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mean I don't have to weed that row much.  Fava beans grow well but every year I have to battle the aphids and I usually lose that battle.  Stallard beans are great with three sisters planting.[/quote
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to weed that row much.  Fava beans grow well but every year I have to battle the aphids and I usually lose that battle.  Stallard beans are great with three sisters planting.

With the fava beans
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beans grow well but every year I have to battle the aphids and I usually lose that battle.  Stallard beans are great with three sisters planting.
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because they have some delay compared to standard pole beans. That is also an advantage when planting them in three sisters since it gives the pole time to grow.

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BRK Day 19

Yesterday I did chop and drop at base camp all morning. The hugels are looking well chopped!
In the afternoon we planted the three sisters on the new hugels at the Abby (woot
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.  

Three sisters mainly with many other seeds added to fill in the growing spaces.
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with a gardener on Facebook to find out if a three sisters lasagna garden is an option with the space I have in case such a garden layout would save myself setup time and resources needed for planting.
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I've actually never done three sisters in a raised bed. I just followed the distancing recommendations (there's a good thread or two here on permies about the spacing). Interestingly enough, my three
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companion planting/ three sisters bed. If there is a link to a detailed guide on this site you can go ahead and share it here. My public library has been closed for two months so I am not able to pick up
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artichoke, tomatoes, cucumbers, and lettuce.

Top tier will soon have summer plantings of three sisters including sunflowers.
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Got any ponds nearby?

I had the kids harvest pond scum and we put in the center of each mound where we planted three sisters.

Indigenous used to put fish carcasses in theirs, but we have
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to try another with corn, peas and pumpkins. Hopefully not too much of a bastardization of the Three Sisters idea. Time will tell.

I am indebted to the other posters in this thread. I hope I am able
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the three sisters in waffle beds near Prescott (Paulden, actually, like Bonnie). It did surprisingly well, although a surprise hard frost in June killed most of the fledgling bean plants. I wanted
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this interesting diagram and comments about three sisters method --> http://www.southwestgardenguide.com/2012/05/how-to-grow-corn.html

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can't wait to try your method.  I am SO excited.

About the three sisters plantings, I'm wondering about depth of planting as well as timing.  Were the squash and beans planted at the same depth
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of my life fell out. My eventual goal was a modern day version of the local Indians "Three Sisters" crop. They grew corn, beans and squash all together. Corn first in the spring, then as soon
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I'd just like to note, I grew three sisters this past year. I do not live in a desert environment, and suffered from not enough sunshine and pooled water in the beds around the edges with all
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the various three sisters in relation to the other. I've tried a waffle garden two years in a row. Once with corn, squash, and beans and one with sunflowers, squash, onions, and radishes. I used mostly seeds
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pits and trenches and such (I grew up in the desert; didn't even know that there WAS such a thing as planting on a hill, LOL), but not deep planting.

Re: when to plant the various three sisters
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of advice. I would mono crop each seed in its own trench on a small scale my first year. Learn what these crops need first as individuals before you try the three sisters. The issue
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to grow the three sisters here in the summer, but it would be even better if I didn't have to irrigate. We have no rain from early June to early October, so it seems like a desert during those months.
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Hello Juanita,

The Three Sisters was another area I was planning on experimenting in. I intended to work these into the the trench planting method, in order to study the ability of the trench
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Hello all.  

Thanks for the great feedback!  Just to clarify, I'm not suggesting that anyone relies on the three sisters unless it's a necessity.  This is more of a thought exercise.   The three
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I've always wanted to try wild Purslane which is supposedly packed with nutrients and which might already be growing in your garden.  This might be the year that I get around to actually trying it. Make sure that you're good with identification because there is another plant that looks very similar and isn't good for you.  One has milky sap and one has clear sap.  

Edit:
I just read Roy Longs post a couple of post above and would like to second his opinion. It certainly sounds like he knows
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[quote=Jamin Grey][quote=Jen Fan]I know people that have been surviving for years on top ramen, cheese, and beer.  I'd be inclined to think corn, beans, and squash would carry you longer and leave you feeling far healthier [/quote]

I'm not a beer-drinker myself - I barely touch any alcohol (don't like the taste, and doesn't sit well in my stomach), and never beers, but I think you'd be surprised how nutritious certain beers are. I forget which one, but one was designed specifically to[/quote]
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You mention feeding a child such a diet...

I grew up in state foster care in the 70's.  My last foster parents were Seventh Day Adventists and they did not believe in eating anything that originates from an animal, ie no butter, cheese, milk, animal fats or oils, no eggs or fish etc etc etc.  I arrived there at 8 1/2 years old weighing 86 pounds...  I left there at ten years old weighing 45 pounds.  My adoptive mother broke into tears the first time I took my shirt off to get ready for bed
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[quote=Jen Fan]I know people that have been surviving for years on top ramen, cheese, and beer.  I'd be inclined to think corn, beans, and squash would carry you longer and leave you feeling far healthier [/quote]

I'm not a beer-drinker myself - I barely touch any alcohol (don't like the taste, and doesn't sit well in my stomach), and never beers, but I think you'd be surprised how nutritious certain beers are. I forget which one, but one was designed specifically to provide sustenance to
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If you add peas, amaranth, (great mineral source, leaves and seeds are edible.) sunflowers, and nasturtiums (for vitamin C, they will grow around the edges of the squash.) to this veggie guild, and get a flock of chickens, you’ll do pretty well.
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Something to keep in mind is that it’s pretty easy to get enough leafy greens during the growing season, but not so easy during the dormant season.  They can be frozen or canned for dormant season use.  Or you can dry them and crumble the dried leaves into soups and stews.  I use a lot of dried parsley, as one example.  

Perennial herbs can add a lot of flavor to an otherwise bland diet and keep you from getting food fatigue, and can all be dried.  
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Right on Scott Perkins. Great that you are making sure you get that much greens into you.  Many would be jealous.  Beets are surely a great addition as well.  I highly recommend beets to anyone who can grow them in their land.  At my place the voles destroy my beet crops. Sometimes they don't even get past the second leaves before they are gone.  if they make it to the appearance of maturity, the voles have often eaten most of the roots right out from underneath the leaves.

When I addressed
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Robert-  I live in Georgia and as a bachelor I am only planting the things I am deficient in.   "Greens"   I am far from undernourished calorie wise and I am a quick eater of fast foods,  eggs
meats and canned and frozen goods but I hardly ever get the nutrition I know I need from fresh leafy greens.   SO, that is why I call my garden the SALAD garden.   Last year I did something
similar and every day I could walk out and pluck the leaves one at a time from the many plants and fill up a bowl
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greens and herbs, but also having other sources of protein and starches than those.  Not that the Three Sisters are bad choices, but I wouldn't put all your eggs into one basket, so to speak, as crops
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If you want to play games with nutrition analysis without too much hard work, head over to https://cronometer.com/ and try out their software.  You do have to create an account, but it's free unless you want to upgrade for the premium features.  "Add a food" to your "diary" by picking from one of several databases (including USDA), and it reports out everything it can find about that food, including individual content of each of the essential amino acids.  A really good resource for free.
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My thinking Melba. Eat the weeds and forage for wild plants while on a walk. A good book on local wild edibles and the SAS handbook for survival will get you lots of information about catching fish and game with traps. If the animals aren't too polluted where you are, you're doing yourself a favor.
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[quote=Scott Perkins][quote=Melba Streiff]Don’t forget about eating the weeds that come up in your Three Sisters patch....lamb’s quarters, creasy greens or wild mustard, chickweed, nettles, etc., etc[/quote][/quote]
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[quote=Melba Streiff]Don’t forget about eating the weeds that come up in your Three Sisters patch....lamb’s quarters, creasy greens or wild mustard, chickweed, nettles, etc., etc.  They have a lot[/quote]
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Don’t forget about eating the weeds that come up in your Three Sisters patch....lamb’s quarters, creasy greens or wild mustard, chickweed, nettles, etc., etc.  They have a lot of good nutrition
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A, and their seeds provide quality vegetable fats that corn and beans lack

https://www.motherearthnews.com/nature-and-environment/three-sisters-corn-beans-squash-zmaz01fmzsel

Well what
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[quote=Larisa Walk] You can do this with dent, flour, even pop corn and sorghum [/quote]


Now I'm tempted to try it with Job's Tears.
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[quote=Mk Neal]For a fascinating description of traditional Hidatsa methods of growing, processing, storing, and cooking the "three sisters"and other native crops, read "Native American Gardening[/quote]
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Someone with more mental energy than I have right now might try making a series of Punnett Squares for a human diet.  They are typically used to determine percentages of different feeds needed to make a complete ration for livestock.  You’ll have to look up links, because I’m on a tablet.
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[quote=Mk Neal]For a fascinating description of traditional Hidatsa methods of growing, processing, storing, and cooking the "three sisters"and other native crops, read "Native American Gardening[/quote]
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For a fascinating description of traditional Hidatsa methods of growing, processing, storing, and cooking the "three sisters"and other native crops, read "Native American Gardening: Buffalobird
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, but they didn't say how it was husked)
2. They tended to harvest the three sisters at the same time (winter storage) and then eat them together in Succotash. Eating the sisters this way leads to better
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I guess for Northamericans this is a known fact (as opposed to Europeans), but for higher nutrition you should look into nixtamalization of the corn:
Nixtamalization
Quote:
Adoption of the nixtamalization process did not accompany the grain to Europe and beyond, perhaps because the Europeans already had more efficient milling processes for hulling grain mechanically. Without alkaline processing, maize is a much less beneficial
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Throw in some easy garden herbs like mint and thyme and maybe basil and cilantro. Etc.  

They won't interfere with the three sisters... in some arrangements they can compliment ground cover(weed
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A, and their seeds provide quality vegetable fats that corn and beans lack

https://www.motherearthnews.com/nature-and-environment/three-sisters-corn-beans-squash-zmaz01fmzsel



Thanks, Galen
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[quote=Joseph Lofthouse]
I just ran a nutritional analysis. If you ate 5 cups each per day of corn mush, cooked pinto beans, and butternut squash, you'd meet your caloric needs, and most vitamin and mineral needs.

However, you would be completely deficient in B12 (from animals), D (which the body can make), and K (from green leafy things). You'd be severely deficient in omega 3/6 oils, and choline.[/quote]

Thanks, Joseph, excellent information.  If you don't mind me asking what tools
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[quote=Catherine Windrose][quote=Scott Foster] Does anyone know what deficiencies you would have if you ate nothing but Dent Corn, Winter Squash, and Dry Beans?[/quote]
This begs more information.  For how long?  A winter, a year, or years?  Are there existing health conditions to consider?  For an adult or a growing child?  

Genetic predisposition(s) could be a factor.  Some individuals don't seem to have a problem with consuming lots of corn, while others become diabetic over time though[/quote]
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[quote=Trace Oswald]Thankfully, no one should have to.  There are so many plants that grow well with very little care and are vitamin and mineral powerhouses that I would never try.  Things like kale are super easy, as are lots of other leaf crops, and as mentioned, potatoes are great.  Filling, lots of calories as vegetables go, mix with lot of other things, great yields.

My own strategy (every year) is grow as many things as possible so that the inevitable failure of some doesn't set me[/quote]
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[quote=Scott Foster] Does anyone know what deficiencies you would have if you ate nothing but Dent Corn, Winter Squash, and Dry Beans?[/quote]
This begs more information.  For how long?  A winter, a year, or years?  Are there existing health conditions to consider?  For an adult or a growing child?  

Genetic predisposition(s) could be a factor.  Some individuals don't seem to have a problem with consuming lots of corn, while others become diabetic over time though I feel that might be more
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Adding bacon and lard to the diet would help too - lots of vitamin D in outdoors-raised pig fat.
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So it sounds like if you added chickens (eggs) to your 3 sisters and fed them on it as well you could probably do it. If you didn't die of boredom of course!
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I just ran a nutritional analysis. If you ate 5 cups each per day of corn mush, cooked pinto beans, and butternut squash, you'd meet your caloric needs, and most vitamin and mineral needs.

However, you would be completely deficient in B12 (from animals), D (which the body can make), and K (from green leafy things). You'd be severely deficient in omega 3/6 oils, and choline.
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Thankfully, no one should have to.  There are so many plants that grow well with very little care and are vitamin and mineral powerhouses that I would never try.  Things like kale are super easy, as are lots of other leaf crops, and as mentioned, potatoes are great.  Filling, lots of calories as vegetables go, mix with lot of other things, great yields.

My own strategy (every year) is grow as many things as possible so that the inevitable failure of some doesn't set me back terribly.  I
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A, and their seeds provide quality vegetable fats that corn and beans lack

https://www.motherearthnews.com/nature-and-environment/three-sisters-corn-beans-squash-zmaz01fmzsel

Thanks, Galen.  Throw
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And of course squash leaves are edible too...
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I know people that have been surviving for years on top ramen, cheese, and beer.  I'd be inclined to think corn, beans, and squash would carry you longer and leave you feeling far healthier  Especially if grown in good soil.  Plants are only as good as the soil they're grown in, IMO!  If you only had 3 survival plants, these wouldn't be bad to rely on.  Plus they're super versatile in their preparation!
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quality vegetable fats that corn and beans lack

https://www.motherearthnews.com/nature-and-environment/three-sisters-corn-beans-squash-zmaz01fmzsel
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Does anyone know what deficiencies you would have if you ate nothing but Dent Corn, Winter Squash, and Dry Beans?

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    Sorry if this is misplaced advice, I don't have the endurance to read through the whole thread. Here's my two cents: using the three sisters (maize, beans, and squash) is more sustainable
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Have you tried growing the beans with the maze like the native americans do?  They use a three sisters system where squash plants cover the ground between the corn stalks and the bean vines are held
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--- Fertilizer vs Compost only
--- Seed Starting Mix vs Compost only
--- Three Sisters vs. Actual practice (ONLY useful if you are NOT harvesting until winter and makes for a poor use of space
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Have some sand piles right now. Thinking I'll get some seed potatoes. Toss them on the ground in a row and wheel barrow sand on top of them. Then I won't be digging in my heavy clay this fall and the ground will end up permanently improved in that row.

I sure hear that about the mice and voles and pocket gophers. I have all three. I don't think that old dodge where parsnips are sweeter left in the ground would work for me. Works fine for a seed crop but I think they often just leave me a
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The energy that I expend on harvesting, threshing, and winnowing wheat is barely above basal metabolism. (Mostly done standing)

The energy that I expend on harvesting potatoes is aerobic, very akin to an exercise class. (Lots of squats, heavy lifting, digging in heavy/hard clay soil, etc).

I could harvest, thresh, winnow wheat all day without exceeding my working capacity. I might be able to harvest potatoes for a couple hours before exhaustion sets in.

Mice eat grains in storage.
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[quote=Joseph Lofthouse]

Digging potatoes is hard work!!!! Harvesting wheat is easy in comparison.

Wheat is easy to store for ages. Potatoes are quite perishable.

[/quote]

Joseph,  I think this came up in a previous thread somewhere on kcal per acre harvested, but would it be fair to say that the kcal spent to harvest and render wheat/potatoes in an 'edible state' (don't know how exactly to define that phrase) were the same in terms of kcal harvested?  Your added comments on
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[quote=Joseph Lofthouse]I finally put on my mathemagician hat...

On a per pound basis, wheat provides 4 times more calories. That is because potatoes are wet, and predominately water, while wheat is overwhelmingly dry matter.

A pound of wheat contains 1500 calories, while a pound of potatoes contains around 340 calories.

A field of wheat produces about 4.3 million kCal/acre. A field of potatoes produces about 7 million KCal/acre. So while the potatoes might be more productive, they[/quote]
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I finally put on my mathemagician hat...

On a per pound basis, wheat provides 4 times more calories. That is because potatoes are wet, and predominately  water, while wheat is overwhelmingly dry matter.

A pound of wheat contains 1500 calories, while a pound of potatoes contains around 340 calories.

A field of wheat produces about 4.3 million kCal/acre. A field of potatoes produces about 7 million KCal/acre. So while the potatoes might be more productive, they are not that much more
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[quote=Scott Foster][quote=William Schlegel]Planted a wheat grex start today.  [/quote]

It looks like a great start William.  What is a grex?[/quote]

I guess I hang out primarily in the plant breeding forum. A grex is a plant breeders genetic mixture. You let it cross and mix up and recombine. Wheat is actually interestingly capable of cross ploidy hybridization. Outcrossing rates are a little lower than in some crops but it does cross.

Historically wheat land races were/are sometimes
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Well, it might be useful to see if it's a weed you can eat.
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[quote=Mike Barkley]I've been playing around with buckwheat for a few years. [/quote]


Great information Mike, I will check out that Cornell link.  It sounds like you have my disease, "throwaseeditis"  I've been known to throw a bag of seeds, crush a flower head and start an entire pack of seeds on a whim.   Haha.  I have some areas that I don't really know what's popping up, could be a perennial seedling, an annual flower or a weed.  


Regards, Scott
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[quote=William Schlegel]Planted a wheat grex start today.  [/quote]

It looks like a great start William.  What is a grex?
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easy to observe the very good reasons the pioneers relied on it. I'll try to grow several other grains this year too but buckwheat is the one I'm relying on most.

More on topic of three sisters
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I think that grass grains are one of the least efficient luxuries in the garden.  If you grow potatoes well, you can get about 1lb per square foot.  So if you're looking for a space-efficient carb/starch that doesn't require fancy tools or extra work, stick with taters.   If you're set on having flour grains though, you can't compare that to a potato.  I haven't tried it yet, though I hoep to this year, but I expect there are other  grains that have a higher yield, like amaranth, millet, and
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Planted a wheat grex start today.

Threw in the following:

Pima Club
Purple Spring (I pulled this out of land race purple winter from Eli Rugosa)
Ethiopian Blue Tinged
Einkorn
Khorasan
Turkey Red
Lofthouse
Sin Et Pheel
White Sonoran
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.  

Folks lived a long time on eating the three sisters.  They can be grown with minimal tools.

Another option, if the conditions allow, is chestnuts.  Chestnuts were a major food source in many
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trying to figure out the pieces so I can put the puzzle together.  There are a lot of variables.

 Potatoes, sweet potatoes, and the three sisters seem to be a good start.  

I think I will just
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Any single crop, depended on without a backup is a potential problem.  Remember the Irish potato famine.  You should aim for at least 3 crops, with each planted in excess so if one totally fails, you can gather by.
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It depends a lot on your area, your knowledge and your preferences.  I like potatoes.  When I had a kid come up with celiacs, my response was "I'm fine with potatoes and rice, I don't need wheat."  My wife however, really felt the lack.  I've read in several survival books that corn is just tougher and easier than wheat.  My problem is that I know a lot more things I can make with wheat than corn.  Some varieties of corn are more demanding than others.  

The 300 lbs of wheat per person is
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We rely heavily on 3 sisters crops here in Minnesota. They do extremely well for us, as does grain sorghum and amaranth. Cereal grains in small plantings are targeted by birds and unless you're growing a field of them you won't have any left to eat, so for that reason we buy millet and oats. Sorghum does well with minimal rainfall, amaranth can survive some drought, corn needs more water. Planting all of them covers the bases. Beans like water except in the dry down stage, but even in a wet
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@John Weiland wow those numbers in that table are very very low for grains in kg per hectare less than 1/2 of the average yield here.

While I do grow barley, rye and peas I don't grow them as staples or together, I don't think together would work well as the harvest times are different, and they all have to be harvested exactly when they are ready or you lose the crop. Rye (Barley as well) is the main grain in much of northern Europe, wheat historically does not grow well here and was
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[quote=S Bengi] ....it is what saved us during the hard time as a species so we have a certain reverence and love towards it.[/quote]

A fairly significant factor in the discussion I wager. :-)

A table that *may* aid the home producer, yet as Joseph L. and others alluded to, context/region of cultivation is important when considering yield/nutrition at your location:

http://www.gardeningplaces.com/articles/nutrition-per-hectare1.htm

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I guess that's how the native Americans survived so long with success producing corn, beans and squash, the three sisters, it was manageable with the labor that they could put into it.
all I know
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[quote=Skandi Rogers][quote=Scott Foster]John,

I'm seeing other numbers up to 300 lbs per person.  

Scott[/quote]
the key staples here were rye, barley and peas.
[/quote]

I looked into Rye and Barley, can you suggest a white paper or a website that discusses this trio?  I know that Rye is popular in Germany, Poland, and Russia but it seems to be used mainly as livestock feed in the U.S.  Are you using Rye, Barley, and Peas in a polyculture or are they planted
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You can graze wheat stubble, but I don't think it would be adequate feed for non-ruminants like rabbits.

You can feed flour corn to rabbits supposedly- I read this somewhere, haven't tried it.

Wheat can go a very long time without fertilization but yields are lower in consequence. My grandpa didn't used to fertilize his he ran some trials and the fertilizer didn't pay. The farmers who rent his fields now do fertilize and use more modern equipment and perhaps varieties. They get a lot
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,  as it keeps a long time and you can make booze and bread out of it.
I think wheat is considered  a more complete food than corn.

I have never grown the three sisters, but I have grown corn
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With the use of secateurs, tarps, buckets, and sticks, I can harvest, thresh, and clean enough wheat in an hour to feed me for a week.

I could probably feed myself for a month with the same labor when growing corn.

I can grow wheat without irrigation. I have to have irrigation to grow corn.

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Harvesting 1/10 of an acre per person, this doesn't seem extreme
Threshing
Winnowing
Milling

You are correct wheat is grass seed, desert/famine/wartime hunger food. Way too much work to get food from it, but it is what saved us during the hard time as a species so we have a certain reverence and love towards it.
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ration of a loaf of bread, pound of meat per day kind of thing.

One reason for wheat may be where the literature was written, for me the three sisters would be straight starvation, we cannot grow
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I think wheat consumption varies significantly from person to person.  To really know, just keep track of how much you use for a week or month and do the math.  I think the missus and I go through about 50 lbs per year total.

300 lbs per person is a huge amount.  That would be eating nearly a pound of wheat a day.  Or at least it seems like a huge amount to me.....
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I imagine, if we are speaking of direct consumption, much depends on pancakes, pastas, cake, pie, etc. My wife and I seldom eat any of those. In this past week we have consumed 1.5 pounds of bread and 1/2 pound of pasta.  I would say that is typical for us.  So that would be a little over 100 pounds a year for the two of us.  But, I am willing to add in a few more pounds for error.  My mother was Bohemian and my wife's mother was Irish.   Soup is a large portion of our diet.
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John,

Interesting information on grain consumption.  Would you say you only use 75lbs because of your other gardening, or animal husbandry measures, or because you can buy or barter for the other things you consume?  

The minimum amount of wheat per person I can find is in an LDS Emergency Food Pamphlet.  I'm seeing other numbers up to 300 lbs per person.  Honestly, I have no idea.  I know I use 3 1/2 cups of wheat flour for bread and that's usually with a cup of oats thrown in.

It
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I tend to agree that it is difficult to grow, harvest,  and process grain crops on a small scale.   That said, over the centuries many have done just that with a minimum of tools. With occasional slips, my wife and I use about 75 pounds of wheat, each, during a year. Our greatest direct consumption would never pass 100 pounds each.
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We planted buckwheat as a cover crop and let it go to seed years ago. It was pretty easy to grow. I don't think it would be terribly complicated.

Just getting started with Salsify myself mainly because of that same list. Have a couple plants up from some seed I seeded last fall. Planted another packet already this spring. Also fall seeded some leek seed but not sure if that was a good idea.
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Good input William,

When I said hand tools I meant your typical, shovel, hoe, rake and scythe.    I think all of the grains would be supplemental unless you use machines or animals, then you're looking at needing fossil fuel or more grain.  It feels like a board game.

That's an interesting list of vegetables from bio-intensive.   I have potatoes, sweet potatoes, garlic, and sunchokes on my list of cornerstone vegetables but I didn't think of the others. Honestly, I've never heard of
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nice YouTube videos. However in terms of getting enough calories they don't rely on wheat or the three sisters. They use space efficient high calorie root crops and I think they list only seven
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Most of the survival garden literature I'm reading suggest wheat as a solid cornerstone crop for a survival garden.  Maybe I have a blind spot, this isn't making a lot of sense unless you have a tractor or a team of horses.

1100 sq ft of garden space will produce 60lbs of wheat.  You'd need 3300 sqft to provide the suggested annual storage of wheat for one person, 150 lbs per year.

Under ideal conditions, 1100 sq ft will produce 660 lbs of Irish potatoes. (MSU)


Somebody school me on
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So, I'm creating a bit of a hybrid system for the standard Large Grains, Fabaceae, Cucurbitaceae, and King Stropharia guild.

I'm starting by digging holes in the lawn 1 ft deep, 2 ft wide, and 4.5 ft apart on centers in a loose grid over a large area. The soil and sod are set aside on a tarp. I'm filling the holes with woody debris, leaves, and topping the wood with year old manure that was digested by BSF. Then the dead sod goes on top of the wood and manure. The soil removed from the
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the bean smothered the corn.  I also think I planted to much in not a large enough area.  So my advice for three sisters is make sure you plant the corn first and it all is up out of the ground before
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?
The farmer wants to make another one of these, will it be good to grow the three sisters in them? The three sisters i think about are corn, patisson, which are some kind of courgettes or pumpkins
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that for a week due to hot weather and fussy kids. Today, my parents came over, and my mom helped me get the bed ready to go. I wanted to try a three sisters-type bed...which made cutting Xs kind of hard to fathom
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-20200317_165130.jpg width=500 Three Sisters and Asparagus Beds

How it was made:  Both were made by growing potatoes. I removed as many weeds (blackberry
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[quote=Steve Thorn][quote=Bryant RedHawk]The three sisters (corn, beans, squash); sunflowers, beans, basil, tarragon; tomatoes, peppers, melons. [/quote]

Which plant do you grow melons on?[/quote[/quote]
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The three sisters have different plant dates so they shouldn't all grow at the same time. The corn goes in first then a few weeks later the beans are planted then a few weeks after that, the squash
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i keep last season's okra stalks to grow winter peas on. Works a charm. I cant seem to get all Three Sisters to grow at the same time, otherwise I would do that all at once.
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[quote=Steve Thorn][quote=Bryant RedHawk]The three sisters (corn, beans, squash); sunflowers, beans, basil, tarragon; tomatoes, peppers, melons. [/quote]

Which plant do you grow melons on?[/quote[/quote]
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[quote=Bryant RedHawk]The three sisters (corn, beans, squash); sunflowers, beans, basil, tarragon; tomatoes, peppers, melons. [/quote]

Which plant do you grow melons on?
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]

The three sisters (corn, beans, squash); sunflowers, beans, basil, tarragon; tomatoes, peppers, melons.
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the berries, which were used as fuel, into the stream.
    I suggest food forest (and just forest) to stabilize the slopes.
    Using three sisters is a good start, sunflowers and amaranth
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.
Currently many of the families are only planting corn here so I want to introduce them to the three sisters...

However on the steep slopes there is a large problem with water retention and run off
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. I'm thinking about doing a different "theme" in each section. So far I've come up with "salsa garden," three sisters, "salad bar," "homemade pickles," and something else I can't remember right now.
I
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are tomatoes, zuccini, cucumbers, the "three sisters", and some new fruit trees and shrubs, which I will plant in spring. Each of these areas will need a different amount of water so I guess it's better
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tribes throughout north america (and probably central as well, since all three crops were mesoamerican in origin) were known for 'three sisters' type plantings. there are so many languages
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by permaculture, in other languages, according to their roots? For example, the "three sisters" planting system was invented by Native Americans, as far as I know... they must have a word
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domesticated and why, or how the Native Americans invented the "three sisters" idea, etc.

Basically, I want to show all the fundamental ideas of permaculture but in a way that a 10yo can
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and included in the  livestock delivery business that pays  far below the poverty line. The three sisters would meet people in town and they're always very surprised to discover that Vilma had daughters
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at each trophic level, or they need to come ripe at the same time, as is the case with traditional Three Sisters plantings, which, unless I am wrong, was intended to grow untended until harvest, when
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hau Kate, The way we plant is "open grouping", born from the three sisters style. We generally have each plant species in groups of 4 to 6 plants with enough space between for bug deterrent plants
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At Three Sisters Farm our main crop was a Salad of the Season. It always had a base of lettuce with 12- 20 other seasonal  greens. they diversity of ingredients allowed us to keep the restaurants
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Farm and their bioshelter in Pittsburgh in recent years. Their bioshelter is much smaller than mine at Three Sisters Farm but it suits their needs well. see Garfieldcommunityfarm.com
for more info on that.
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Next year, I'm planning on using a modified three sisters method to save garden space and train pole beans up my popcorn stalks. I would like to know what would be a typical yield by weight for dry
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of it onto one large bed. Plan to grow an amazing three sisters garden there next year.  All mulched with woodchips of course.

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!

For that reason, I not only know My Little Ponies, I also know all the names of Barbies and her three sisters, and their whole back-story like where they came from (Wisconsin), and why they do not have
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, and beans. In order to save space on planting, I plan on intercropping my flint corn and popcorn with pole beans to maximize use of space. I cannot use the full three sisters method though since I'll have
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Crop and pasture rotation

We may want to give the land a break from crop production sometimes, and turn it into pasture for a year or more. Because I'm looking at a minimum of 25 acres, this would mean switching the operation to different areas of the farm. We would still plant every day and harvest every day, weather permitting.

I imagine doing this, mainly to break pest cycles and to facilitate improvements in tilth. It would also facilitate any harvesting of wood within the
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That could be. During wet weather it seems like a place mold would like to live.

But I think it's more that people just use immature specimens from the longer keeping squashes. I found out a couple days ago that I have eaten loofah several times. I mentioned to Nova that some people eat loofah when it's immature and she told me that's the one we had in our stew that looks like a big cucumber. I saw these squashes, but I've only ever really seen loofah as a bathroom scrubber.

I was
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chayote is indeed great, and grows like crazy. i keep a few growing in the yard for greens for the rabbits, cutting it regularly. I don`t really enjoy eating it, but it`s supposedly good for heart and cholesterol stuff (prob just because it is like 99% water) and you can make decent pickles out of it. It stands in for cukes and zukes when the mold and humidity don`t allow you to grow them.
Mold may also be an issue with the squash, that might be why you`re not seeing zucchini type veg locally.
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I've decided that I must have chayote squash.

Last night, my wife told me that she planted chayote in black soil when she was 12 or 13. It grew huge and covered a Jackfruit tree. There was no official count but she said it was hundreds of fruits per year and they came in every month.

So, I questioned her about this black soil. It's a spot behind the house of her employer, where she was putting all of the kitchen waste and the ashes from indoor and outdoor fires. She also cleaned up the
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The harrow may not be necessary. I wouldn't drag it over crop residue. After everything is harvested within 4 inches of the ground, and pigs have been on it for a day, The harrow would be dragged around more as a levelling device and manure spreading device. That may turn out to be a hand hoe instead. I wouldn't expect to use the harrow if there's a ground cover of sweet potato or some other perennial cover.

It seems a reasonable step down in tillage from the moldboard plowing followed by
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Good ideas.

Just a few observations:

1. [quote]Because it's a tropical setting, with moisture available all year, this can be a continuous system, although I might want to break it up with buckwheat or some other cover crop occasionally, to prevent problems with disease. Buckwheat can be used for a short rotation, or sweet potatoes for a long rotation. [/quote] This is going to be necessary. The warmth of the tropics processes out organic material so fast, the mulch from your alley
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Best case scenario, for managing soil erosion and cover cropping, would be to have a mixture of something like amaranth, buckwheat and clover, that could take over whenever the three sisters
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to guess what month it is.
........
All of the Three Sisters plants work in the Philippines as almost ripe crops. Many beans are grown to near maturity, to a point where the pod is leathery and the seed
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I haven't forgotten about Chris. He's just very good at asking things that are specific.
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I've already anticipated that. I would definitely set prices. But people there are very price conscious. Within 1 kilometre there might be 10 vegetable vendors in some places, so anyone who isn't pretty close to the right price, won't sell one item. I think a more common problem might be that they will drop the prices to the point where none of them make any money. So I will instruct everyone to keep their price at a certain point, until maybe the last few hours on the night before they will be
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Just a suggestion......... some commercial vendors in the US use the method of buying back what doesn't sell (think bread and milk), but they set the retail prices. And that is for a simple reason -- since the retailer has no risk, they would ask sky high prices, so of course much of the product wouldn't sell. I experienced a bit of this phenomena myself. I was supplying green beans and pumpkins to my local farmers market vendors. I guaranteed that I would buy back what they didn't sell. I
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We will try luffa, but mostly for finished sponges. They will probably be done on trellises, but I intend to try many different things in polyculture to see what thrives.
.....
I like luffa sponges because they ship flat. Add water and they will pop up. Once we are harvesting wood, we will try making back scrubbers and various other things that use luffa. We make soap. Soap can be poured over sliced loofah to produce an abrasive bar.

Luffa sponges are in use, but I didn't see many being
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My concern with the three sisters model has to do with the set-it-and-forget-it nature of its application for producing dried crops and winter squash. You are living in a place where field corn
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loofa might work. I have to rip it out or else it will go indefinitely here and I only have so much space. You can process the gourds green (after a brief drying in the sun to reduce moisture), as long as they are big enough to be useful to you, and still get a great final product from them. You'll need sponges for washing dishes on your farm, and you could sell them (plus they store from year to year). It could be a good alternative crop for switching out with something else intermittently.
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Buy-Back agreement with vegetable vendors.

I have probably gone to vendor stands in the Philippines 300 times. They often run out of staple items, like corn, beans and squash, that the market wants. And I think I know why.

There is no shortage of these products in the fields or at the wholesalers. The problem is that mark-ups are not huge and vendors don't want to get stuck with unsold merchandise, that will spoil. So, they play it safe, ordering less than the amount likely to
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times, before being tilled in and the Three Sisters returning.

So long as the dominant weeds are edible, it would be great to have something spring back and cover the ground within a few days
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I'm a very wary of Napier grass and will only use it if it's already part of the environment.

We will grow whichever variety of beans are most popular, for human consumption. That's probably going to be mung beans and soybeans. There are also some very long beans which are popular, but I think we will grow those on a trellis.

Blocks of green beans may also be produced, but not in with corn and other long season crops, because they can be ready to harvest in as little as 40 days and are
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Great to hear that you try this out!

Check out the push-pull system, here for a non-scientific https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Push%E2%80%93pull_agricultural_pest_management
Planting Napier grass around would feed your cattle, desmodium as well, or beans woud feed you.

Luffa is also used in the tropics to climb on maize, and used as food. Could partly replace the squash, and climbs like the beans.

Which beans do you intend to use?

I always ask if I can visit gardens, I am amazed how
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work together, producing saleable items and residues that could form a fairly complete diet, for goats and pigs.

I keep coming back to the three sisters of corn, beans and squash.

It could
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://mvac.uwlax.edu/past-cultures/native-knowledge/garden/three-sisters/
https://epapers.uwsp.edu/thesis/2007/Martinez.pdf
but no planting diagrams unfortunately

My own experience:
2016 I trialled a 2m
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Hello, I started my first garden last summer, and I enjoyed it a lot. I want to try having a three-sisters or four-sisters garden next Spring. I'm a bit of an amateur historian, and growing heirloom
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I stumbled upon videos by Dr. Mount Pleasant while researching the three sisters planting system. She is an expert in the field of native agricultural systems, both in academia and in conducting
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for sale. (With the drought here, a lot of Farmers are destocking, and it's Spring)

3. Plant the three sisters: corn, beans and pumpkins, and other crops on a rotational basis - organic crops to maximise
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. With most vegetable crops, most of biomass is removed: therefore use cover crops or intercropping to fill the void, or import biomass from elsewhere.
Example: Three sisters (Milpa). maize produces
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in the original "Three Sisters" grouping. The added benefit being that as the buffalo gourd's spread they will provide surface cover to keep the rainfall from pounding more soil off the slopes. The optional plants
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Looking back at the original post, I have found possible solution for the upright in the three sisters setup. Sesbania.
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here, for winter squash grown this way...

Third, three sisters turned into one lonely sister. The corn got about knee high and crapped out. The only thing doing OK was some sorghum I planted
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of lime and 1/3 yard scoop of rock dust every 8 feet- except I ran out of rock dust part way. Second is a 24" layer of chips from last summer set up as a three sisters garden, amended as above, maybe
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containing corn, beans, and squash, colloquially and conventionally known as the Three Sisters, add some bee balm or other bee-friendly plant, and call it done, and on the small scale, with added
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I'm doing three sisters with corn, millet and sorghum. OK scratch that, the corn got eaten by some worm, the millet didn't work (probably planted too early and rotted) and the sorghum is tall
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I am trying to add some diversity into my three sisters planting by adding millet and amaranth. I want to grow a useful amount however, to vary the diets of all livestock (in include us in that).  My
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other sites seem to talk about when discussing the 3 sisters method.

http://blogs.cornell.edu/garden/lessons/curricula/the-three-sisters-exploring-an-iroquois-garden/how-to-plant-the-three-sisters
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.

There are a few tricks to three sisters and I’m not certain it would work for everyone or anyone with subpar genetics. The first trick is only winter storage varieties. You want to harvest all
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Is the squash element of the three sisters meant to provide the beans protection from invasive deer?

I came to this conclusion this summer from observing a 3 sisters garden on a hillside swale
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Thanks for all the latest replies. Great info!

[quote=Alder Burns]I have had success with three sisters gardens, and derivations on them, in Georgia for years. The main point to bear in mind[/quote]
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I have had success with three sisters gardens, and derivations on them, in Georgia for years. The main point to bear in mind is that the goal was durable, storable produce for winter use and beyond
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Coming from the region that three sisters originated, yes its very doable in the right climate. A common mistake is to use intensive gardening methods when trying to achieve a three sisters planting
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the entire field was cockleburs, tumbleweeds, and a number of other prickly plants that we had no desire to encourage (except for the lowest corner, where I'd tried some waffle beds and three sisters
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to the traditional three sisters method for growing is wildcrafted Summer squash.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ViaW12Jcu0o

He originally found the free-growing plants on vines
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[quote=Amjad Khan]Mr. Redhawk and all, I have a question about the three sisters and I hope this is a good place to ask it, as you've mentioned the growing style in the main post. "They even planted[/quote]
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rot in place to return those nutrients to the soil.
They even planted in the Three Sisters style, where each plant supported others that were planted as neighbors. This kept soil healthy and alive
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Mr. Redhawk and all, I have a question about the three sisters and I hope this is a good place to ask it, as you've mentioned the growing style in the main post. "They even planted in the Three
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of, they let rot in place to return those nutrients to the soil.
They even planted in the Three Sisters style, where each plant supported others that were planted as neighbors.
This kept The soil
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raw foods and its seemingly happened in a natural steady progression without even having to try.
   I got some exciting news from home that my three sisters hugel started bearing some golden
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.

Then, describing polyculture, as mixed plantings, people start to get the difference between "mono" and "poly." It seems the most common thing folks have heard of besides row crops is "three sisters:"  corn
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will combine the taste and productivity of Yellow crookneck squash with the vining habit of ornamental gourds. Vining squash is also more suitable for growing using the traditional three sisters method
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I ever taught my youngest brother (almost twenty years younger than me) was that of the Three Sisters. He was watching me work in the garden as I was babysitting, and he was interested, so I told him
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or enhance some production .
   
I have planted things all together some years they do good some they don't.

which brings  up the three sisters garden most that try this don't understand
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patch. So I would assume you are low in nitrogen. I use fish emulsion mixed in compost tea for spot application when things look yellow. It's happening in my attempt at a three sisters garden in fresh
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Kia ora Donald! good to see more Kiwis at permies....

I used to use scrap carpeting quite a bit for my no-till three sisters plots to suppress the pasture prior to sowing in spring. I stopped
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of species of vegetables, flowers, and beneficial companion plants, as well as 25lbs of bell beans and handfuls of native nw wildflowers, sunflowers, peas, and other legumes. It includes many three
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This year I have tried a three-sisters plot, that I planted in a spiral.  I took a 2" piece of PVC pipe, wrapped a 10' piece of string around it, tied a pencil to the other end, shoved the pipe
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necessary. I'm talking max 10 ears out of the 20 some i planted. The three sisters was an abject failure, beans did not want to come up with the corn, squash was moldy, things washed off the hills and came
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variations on three sisters and also trying some interspersing with rabbit fodder (rye). I'm resigned to assisting in pollinating, since I know I need more plants closer than the 4-per-hill I have
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Remember that the original Three Sisters design and it's relatives mostly assume corn, beans, and winter squash being grown for dry, storable yields of dry corn and beans and mature squash.  Often
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