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Considering buying land next to a wind turbine farm

 
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I am looking at 2 pieces of land that are both 1 mile from a HUGE wind farm. I don't mind the appearance of a wind farm, as it is a symbol of improving the sustainability of human practices. It also leads me to believe that there are more people around this area who are interested in alternative technologies and methods (permaculture). What do you think?
 
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Jack, it is unlikely that the people living there agitated for or funded the wind farm, so I wouldn't imagine it shows there is  keen interest in alternative energy locally. These farms are built where they can get line access and wind. Hope this helps.

At least you are unlikely to have problems with avian predation. (tongue in cheek).
 
Levi Estone
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Tj Jefferson wrote:Jack, it is unlikely that the people living there agitated for or funded the wind farm, so I wouldn't imagine it shows there is  keen interest in alternative energy locally. These farms are built where they can get line access and wind. Hope this helps.  


I have been having the hardest time finding a decent place to live. It all seems to be doom and gloom. "Don't move here, your land might get bulldozed because you don't own the mineral rights" "Don't move there, there's too many people." "Don't move there, it's too hot/cold/dry/wet". These are all thoughts that pass through my head.
 
pollinator
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I think a place being too hot/cold/wet/dry, within reason, is far better than a place being unsuitable because you can't get the mineral rights.

Take a look at the land. Look at what municipal planning has to say about the area for the foreseeable future. If you don't see any conflicts and you're happy with it, buy the land.

Alternately, you could decide what flavour of discomfort suits you best, and expand your search there. Are you a fan of winter, or do you hate snow and ice with a bloody fervent passion?

People live on the equator, within the arctic circle, and all places in between. Don't get discouraged out of the gate. Find out what you're willing to deal with, and what's a dealbreaker for you, and go from there.

Let us know how you decide, and good luck.

-CK
 
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I have no personal experience or knowledge about, I don't know if it is true or not, …
But, I have read that wind turbines contain large amounts of oil in their "motors".
And that if they develop a leak, all that oil can hit the ground. I have also read that
they can be very noisy, especially when turning at full speed. And there are reports
that the turning blades can be very tough on birds.
---So, they just may not be all that great for the environment. I don't know.

So I'm guessing that a wind farm might not be all that great as a neighbor. Maybe.
 
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Speaking from experience they are comparable in noise to having a 2 lane divided highway about a half mile away. Noticable if you listen for it but it will quickly fade into background noise. They are easier to ignore than a highway because they are consistent too. Best bet if you are really interested in the property is to go for a drive and talk to the neighbors, ask things like how the well water is or how good of a plowing job the town/county does. If the windmills are an issue for them they'll let you know before you can even ask.
Best of luck with your land search
 
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Don't buy downwind, they are VERY VERY noisy, anything over 2 miles or so will be fine. If you think you won't mind go visit the property in high winds, decide for yourself. I live near some 300Meter high ones (over 3 X as high as those in your picture. they are about 4 miles away I do not hear them. The only thing that might be an issue is why they are there in the first place. if it is a windy exposed area it may not be the best place to buy. And a quick google shows they are on an old mine, that might be a much bigger issue than the turbines.

 
pollinator
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I've lived next to a large wind farm for close to 14 years. It comprises 55 1.65 MW turbines and the closest ones are about 1 km as the raptor flies. The towers are 70 m tall and the rotor length is 35 m.

Here are some bits of info I can share with you:

1. Big turbines spin slowly. The greater the radius, the slower the rotation speed. These ones on the hills above our place do 54 rpm. This means that very few birds get hit, since they can see the rotor coming.

2. They're not all that loud. New rotors are quieter than old ones. This is thanks to better design, including decurved vanes and surface patterns like owl plumage. Our local wind farm predates these developments but in order to hear them from our property, you need the right conditions. If you stand in just the right spot (actually, there are dozens of them spaced sort of evenly) and it's quiet out, you can detect the infrasonic thump which is effectively an interference pattern from multiple turbines. If you are unlucky enough to have a house that intersects one of the node points where the standing wave occurs *and* your house resonates at that low frequency, this can be a real drag. At our house it's not a problem. The only other time we hear them is when there is a stiff wind (50 km/h +) blowing from the direction of the wind farm and a low cloud deck. Then we can make out some of the whooshing from the closest ones, but there's so much other wind-related sound, and usually rain, that you have to know what to listen for. The big diesel trucks descending the steep hill on the state highway make far more noise with their exhaust brakes.

3. The gearboxes and bearings are lubricated by oil. Some of these can leak (we've seen it happen), but again, newer designs are improving the performance or doing away with the gearbox altogether.

4. They are mesmerising to watch, especially right before sunset when they start to turn pink and gold. Much nicer to look at than smokestacks.
 
Levi Estone
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I decided against the two lots next to this area, since there is an HOA, which I am unwilling to put up with.
 
Chris Kott
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Yeah, HOAs can be seriously toxic. I would put them right up there with glyphosate.

-CK
 
pollinator
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Ok, somebody has to ask.
What is an HOA?
 
Tj Jefferson
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John C Daley wrote:Ok, somebody has to ask.
What is an HOA?



American torture invention. Home owners association
 
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Tj Jefferson wrote:

John C Daley wrote:Ok, somebody has to ask.
What is an HOA?



American torture invention. Home owners association



I know all about that from the other side.
For a couple of years I served as a Homeowner's Association President for 425 townhouse units. It was like babysitting entitled brats. While the majority of the residents were just fine, we had more than our share of irresponsible demanding disgruntleds who, coincidentally, were chronically delinquent in paying their share of the common area infrastructure/maintenance fees.

If people would simply become responsible enough to govern themselves, HOA's would disappear.
 
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