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Bean Breeding? Scarlet runner X common bean

 
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Location: Zone 5b
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Does anyone here have any experience breeding a scarlet runner bean with a common green bean?  I've read that it should be possible, if a bit difficult.  Also, how do you think the traits would differ depending on who the mother is and who the father is?  This would be my first experiment breeding plants, and I'm planning on crossing the aforementioned scarlet runner bean with the dragon's tongue bush bean.  I want the vines to be shorter than the scarlet runners, and the beans to be more similar to the dragon's tongue, while also aiming for some very pretty flowers.  Basically, ornamental plant meets delicious legume.  I've already read a book on general plant breeding, but I don't know anything about these bean specific questions.  Any insight is very appreciated!
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I'm growing interspecies hybrids between common beans and runner beans. I believe that the cross only works if the common bean is the mother, and the runner bean is the pollen donor. You can tell if attempts at crossing were successful in a number of ways... The cotyledons of runner beans stay below ground. The cotyledons of common beans are high in the air. The cotyledons of F1 hybrids are approximately at ground level. (photos below). Another way to tell, is that if scarlet flowers show up in the common bean patch, it may be because of cross pollination. Naturally occurring crosses are more likely if the two species are planted closely together. Also, if only bush beans are grown next to runner beans, and vines show up in the bush beans, they may be from a naturally occurring cross. In the F1, runner bean traits were dominant for seed coat color, flower color, and pod type.

beans-common-X-runner_640a.jpg
[Thumbnail for beans-common-X-runner_640a.jpg]
F1 hybrids between common beans and runner beans. Cotyledons at about ground level.
bean-interspecies-crossing-attempts_640a.jpg
[Thumbnail for bean-interspecies-crossing-attempts_640a.jpg]
Common beans, that self pollinated even though manual cross pollination was attempted.
 
Heiden Lentz
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Location: Zone 5b
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:I'm growing interspecies hybrids between common beans and runner beans. I believe that the cross only works if the common bean is the mother, and the runner bean is the pollen donor. You can tell if attempts at crossing were successful in a number of ways... The cotyledons of runner beans stay below ground. The cotyledons of common beans are high in the air. The cotyledons of F1 hybrids are approximately at ground level. (photos below). Another way to tell, is that if scarlet flowers show up in the common bean patch, it may be because of cross pollination. Naturally occurring crosses are more likely if the two species are planted closely together. Also, if only bush beans are grown next to runner beans, and vines show up in the bush beans, they may be from a naturally occurring cross. In the F1, runner bean traits were dominant for seed coat color, flower color, and pod type.


Thank you so much for this information!
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Here's a photo of the F1 (common X runner) flowers. Seemed like the color wasn't quite as intense as pure scarlet runner flowers.
common-x-runner-F1.jpg
[Thumbnail for common-x-runner-F1.jpg]
Interspecies hybrid: Common bean X scarlet runner bean
 
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