• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

live oak leaf/twig mulch/soil

 
                                  
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi a friend of mine says he had a brick raised bed beside his house he just uses to put the yard scraps in from raking leaves/twigs from a huge live oak in his yard, he says its full of earth worms and looks like dark soil and has been putting the leaves and such in there for over 5 years would this be good to use as soil? or should i mix it with other stuff for a keyhole garden I am building.

Thanks for any advice
Lonnie
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 8852
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
112
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I add live oak leaves to my gardens and they seem to do fine. 
 
Jonathan Byron
Posts: 225
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yup, works fine for most things. Takes a bit longer to break down than leaves from maple and other trees, but it will break down into a rich humus.
 
Jan Sebastian Dunkelheit
Posts: 201
Location: Germany/Cologne - Finland/Savonlinna
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a pile of twigs and leaves, too. The soil is great to plant trees or bushes in. Amazingly dark because of the high carbon content. Perfect soil for funghi. Leaf compost lacks nitrogen, potassium and other stuff so it is quite poor soil even though it looks great and crumbly. Certainly too poor for most veggies. I would fertilize it with liquid gold, molasses, rockdust and of course kitchen scraps whilst building your keyhole garden. Rockdust is lightly alcaline and neutralizes the acidic tannines from oak leaves.
 
John Polk
steward
Pie
Posts: 7762
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
240
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As stated, oak leaves are acidic.  They will acidify your soil more so than pine needles will.
They would be especially great for a blueberry patch.
 
                                  
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for the info folks I am problemly gonna mix the oak leaf soil with a bunch of manuar and some comepost ive made as i stack the layers in my keyhole garden, not to mention kitchen scrapes (I work in a resteraunt not hard to get all i want) we also have like 4 gallons of old molasses on a shelf I could get when you say molasess can it be just any? or does it have to be unprocessed and how should you add that just drizzle between layers?
lol sorry more questions I know

Thanks
Lonnie
 
Jan Sebastian Dunkelheit
Posts: 201
Location: Germany/Cologne - Finland/Savonlinna
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You won't find unprocessed molasses. It's industrially produced. The lowest state of processed molasses is sugar-beet boiled in water. If it is edible molasses you can use it. If it is not allowed to be used as human food ingredient, I would look up the offical list of ingredients on the back of the package.
 
Jonathan Byron
Posts: 225
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If it is not labeled for human use, you won't necessarily know why from the ingredient list. It may be labeled 'not for human consumption' because the producer is not confident that the bacteria count is low enough or safe.

And around here, molasses is a term for dark sorghum syrup. Is that 'industrial' or is it 'kitchen' production? Depends on who makes it. It is pressed and boiled, but the scale of the process varies.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic