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up your own family. This has happened with all three sisters in her family. There's the three of them and then there are their best friends who aren't related. None of them spend much time with blood
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. If that's not a disease process, I'm not sure what it is.
https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa47.htm

[quote=Dale Hodgins]
The three sisters had some long chats as they worried about what[/quote]
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much along the slopes so they don't need more chainsaws .

The three sisters had some long chats as they worried about what people in the village think. So I told them that I was pretty sure
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of well known songs drives them nuts.
..........
This is a family without a father or any strong male. The brother, is the weakest of the bunch due to his mental condition. The three sisters have been
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If you use determinant tomato vines you can substitute them for the beans in the three sisters plantings, but you will need to use something like hemp twine to tie the vine to the corn stalk without
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Thanks Bryant - that's helpful!
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I place the corn down the middle with beans about a hand width from the corn plant stalk, the squash go at the edge of the bed on both sides centered in relation to the corn stalks. (think of the corn stalks as eyes and the squash as the nose tip)

On our farm we have raised beds and no mounds.
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Hi all,

I would like to try out a variation of the "three sisters" (corn, bean, squash). Most of the techniques I have read about use mounds (e.g. different methods listed here: https
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necessary. I'm talking max 10 ears out of the 20 some i planted. The three sisters was an abject failure, beans did not want to come up with the corn, squash was moldy, things washed off the hills and came
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variations on three sisters and also trying some interspersing with rabbit fodder (rye). I'm resigned to assisting in pollinating, since I know I need more plants closer than the 4-per-hill I have
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Remember that the original Three Sisters design and it's relatives mostly assume corn, beans, and winter squash being grown for dry, storable yields of dry corn and beans and mature squash.  Often
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I like polyculture and plant my trees that way, using guilds.  One thing I don't do, is mix up a bunch of plants together in my annual garden beds just for the sake of it.  I've tried the three
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In the three sisters type planting you plant the corn and let it come up and get growing, then  you plant the beans then you plant the squash, this allows each of the crop plants to get established
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Mr. Redhawk and all, I have a question about the three sisters and I hope this is a good place to ask it, as you've mentioned the growing style in the main post. "They even planted in the Three
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of, they let rot in place to return those nutrients to the soil.
They even planted in the Three Sisters style, where each plant supported others that were planted as neighbors.
This kept The soil
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Two of the three sisters, native grown and market grown , in Wyoming.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qd-4pZxZy6s
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[quote=Bryant RedHawk]Travis, how are you storing those apples?

We have racks built so that there is only one layer per rack and air space between each rack.
The racks themselves are made with slatted bottoms so air can go through each layer as well as all around it.
Potatoes we put into sand same as carrots and beets, this keeps them separated and nicely firm all winter long.

My new root cellar (not dug yet) will be large enough that I will need at least 4 air exchange tubes maybe[/quote]
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Currently reading "Uses of Plants by the Hidatsa's of the Northern Plains" which is a new publication based on Gilbert Livingston Wilson's extensive unpublished notes.

Interesting! The editor thinks the original squash of the Hidatsa people was a pepo squash and that maxima squash came in during relatively modern times though he himself got some seed for maxima squash from some traditional Gardeners in the 1970s.

I grew Mandan squash a pepo landrace this year. Saved a lot of seeds if
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Travis, peaches incredibly perishable.  They are not an item that you can cold store at all, just doesn't happen.  I grew up in an area that produced a lot of stone fruit, primarily apricots.  It is now Silicon Valley.  Nevertheless, peaches were always sullfured and driec on wood trays historically.  You can dry peaches without sulfuring, but they generally will turn an unappealing brown.  The dried fruit you buy packaged in stores now days are industrially processed, processes primarily
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Travis, how are you storing those apples?

We have racks built so that there is only one layer per rack and air space between each rack.
The racks themselves are made with slatted bottoms so air can go through each layer as well as all around it.
Potatoes we put into sand same as carrots and beets, this keeps them separated and nicely firm all winter long.

My new root cellar (not dug yet) will be large enough that I will need at least 4 air exchange tubes maybe as many as 10, just
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[quote=Abbey Battle]
My soil is horribly infertile, not really good for growing anything which is why it was so cheap and has historically been used for grazing and as a quarry. (Also iron ore extraction). The top soil is only a couple of inches deep before you hit sandstone. Saving grace is that there is a lot of water.

My orchard, (which is only 2 years old and yet to start producing fruit), is about an acre in size. I've planted other edibles around the edge, (again, too young to have[/quote]
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[quote=Travis Johnson]

It is a two step process; how to grow your own food, but also how to preserve it. For us the latter part has proven to be more frustrating then the former.
[/quote]

Same here.  I can easily grow 1000lbs of squash, but then what?  And that is just one food.  Growing is by far the easier part for me.  And much more enjoyable.
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For me trying to do anything 100% is going to be a headache as growing my own tea chocolate and bannas is never going to happen . So my plan is simply each year to try to do more and more gradually increasing how much we have of each crop and the number of different crops , building soil and fertility . Same with preserving stuff , we are building up the amount we " can " pickle chutney , compote ,dry and stock plus move to perennials .

David
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Yes - preservation of food is very problematic. I've just invested in a new chest freezer and an apple store (very small tool shed). But what to do with seasonal gluts? I'm not great on cooking / presering. I tend to eat raw. Eggs i can't use at the pace my chooks lay at. I give most of my eggs away. Apples and pears get given away as well.

My soil is horribly infertile, not really good for growing anything which is why it was so cheap and has historically been used for grazing and as a
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For my family of 6, (2) adults and (4) kids 4-12, we have found the actual growing of the food is not the hard part, it is the preservation of the food that has proven difficult on a larger scale.

Canning works well, but it takes a lot of time, and that is difficult in the middle of summer when running hither and thither with the kids, running a farm, and even wanting to do it when canning produces so much heat on already hot days. Even then the canning supplies can be expensive when getting
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I love the idea of growing all ones own food, but I'm afraid in practice I would get so so bored, there's so much stuff that my climate will not allow me to grow outside a greenhouse or in some cases (peppers) without suplimental heat inside a greenhouse, That I just wouldn't do it. I do however know that I could grow enough vegetables and potatos for us two on way under half an acre, simply by scaling up what we already grow on a much smaller amount of land. That doesn't include and animal
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hau William

I like the sq. Yd. measurements, especially since you can differentiate actual growing space from overall space (walkways and the like).
I recently measured the orchard area, it covers about 3500 sq. yds. currently and within that area there will end up some garden beds between trees.
Most of our fruit trees are full size trees and when grown they will shade a lot of ground, but at that point that ground will be perfect for growing herbs that need some shade in our Southern
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Bryant it sounds like you are a pro at this! 2 acres is a pretty good size garden. I just calculated my current garden at about 2,500 square yards.

There are 4,840 square yards to an acre. So my current garden is about 1/2 acre.

The reason I am using square yards is there is a diagram in the back of "Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden" in which dimensions are given for 7 gardens. Those gardens ranged from about 792 square yards to about 6,510 square yards with an average of about 2,981 square
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.

The three sisters is just one part of First peoples gardening strategies, there are others that go along with that one.
When you think about the three sisters, you see the relationship of those
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I have my copy of "Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden" out lately and have been thinking a lot about three sisters gardening lately. Also have thought a lot about how to grow all your own food. Some
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[quote=Andrew Michaels]Joseph, I notice that you plant corn, beans, and squash in your fields, but do not seem to mix them up, three sisters style. Can I ask if you've ever tried to do so and what[/quote]
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[quote=Joseph Lofthouse][/quote]

Joseph, I notice that you plant corn, beans, and squash in your fields, but do not seem to mix them up, three sisters style. Can I ask if you've ever tried to do
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I was thinking of repurposing some of my large front yard into a three sisters corn spiral this spring.  But I'd love to try this cultivar, if actually available.
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a new garden area (not enough planning), it was supposed to be a three sisters plot, but one a slightly larger scale (15x20 feet?).  I had too many days of too much wind, and most of the corn plants
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-quarters), amaranth, sunflower, little barley, maygrass, dropseed, and erect knotweed. They added beans and squash to their crops around 1200. As cultivation of maize, beans, and squash, the "Three Sisters
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artichoke. I have no idea how it got there, but I think it's great!)

I’ve got tomatoes sprouting up amongst my Three Sisters this year - how funny!
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is written by Darrell Frey, the owner of Three Sisters Farm in Pennsylvania. He is a design consultant and a permaculture teacher who believes that in order to ensure food security and restore
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is written by Darrell Frey, the owner of Three Sisters Farm in Pennsylvania. He is a design consultant and a permaculture teacher who believes that in order to ensure food security and restore
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Guilds:  A grouping of plants that are mutually beneficial to one another.  The classic guild was planted by Native Americans and called “the three sisters”: corn, beans, and squash.  The corn provided
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[quote=Mike Barkley]I'd bet that garden does well. Looks good. I'd plant a few more peas though. But what do I know? ... my corn didn't sprout this year Not one. So it's mostly a 2 sister year with several different kinds of squash, pumpkins, cukes, & beans. Good luck!

[/quote]

Thanks Mike! The corn is showing a bit of stress from the transplanting but we've had lots of showers followed by sun and good temps over the last few days so I expect it to take off pretty soon. I have some
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I'd bet that garden does well. Looks good. I'd plant a few more peas though. But what do I know? ... my corn didn't sprout this year Not one. So it's mostly a 2 sister year with several different kinds of squash, pumpkins, cukes, & beans. Good luck!

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Thanks again for all the tips and discussion everyone! Here's the result:

Corn in the back ("mushroom" variety grown for popcorn) with two sugar snap peas planted for each of the corn stalks in the front two rows. Hubbard squash are planted with perforated 500mL water bottles for direct watering to the roots. The black fabric is geotextile used for septic systems. It's ultra-tough (that stuff is in it's 3rd year of garden use) but permeable. I still have to make some cloches out of curtain
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I did not know about pumpkins growing up trees. That must have been a sight! Kind of makes me want to try it...

Thanks!
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I mentioned the trellis as a way to perhaps have a few more squash in the same footprint. As mentioned a few times already ... the right squash for your particular area & season seems most crucial.

Brassicas are sturdy plants. They won't mind some low level squash leaves.

Someone mentioned pumpkins. Seminole Indians grew them up trees. Seems like a squash could too.
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Sounds like you are set on hubbard squash. I get that. It's awesome, and if you can't buy it you have no choice but to grow it. My inclination would be to plant it on the shady side and guide it as it naturally grows toward the sun. But the only way to really know which is "best" for your particular case would be to plant some on each side and see how it works out. Why not?

Wishing you a bountiful harvest!
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in mind that corn is wind-pollinated, so if your plants are spaced too far apart, you might have pollination issues. The last time I grew in the Three Sisters style, I did staggered double rows
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is wind-pollinated, so if your plants are spaced too far apart, you might have pollination issues. The last time I grew in the Three Sisters style, I did staggered double rows, such that the placement
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or would this just encourage pests I wonder?

[quote=Kim Arnold]What if you plant a squash like zucchini or crooked-neck that doesn't really vine? I think the original three sisters used pumpkins[/quote]
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What if you plant a squash like zucchini or crooked-neck that doesn't really vine? I think the original three sisters used pumpkins and more "winter squash" kinds of plants, but we have choices
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Interesting. Novia Scotia & a 5x8 space. With presumably a short squash growing season. One strong squash or pumpkin plant would fill the entire area. Have you considered some sort of trellis for extra squash? Perhaps on the east, west, & north sides.
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Thanks Casie! I was thinking along the same lines... I’m going to give it a try and see how it works out for me.
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If you plant squash on the most shaded side of the corn it will have a tendency to reach for the sun. That could save some labor in encouraging it to naturally vine through the plants. Unfortunately that could be a tendency to try to climb your corn, so watch for that.
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Hi All!

This is my first year planting the Three Sisters and unfortunately I only have a 5' x 8' space to work with so I'm hoping for some feedback from more experienced gardeners.

The bed
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fixing plants, to help give the tomatoes everything that they need to grow.  

I guess this could turn into a form of three sisters planting with hugelkultur in a Japanese ring.  In this video, he talks
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]Mexican Truffle"! Seriously, who's going to eat "corn smut"? LOLl! No wonder it's not widely known outside of indigenous Aztec circles.
Three sisters you say? Maybe it was actually four[/i
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[quote=Gordon Haverland]
As I understand these plots, they were left unattended for the summer and into the fall.  The humans got back anticipating that all of the crops had matured, and dried out (corn and beans).  To get back to the winter home, and find now corn, beans or squash could have serious consequences.
[/quote]

I'm no expert in, well, anything, but this wasn't the case at all for the nations in the Northeast.  Of those, I know the most about the Lenape because I have an
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I live in an entirely different part of the world (central Portugal mountain) and the old (and new) folks of my village do a two sisters (sometimes three sisters) with corn and beans and what
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was examined, and they found fungi channeling nutrients between different species of trees.

---

In terms of deer predation of three sisters plots, I would agree that the deer would like have more
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You have to remember that they where doing thing in non degraded topsoil that was full of goocd microbes and nutrents. They could mine the soil in one spot for years before moving on.
Also deer where quite likley more afraid of humans then they are now.
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three sisters has, is the thorny/rough texture of the vines?  That seems to suggest that some people never did go to other places to find food, that they had to stay at the winter home in order to scare
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[quote=William Bronson] If one allows the beans to mature and dry on the vine isn't the bulk of the nitrogen going into the seed, with little left in the dead plants? [/quote]
I have read that if the plants are allowed to complete the cycle of going to seed, and you remove all of the seed, you have removed about 90% of all the nitrogen (and other nutrients). That 90% figure seems a bit high in my opinion. Regardless of what the actual value is, it seems apparent that without the fruit, less
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[quote=William Bronson] If one allows the beans to mature and dry on the vine isn't the bulk of the nitrogen going into the seed, with little left in the dead plants? [/quote]
Some is sent to the fruit, but there are nodules on the roots where a symbiotic relationship between soil microbes and the plant fix the nitrogen. Some of the nitrogen is absorbed from the air. Some is absorbed from the soil. These nodules release a lot of nitrogen when they decompose.
Just pruning a nitrogen fixing
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If one allows the beans to mature and dry on the vine isn't the bulk of the nitrogen going into the seed, with little left in the dead plants?
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I wonder if 'mucke' specifically means human manure? In which case were the early Europeans flinging the contents of their chamber pots over their fields? And were Native Americans, individually digging holes and burying their waste, the way wilderness hikers do (should). I'm just speculating. Both systems would fertilise...

I'm just wondering if the notion that Native Americans Don't Use Poo is just ethnocentric "I haven't seen them do it, therefore they don't do it".
Much like Europeans
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[quote]My understanding is that the beans are left to dry on the vine [/quote]
Correct. In fact, everything was pretty much left on the plant.
The 3 sisters were all winter food.
Corn and beans were dried for winter use. The squash was only cut once its growth was finished.

For proper saving of seed for any of the 3, it is necessary to let the fruits finish their maturation on the growing plant.
In its final spurts of life, an annual plant is transporting all of its energy to the
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My understanding is that the beans are left to dry on the vine and as the vine dies the roots release their nitrogen. Without the need for digging in or turning over. The dried vines are left to mulch/compost down with the corn stalks etc, on top of the soil. Cucurbits tend to suppress the weeds. Also there are the myriad benefits of any polyculture. The system seems complimentary, wonderfully simple and at the same time complex, building soil, encouraging and not disturbing soil biology,
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What we call thinning is a method of cutting down for nitrogen. I can't remember where I saw it, but they described the three sisters with detail--including specifics on planting what sounded like
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i always thought sunflowers were the fourth sister. usually i have lived in places where corn doesnt do well, and have used sunflower instead.

this year i am actually in a place where i can grow corn. we have some indian corn growing, we will see how it goes.

and yes agreed about your point about having to cut them down to get the most benefit of the the nitrogen fixing. i think the obvious way is to let some of them go fully, and cut down some of them and quickly mix them under or leave
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Somebody took the time to interview a NA gardener a very long time ago.

The thing is, they moved their gardens from time to time. So, if they did wear down the soil over a decade or so the soil would be rested when they moved their gardens. As for turning the legumes under, she did not. She cultivated with a digging stick: she had no shovel.

The Midwestern Natives were more gardeners than they were farmers. Yes they stored a good amount of dried corn, pumpkin, tobacco, sunflowers, beans,
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They did plant in the same place every year, just like our gardens. I imagine everything was mulched/composted in place.

There are lots of technical details overlooked, like WHEN to plant each-if you just plant them all at the same time the corn will be shaded out but the squash or pulled down by the beans.

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Here's a great article by Toby Hemenway: The three sisters or is it four?

[quote]Look at how many[/quote]
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about the legume aspect of The Three Sisters. Is it the same with beans as with peas? It would appear to be - http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_a/A129/:

[quote]The amount of nitrogen returned to the soil[/quote]
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parents came over, and my mom helped me get the bed ready to go. I wanted to try a three sisters-type bed...which made cutting Xs kind of hard to fathom. So, we took off the sacks. For each "mound," we dug
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in the household that eats corn), this is intended to produce seed.

I am doing a three sisters inspired thing.  I have a raised bed that is 15x22, and within that I will plant 8 columns and 10 rows of corn
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would look to the Three Sisters model to rearrange the positioning of your beans and curcurbits with your corn, for starters.

-CK
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modelled off of the three sisters. Indeed, corn, beans, and squash would probably play a large role in the garden, but likely in outer alleys, designed for minimal intervention throughout the season so
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and weekends, to harvest when it's done, you can do that. I would think about companion planting in guilds. The Three Sisters are an example you've probably come across, an aboriginal technique of growing
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="nofollow">three sisters technique - bean, corn, and squash.

They talk a bit more about soils in tropical climates, how they are much different, more like cement almost, because all
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="nofollow">three sisters technique - bean, corn, and squash.

They talk a bit more about soils in tropical climates, how they are much different, more like cement almost, because all
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will help your corn, and pumpkins are cucurbits so they will also work well in a three sisters guild.  Your potatoes will benefit from horseradish, peas, & garlic.

This got me thinking:  Should one
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failures have been celery (never again) and the three sisters. I think my corn was too widely spaced and too much ground was left exposed, I got very poor pollination rates on everything.  The next year
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after corn?)

I am plotting out a 4 year rotation, with winter cover crops and manure fertilization... I thought potatoes would be a good plant to follow the three sisters.
(three sisters
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species I want to base my plantings around.

If you are going to grow corn, I would suggest looking at the Three Sisters planting technique, whereby you grow corn primarily, which acts as a support
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the next planting could be the three sisters, or some variant thereupon, using squash as living mulch and a nitrogen-fixing bacteria host like beans to feed it, and some kind of structural crop like corn
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Have you tried growing the beans with the maze like the native americans do?  They use a three sisters system where squash plants cover the ground between the corn stalks and the bean vines are held
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by looking into "three sisters":
Companion Planting: Three Sisters | The Old Farmer's Almanac
[url=https://permies.com
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calendars, such as are used in Israel and Saudi Arabia.  (What about the Moon, Mars, ...?)

I think this is more complex.

Let's say I want to do some three sisters (I don't think the fourth sister
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the nutrients around the pond, making them available for the plant roots.

I think the method would work great with a three sisters type planting or any other type of multiple plantings.

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Testament prohibition about being anti three sisters guilds.
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Very good observations Thomas, part of the "three sisters" planting setup is that you bury fish first, build a mound over the fish (one for each plant your going to put in right away which
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at our property. The same was true for our three sisters garden, this year we did not bother to put much effort into the cucurbits (which never do much due to squash bugs) and we have had our best corn
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in the ground and fill them with a mix of compost, and mineral and clay soils, and plant into those. Use a modified mounded three sisters technique. They will be your islands of change.

Oh. I guess I have
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Mainly, I dislike it being suggested that because I don't see a thing the same way that someone else does, that I am missing something. To me, that smacks of condescension, from a position I consider lacking rational foundation or evidence.

I like the idea of sharing ideas of religion and spirituality. Even personal takes on established religion tell much about the sharer. I think that, because religion and spirituality have historically been such a large contributor to an individual's
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I view religion and spirituality as very similar to philosophy. We all have ideas about right and wrong and the intangibles that cannot be studied. Religion/spirituality/faith is often called a crutch. I often hear it called that in a condescending way, but what is a crutch other than an assistant to help us walk? We're all imperfect--none of us can know everything. Moral principles based upon faith/spirituality/religion/philosophy are a guide and an assistant to making choices. If we did not
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Hi All, this here is a thread to talk about The Three Sisters, Spiituruality, and Growing your Own food. It spun off of William Schlegel's topic here: https://permies.com/t/70889/Ideas-growing-food
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Yeah.

Don't mistake misunderstanding for rejection.

I have never found it useful for people to proselytize to me. It never made me want to convert.

I see purple permaculture in the same way. The audience members it is important to reach are worrying about their livelihoods. It is no wonder the purple permie movement hasn't made any inroads on converting farmers.

I am spiritual about how I go about my life as well, it's just not on display. I am comfortable enough with intellect and
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and spirits, but it could have been.  During the water part of our course, we sang songs about water.

The idea of Three Sisters can be interpreted holistically to include the spiritual element
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of describing and categorising what we observe.

The Three Sisters technique works because it takes advantages of the growth characteristics of three specific plants (and yes, I know there are more
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[quote=Jim Fry]I have thought about writing on these pages about Spirit and Ceremony for many months now. But it almost seems as if such writing is far outside of most thinking or interest. It just seems a direction with which "permaculture" is not concerned (interested).
If I am suffering from a misapprehension, let me know. Maybe we might begin to talk of the "other half" of life, living, and gardens.   [/quote]

You may, by all means, start a new thread about Spirit and Ceremony. We have
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Good points Kola Fry. This thread, while not really on the subject of the title, is staying to the OP's first post however.
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This is an interesting thread. The very first three words written were "Three Sisters Gardening". Every other word written after that is about square footage, preserving food, and other "mechanical
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nations planted many different crops together, they learned by observation which plants did the best with certain other plants and that is how the "native method" such as that of the three sisters
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to worry about green manures. I would go with some variation on the three sisters method, as mentioned earlier.

Are you in a position to use animals to accelerate soil development? You could go whole
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pictures. I have one pointed in that general direction but the three sisters and cassavas are too overgrown to see the hillside behind them.  I'll take new pics... After I weed them!
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?

Well paranoia or not, the clay dirt has been baked back into a solid brick.  Weeding is futile.  I can't get the roots out of the brick.  I started putting beans in the three sisters
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potatoes lines... Just figured it was more mulch.  When I went through recently pulling the beans from the three sisters, I found some of those forgotten throw-aways had rooted into the mulch
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.  I am so late getting my beans out of the three sisters plot, that some are starting to sprout in the pods!

My laptop got smashed, so now all I have is my fake Chinese knockoff "smart phone
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my beans out of the three sisters plot, that some are starting to sprout in the pods!

My laptop got smashed, so now all I have is my fake Chinese knockoff "smart phone", which probably does
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into is the more garden like space that is three sisters type plantings.
You will see the odd hickory at the edge with grape and muskadine vines running up to the sunlight, at the base area you will find
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that is three sisters type plantings.
You will see the odd hickory at the edge with grape and muskadine vines running up to the sunlight, at the base area you will find blackberries, raspberries
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corrective actions.  The Ahupua A system of Hawaii, the Chinampa system of the Aztecs, the three sisters system of Indigenous Americans, and the terraced rice paddies with ducks in South East Asia, come
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to move.  If there were worms in the clay under these planters.

People talk about nitrogen support for the corn and squash by the beans in Three Sisters plantings.  Some have wondered how this comes
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aren't getting the full benefit of the nitrogen fixation.

i believe in a no-till three sisters garden if you leave the stuff in the field the fertility should stay there and increase. it's a very
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Oh, parts of my farm/garden could use a lake's worth of fish.  That's not the question.  My concern is whether or not a large(ish) quantity of added fertility will be effectively absorbed/used by the fertility-hungry corn and squash, or if the less-fertility-hungry beans will (be able to) consume too much of it and put on a lot of lush vine growth at the expense of actual bean/pod production.  In other words, will the corn and squash be greedy enough to keep the beans a little hungry, or will
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who might want to eat them. Every year the Three grew well. But, the Standing Upright People began to notice that each year the Three Sisters grew just a bit less well. This concerned the Standing
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) To deal with nitrogen shortage I foliar with urin (add touch of wood ash) There is a great deal more then three sisters in a traditional Mayan corn field.  Of course, i have a great deal to learn
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I have a 1/4-acre patch that has been seeded in the traditional Three Sisters of corn, beans, and squash.  I'm trying to transition over to a no-till system, and the first step in that direction
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can't wait to try your method.  I am SO excited.

About the three sisters plantings, I'm wondering about depth of planting as well as timing.  Were the squash and beans planted at the same depth
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of my life fell out. My eventual goal was a modern day version of the local Indians "Three Sisters" crop. They grew corn, beans and squash all together. Corn first in the spring, then as soon
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I'd just like to note, I grew three sisters this past year. I do not live in a desert environment, and suffered from not enough sunshine and pooled water in the beds around the edges with all
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the various three sisters in relation to the other. I've tried a waffle garden two years in a row. Once with corn, squash, and beans and one with sunflowers, squash, onions, and radishes. I used mostly seeds
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pits and trenches and such (I grew up in the desert; didn't even know that there WAS such a thing as planting on a hill, LOL), but not deep planting.

Re: when to plant the various three sisters
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of advice. I would mono crop each seed in its own trench on a small scale my first year. Learn what these crops need first as individuals before you try the three sisters. The issue
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to grow the three sisters here in the summer, but it would be even better if I didn't have to irrigate. We have no rain from early June to early October, so it seems like a desert during those months.
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Hello Juanita,

The Three Sisters was another area I was planning on experimenting in. I intended to work these into the the trench planting method, in order to study the ability of the trench
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Americans used three sisters gardening as a staple and that helped them transition from nomadic to more settled villages, but how much nutrition and calories did they get from three sisters gardening
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Fence fail
A few weeks ago, we got a bunch of beans in (among corn 5 inches high, three sisters style), along with summer squash and cucumbers.
This evening, all were gone.  The beans were
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could fish and clam, but with the NPK run off in our Sound, it would be like eating conventional produce that you didn't even wash!

Farming of corn, beans and squash the original three sisters
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Twin oaks community http://www.twinoaks.org/
three sisters farm http://www.bioshelter.com/3SistersFarm.html

for sure there are many others you could check the following forum

[url=https
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Hi Jana, Welcome to Permies! I love the picture. How sweet!

My gardening experience started early, too, age 5 or 6. Only, in my case, myself and two of my three sisters would have garden
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have taken up all my space, and starting that much corn and such indoors would be a huge pain.  I like the idea of the three sisters garden because it's minimal maintenance and mimics nature
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as the nitrogen fixer.  I could just broadcast early and hope for the best.  

Then in the center of the field, I'll have three sisters crops, a mix of sweet and dent corns, many varieties of pole beans
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Hey folks. Planning out my garden this year, I decided to try out the "Three Sisters" method of growing corn, squash and beans together in a polyculture; a Native American technique I've always been
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into an agricultural capacity (except for vegetables, see The Three Sisters).  Because of this, there was simply no need for them to domesticate animals, and it was more rewarding in the short term
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societies operated in a hunter-gatherer capacity and never truly progressed into an agricultural capacity (except for vegetables, see The Three Sisters).  Because of this, there was simply no need for them
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hau Maureen, what a marvelous idea, using cartoons to get points across, simply brilliant!

The three sisters were most likely taught by missionaries some time ago.
The practices you mention
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of any other plant in that field.

Growing for consumption,few of us would choose an all corn field over a three sisters field, if no other reason than to avoid culinary boredom.
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up sunflowers and even the apple trees in our yard. The squash usually ends up running through everything in the garden. So I imagine the three sisters can be pretty diverse and just depends on what
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