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How do I dispose Kitchen waste and garden waste in an Eco friendly manner?  RSS feed

 
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How do I dispose Kitchen waste and garden waste in an Eco friendly manner?
 
Posts: 101
Location: NE PA (Zone 6a)
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building homestead trees ungarbage woodworking
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Create a compost pile. You can use the compost you create to keep your lawn and garden healthy.

You can compost: eggshells, nutshells, teabags, coffee grounds, fruits, vegetables and other plant matter.

You cannot compost: dairy products, grease, oils, bones, and meat scraps.

Select a dry shady spot in your yard to keep your compost.
Mix food scraps with plant materials such as dead leaves or branches.
Add water to your compost pile as needed to encourage decomposition.
Turn over your compost pile regularly to mix the top additions into the base of the pile.

I have attached a pdf file (The Complete Guide to Home Composting) by Joe Lampl from Growing a Greener World. https://joegardener.com/

Filename: Complete-Guide-to-Home-Composting.pdf
Description: Complete guide to home composting by Joe Lampl
File size: 23 megabytes
 
pollinator
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Location: Virginia
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We have used a couple methods.  It partly is influenced by the amount of waste you are trying to take care of.

For kitchen waste, we used to have a worm composting set up. That worked pretty well for small volume, but it didn't handle enough for what we wanted to do.  Then we went to chickens, they are amazing waste disposal units!šŸ˜€ They also got into the worm bin when the lid wasnt on right and ate the worms...

Outside, most garden waste is piled into the chicken pen.  They like to scratch it around and find tasty critters. A couple times a year, I get back wondrful compost for the garden.  

Between careful eating habits, the dog, chickens and wood stove, we have very little waste in our household.

We have recently been picking up kitchen trash from a housebound couple to take to the local trash station for them. They generate almost a large bag each day.  I realize how far we have come in changing our lives with waste reduction and it is encouraging.
 
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Composting anaerobically (without oxygen) creates methane. Sun-exposed compost creates nitrogen gasses.

By putting a lid on your compost heap (plastic or soil) and by composting properly (30:1 C:N, moist but not soaked) you will reduce the emissions of your pile and retain nutrients that would otherwise enter the atmosphere.

Composting creates recalcitrant soil carbon in forms such as humic acid, which is a very environmentally friendly way of disposing of organic wastes.

Turning a compost frequently will encourage the nitrogen to escape, but you can achieve aeration through pile-structure or embedded pipes. Some people prefer to build cold piles that are primarily digested by fungi and do not get hot enough to volatilize the organic compounds.
 
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I second the chicken recommendations.

In the beginning I kept out moldy foods, onions, raw potato peels,.. but now I just add it all into the chicken pen, my theory is that as long as the chickens have enough food, they will stay away from the food that is dangerous for them. None of my chickens have died so far (knock on wood)

But, if you want to do some extra work or get some heat from your scraps, you can biochar it, here is an example of how to do it:



M
 
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