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Incapable of hibernation, or extremely hardy? (Peach seedling)  RSS feed

 
Posts: 100
Location: Utah
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I've been watching this tree all winter. It's a third year peach tree seedling from my own seeds. The temperatures have ranged down into the single digits, it's been buried in snow...and yet the leaves just keep hanging on. They're firmly attached, too. It looks like the tree has barely shuddered under the snow load. All the limbs are still flexible, the leaves still firmly attached, just like it was summer.

So I'm wondering. If this bears good fruit (which it should, as all the possible parents did) would it be a good candidate for a more northern climate, where the winters are harsher? Or is it incapable of hibernation and it would die because of the conditions? In which case it should go more southern...

I was going to give this one away, but now I want to see what it's capable of. Like the seedling a few years ago that came up in straight sand where it hadn't been watered for months...
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pollinator
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This might not be genetic. I've had this happen with lots of nitrogen. Like when I had chickens a deciduous tree right next to where they had been for awhile. Or a tree right next to a compost pile.
 
Lauren Ritz
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It's in the main garden, which is still mostly sand after 40 years of intensive composting. No special treatment, not fertilized or anything. Other trees were right around it that were transplanted last spring and they all behaved normally during the previous winter. I guess the test would be if it was planted in its permanent spot and still does this...
 
gardener
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When it bears fruit I'd love a few pits!  We'll give it a good test in my sandy and rather chilly climate
 
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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Leave it where it is. Send some self-pollinated seedlings or direct rotted cutting to folks in 0 chill hours zone 10 FL or CA or AZ and send some to some zone 3 or 4 Maine/etc and see what happens. Not being able to hibernate doesn't have to be a bad thing.  
 
Lauren Ritz
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S Bengi wrote:Leave it where it is. Send some self-pollinated seedlings or direct rotted cutting to folks in 0 chill hours zone 10 FL or CA or AZ and send some to some zone 3 or 4 Maine/etc and see what happens. Not being able to hibernate doesn't have to be a bad thing.  



It's impossible to tell at this point whether this is cold tolerance or the opposite, but I want to know! At the moment I'm trying to decide whether to leave it where it is or move it into the orchard (food forest) area. I was planning to give it away this spring and I don't necessarily want a peach tree smack in the middle of the main garden. It'll be a year or two before it fruits, but I may be able to get some cuttings going.
 
Lauren Ritz
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Mike Jay wrote:When it bears fruit I'd love a few pits!  We'll give it a good test in my sandy and rather chilly climate

I'll try to remember.
 
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I see that happen with seedling peaches here in zone 5 Michigan as well. Usually with younger seedlings or new growth on older seedling peaches after coppicing. My theory is that they are naturally a more warm temperate yet adaptable species. So as the branches get older they adapt to the seasons. I see this to a lesser extent on apricots as well.
 
If you open the box, you will find Heisenberg strangling Shrodenger's cat. And waving this tiny ad:
PEP1 Certification workshop/gathering/event May/June 2019
https://permies.com/wiki/98047/PEP-Certification-workshop-gathering-event
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