yeast bread.
I'm not sure what the lack of gluten would do for the rise.
Tereza Okava
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

Dang! 50 pounds is a lot of flour!!!

I make the husband's bread, so I often will throw in some oat flour (along with other whole grains). I was on a GF baking kick for a while and went nuts with oats. The pancakes are superlative, I think. I also like using them for Indian dosa-type pancakes (together with some rice flour, for example).
Cake, I think, might be the best application for it. So fine, like you say. I haven't had much luck incorporating more than a tiny bit into my sourdough-- yet. Working on it.
Sonja Draven
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

Yes, I love oat flour! I've been gluten free for many years and it's one of the easiest and most reliable to use. It's especially nice to combine with other flours because of the smooth texture. It can get gummy solo but it also helps take away gritty texture of other grains.

I'm happy you're discovering it too!
Pearl Sutton
Post     Subject: Oat Flour

I bought a 50 pound bag of oat flour. Have never used it before. Made a cake with it, mixed with whole wheat and white flours. That was the most fine textured cake I have made in years, since I quit buying pastry flour. It's a very fine grind, almost powder. Is this normal for it? This is excellent, has anyone else worked with it? Looking forward to bread off it!