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Seedling peach tree success/proof that it's worth it to grow from seed.

 
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In climates with wet winters peach trees are susceptible to peach leaf curl the following spring. Some varieties have been developed that have strong resistance to that. I wonder if planting the pit from these would generally carry on this gene? Has anyone tried it?
 
James Landreth
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Galadriel, do you have problems with leaf curl there too? Have you thought about grafting over the seedlings if the fruit still isn't satisfactory?
 
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James Landreth wrote:In climates with wet winters peach trees are susceptible to peach leaf curl the following spring. Some varieties have been developed that have strong resistance to that. I wonder if planting the pit from these would generally carry on this gene? Has anyone tried it?



Some of the offspring should carry that trait from the parent but some may not. I'm interested in breeding tasty disease resistant fruit by selecting vigorous growers in our hot humid climate where lots of fruit trees struggle.
 
Steve Thorn
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Dan Allen wrote:And here is a seedling apple with several named varieties grafted on. It's about 12' tall and three years old. I used a tongue and cleft and just wrapped with cellophane.



That is one tall apple! Any fruit yet?
 
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No fruit yet. I think it should next year because it appears to have blossom buds on it. But not the grafts, I just did them this spring. They did take, at least 3 of them put out new growth. Hopefully I'll be able to try the fruit next fall. If it's no good I'll cut down that tall whip and focus it's growth on the grafts, it has Johnathan, golden delicious and honeycrisp.
 
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James Landreth wrote:Galadriel, do you have problems with leaf curl there too? Have you thought about grafting over the seedlings if the fruit still isn't satisfactory?



Yes, they both got some degree of leaf curl, though both shook it off fairly well, with a lot of growth over summer.  I have an almond tree too (a bought, grafted specimen) which also gets mild leaf curl.  Most UK gardening sources suggest growing in containers partly to combat leaf curl--apparently the fungus is introduced through rainfall during flowering.  But containers are also recommended because we generally have such cool summers and a warm patio (or a greenhouse) is more likely to coax fruit than a more exposed position in the garden.

Grafting is a great idea, and if one tree is superior, I'll definitely try it.

 
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I planted seeds from my fridge today between rain storms. Apple, plum, nectarine, and peach. I was excited to see the nectarines were starting to sprout.  Hopefully they will do their thing and come up in the spring. If not I will try again next year.

They cleared a bunch of foliage in my apartment complex back in the city. I am bummed because there is that much less privacy.  But happy because I might get enough light now to grow things and that is a nice thought. Trying to look at the bright side (literally).
 
Dan Allen
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Sonja Draven wrote:I planted seeds from my fridge today between rain storms. Apple, plum, nectarine, and peach. I was excited to see the nectarines were starting to sprout.  Hopefully they will do their thing and come up in the spring. If not I will try again next year.

They cleared a bunch of foliage in my apartment complex back in the city. I am bummed because there is that much less privacy.  But happy because I might get enough light now to grow things and that is a nice thought. Trying to look at the bright side (literally).



That's awesome, and admirable. Plant trees everywhere. I plant fruit trees at all my favorite fishing spots with my son. Eat a peach plant a pit.
 
Dan Allen
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Update on the peaches:
Well, it seems they had a rough time this winter. The lowest low was -26 in January for a full night. That's a solid zone 4 winter, the last time we had temps like that was 2014. The trees survived fine, some minor tip die back and very few blossoms, around fifty compared to the usual uncountable flowers. Second generation seedlings all survived with even less tip burn. Even through sassafrasses and catalpas got burned this winter. First pic is the unusual blossoms of the large yellow peach, second pic is a seedling leafing out, third pic is another seedling peach with normal blossoms. Our spring is a full month late this year.
Unusual-blossoms-of-the-large-yellow-peach.jpg
Unusual blossoms of the large yellow peach
Unusual blossoms of the large yellow peach
Seedling-leafing-out.jpg
Seedling leafing out
Seedling leafing out
Seedling-peach-with-normal-blossoms.jpg
Seedling peach with normal blossoms
Seedling peach with normal blossoms
 
Dan Allen
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And here are several grafts that I put on a seedling apple last spring. No fruit on this one yet. But all grafts were successful, so if the seedling produces good fruit it will have four varieties.
Successful-grafts-on-seed-grown-apple-tree.jpg
Successful grafts on seed grown apple tree
Successful grafts on seed grown apple tree
Seed-grown-apple-tree-with-successful-graft.jpg
Seed grown apple tree with successful graft
Seed grown apple tree with successful graft
Close-up-of-graft-on-seed-grown-apple-tree.jpg
Close up of graft on seed grown apple tree
Close up of graft on seed grown apple tree
 
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