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Coyote attack, injured chicken  RSS feed

 
Posts: 124
Location: Northern Puget Sound, Zone 8A
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We had at least 6 chickens killed the other night.  5 outright, 1 I put down due to a neck injury.  Might have been able save that one but I don't have budget for a vet bill for something like that.

Anyway, another chicken is hurt.  We know she's got a lower leg/upper foot injury.  Beyond that we can't see anything obvious.  But she's not moving on her own, and isn't drinking or eating.  What can we do, short of an expensive vet, to help her?  She's one of the original 3, so I'm more interested in effort to save her, for the kids sake.

Would a syringe to get some wet food into her be a good idea?
 
pollinator
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Blu-Cote spray is what we used to use as antiseptic/healing on the injury.


When I first read the headline, I thought it said "Coyote attack, injured children" - so glad it wasn't actually that.
 
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What makes you think you have coyote problem? Sounds like some other animal is the cause of your grief.
 
Andrew Mayflower
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Jim Fry wrote:What makes you think you have coyote problem? Sounds like some other animal is the cause of your grief.



Tracks were pretty clear in the snow.

4 of the 5 killed were taken.  Just one was left behind dead.
 
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Vets mostly don't know anything about chickens. As there economical value is below even a short visit, they are usually simply slaughtered and eaten. One can have great success getting sick chickens healthy, mixing magnesium into something they can't resist such as cat food. But it has to be done quickly, if some chicken doesn't start eating again, it doesn't take long and it will die. ;-(
 
pollinator
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I have cured many injured chickens - even ones with quite large wounds.

1. Step one is to clean any obvious wound gently. I then use Calendula gel as a gentle, natural antibiotic. Sometimes I give them Arnica in water on a spoon also. If the bird is in shock, it should help. Some people use something called "Rescue Remedy" for the same purpose, but I've not had experience with it.

2. I start them in a 15" x 21" tote with a hardware cloth +wood lid over the top and hanging feed and waterers. Actually, I usually start with just water with a little Magnesium added as it has a calming/relaxing effect. Put the tote in a warm spot. They need quiet and you don't want other birds picking on them.

3. You said the leg was injured - have you palpated gently to make sure it's not broken? If it's just soft-tissue damage, just keeping her in the tote and warm should help a lot.

4. Sometimes a frightened chicken will die a few days later just out of the shock of the attack. I'd do what I can for her - talking calmly and reassuringly to her, and then just accept what nature's choice is. Since it sounds like she's a bit of a "special" chicken, I'd think about a spot for a nice new tree or berry shrub that would benefit from your friend if it comes to that.
 
Andrew Mayflower
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Jay Angler wrote:I have cured many injured chickens - even ones with quite large wounds.

1. Step one is to clean any obvious wound gently. I then use Calendula gel as a gentle, natural antibiotic. Sometimes I give them Arnica in water on a spoon also. If the bird is in shock, it should help. Some people use something called "Rescue Remedy" for the same purpose, but I've not had experience with it.

2. I start them in a 15" x 21" tote with a hardware cloth +wood lid over the top and hanging feed and waterers. Actually, I usually start with just water with a little Magnesium added as it has a calming/relaxing effect. Put the tote in a warm spot. They need quiet and you don't want other birds picking on them.

3. You said the leg was injured - have you palpated gently to make sure it's not broken? If it's just soft-tissue damage, just keeping her in the tote and warm should help a lot.

4. Sometimes a frightened chicken will die a few days later just out of the shock of the attack. I'd do what I can for her - talking calmly and reassuringly to her, and then just accept what nature's choice is. Since it sounds like she's a bit of a "special" chicken, I'd think about a spot for a nice new tree or berry shrub that would benefit from your friend if it comes to that.



Yeah, this is one I don't think even I'd be up for eating.  Maybe, but probably not.  Her name is Guardian since she was the one that took care of the others when there was just a few at the start.  

Just talked to my wife.  Guardian is not going well.  Won't even hold her head up off the floor at this point.  My wife was able to give her some water with basically a turkey baster.  But that didn't seem to do much.

I'll see what I can find for supportive remedies, but I won't leave her to suffer.  Suggestions, beyond magnesium as already mentioned, are appreciated.  Of course, if she has some kind of internal injury not much is going to help her.
 
Andrew Mayflower
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So, of course the rest of life gets in the way.  My best friend just had a vasectomy, and the long standing plan was to head to his place for commiseration tonight.  My wife is going to get an electrolyte/vitamin supplement and a syringe so she can better give the fluids to Guardian.  

Tomorrow, if she's still alive, we'll reassess.  
 
Andrew Mayflower
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Guardian died this morning.  I'll find a place to bury her after the snow melts.
 
Jay Angler
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I'm sorry you lost her. I hope you find a location to honour her and that she helps new growth come.
 
She'll be back. I'm just gonna wait here. With this tiny ad:
Binge on 17 Seasons of Permaculture Design Monkeys!
http://permaculture-design-course.com
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