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Can anyone think of a use for 10lbs of spoiled commercial frosting before it goes to the landfill?

 
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I get free buckets from the bakery department at my local Safeway, and the last round included three full buckets of spoiled strawberry frosting. I'm still ramping up my garden and don't have the compost volume to be comfortable adding that much oil/sugar/preservative/dye, but I wanted to check before I tossed it in the landfill bin in case someone had run into the same dilemma and found a solution.
 
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How does that stuff spoil? Besides the thought that I didn't know it COULD go bad, that might help figure out if it's useable.
Moldy? Ranicd?
 
Wiley Fry
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It separated into a very light fluffy layer and a thick syrupy layer. It still smells disturbingly appetizing and doesn't show any signs of mold (which, given that it's been sitting in my garage for two weeks, is one of the things that makes me not want it in my compost) but looks like the aftermath of a grisly murder in the Strawberry Shortcake universe.
 
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Get an airlock ,add yeast and water,and make booze.
Get some unpasteurized apple cider vinegar and add it to the booze to make vinegar.
Profit?

I would probably just wash it down the drain, or sit it out for the wildlife.
Some things ain't worth salvaging.
Bread?  
My chickens won't even touch it.
 
Pearl Sutton
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So it just sat unstirred too long? Take to a paint store and run it through their shaker!! :D

I'm with William on this one, I wouldn't feed it to my animals. Don't think they'd want it...
If it's not molding, that's spooky. Make booze or toss it.
OR!!
It's winter... Do snow art with it!! Stir it up, shape it into things, let it freeze outside, you may have a new art form!! If it's already grisly murder colored, that could be an asset... :D
Ever seen the bit where you make designs on the snow with maple syrup and let it freeze as candy? This could be the weird brother of that!
One of those fake yard deer, some frosting, in the snow, disturb the neighbors...
Ok, you can swat me now :D
 
pollinator
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If fermented and distilled a few times, it'd fuel an alcohol stove. I wonder, though, if it might burn decently if pelletized with biomass like sawdust or waste paper. I don't know that you'd get enough energy out of it to be worth while, but if it'll burn, you'll be rid of it. I suspect the dry fuel route would produce less waste. The alcohol route would surely have a by-product left after distillation.
 
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I hear sugar can be good for soil microbes. Maybe dilute it and toss it somewhere you want the soil improved
 
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Can’t be any worse than corn sugar to feed bees with.
 
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I bet you could make a good weed killer with it....seems like it would kill lots of things!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Dennis Mitchell wrote:Can’t be any worse than corn sugar to feed bees with.


I'd classify that as bee abuse, personally :P Corn syrup isn't healthy for bees, can't imagine frosting is....
Could just be me.
 
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i think this would likely compost fine in a big enough pile or diluted out over multiple piles. I'd imagine it's mostly sugar and food coloring and some vegetable oil. It's certainly not human food and in too high a concentration would be a recipe for weird microbial communities. I think that if spread in very thin layers in a large compost pile it would disappear nicely. could also try burying some just to see what happens.
 
Dennis Mitchell
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

Dennis Mitchell wrote:Can’t be any worse than corn sugar to feed bees with.


I'd classify that as bee abuse, personally :P Corn syrup isn't healthy for bees, can't imagine frosting is....
Could just be me.


Ya, they feed crap to bees. Now what is truly abuse is feeding that crap to our kids, but we do it all the time.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Dennis Mitchell wrote:

Pearl Sutton wrote:

Dennis Mitchell wrote:Can’t be any worse than corn sugar to feed bees with.


I'd classify that as bee abuse, personally :P Corn syrup isn't healthy for bees, can't imagine frosting is....
Could just be me.


Ya, they feed crap to bees. Now what is truly abuse is feeding that crap to our kids, but we do it all the time.


True :) I don't think humans need to eat it either, again, could just be me. :)
I wouldn't eat it.

I still love the art idea :)
 
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If you live somewhere that salt is used to melt ice on walkways, you could dilute some icing so it will spray out of a sprayer and use it instead of salt. Candy factory waste can be used to keep roadways free of ice instead of salt, and after the snow and ice dilutes it, you have food for soil life instead of salty death.

-CK
 
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I would make a compost tea out of it. Wait until it is a little warmer and brew for 48 hours. Thats a dry climate and you can help get some active soils. Plus your neighbors will wonder whats up with your yard.
 
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(Former commercial baker, here.) That stuff is pretty much greasy toxic waste. That bucket frosting is made of essentially generic Crisco and high fructose corn syrup, with a huge, unhealthy dose of artificial flavors and colors. That would be like dumping petroleum on your compost. If you must do something with it, pour it onto your gravel driveway. It will either kill your compost, or cause it to burst into flames. DO NOT POUR IT DOWN YOUR DRAIN!! You know, unless you *enjoy* clogging up your plumbing. You'd actually be better off filtering it, & using it to fuel oil lamps. There's a reason they 'gave' that to you. Now, they don't have to dispose of it - they've passed that little conundrum off to you. It's a great source, for buckets, though! :)
 
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I'll try anything like that in a compost pile, the carbon cycle there will bind up even small amounts of pesticides , herbicides, etc,(according to Geoff Lawton),

just start slow.

because of the heavy fat/sugar content add some extra nitrogen, since those elements are mostly carbon  (the carbon bonding cycle builds from  simple sugar, to more complex carbohydrates, to fat, or  to cellulose,  each one a slightly longer chain of carbons and hydrogens, storing more energy.

Maybe you could soak your firewood in it, dry it out, burn whatever is left in next years fires


 
Pearl Sutton
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Flammable! Now THAT is an interesting thought!
 
Carla Burke
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Flammable! Now THAT is an interesting thought!



Lol - please note that I didn't say it would smell good. It will likely smell like burnt/ burning sugar, and will smoke badly. It would just be a better use than composting it, or dumping it down the drain.
 
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Make your own rocket motors.  40 percent icing, 60 percent salt peter and pour in molds.  If you want to make it go faster add 1 percent sulfur, but be carful it will burn really fast.  Works good for removing stumps.
 
William Bronson
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Dove a dumpster after V day.
"Scored" a cake and bunch of cookies.
Tried the cookies.... blarg!
Not spoiled,  just nasty icing and parbaked dough.
The kids like them
The cake,  turned out to be an "ice cream" cake.  
It never really melted....
Left it out for the chooks,  they wouldn't eat it.
Tossed the cake in the trash,  my wife shares the cookies with panhaldlers people.

Not worth the trouble, not at all.
 
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Got any invasive plant species to deal with?

Get a little feeder pig. Put him on a tether. Pour frosting on invasive species. Watch pig work. Repeat.

What if you dont want pigs? "Then you must do the pigs work." Sepp
 
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