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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
pollinator
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I was just explaining to my daughter two weeks ago when we were looking at an old survey map for our place that the old surveys use this measure...but in my head, never having seen the actual chain, I was picturing it like a heavy iron chain of links like you'd use to pull something with a vehicle. So I'm excited to see what the actual surveyor's chain looked like, so different from my mental picture and so much more practical and lighter for hauling around the landscape.

When I was doing environmental field work in northern Ontario, a number of the lakes were identified as 'bottomless' on the old surveys because the method of measuring depth at that time was to lower the chain until you felt it hitting bottom. If the lake was deeper than a single chain (66 ft I think), they linked chains together until they had enough to reach the bottom. Of course, with multiple chains linked together the sensitivity of fishing for the bottom would be reduced and you might not be able to tell, or maybe they didn't have enough chains on hand to actually hit the bottom - those were the so called 'bottomless' lakes.
 
pollinator
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Hey Andrea Lock,

Glad you enjoyed it, I though either nobody will get it or someone will get it right away and think fondly of it!

So in response to these surveyors not measuring bellow 20.117m or 66 feet.

I have worked undertaking such surveys with modern equipment and It is not a pleasant experience!
So firstly they would have to pull out the chains tighten them and stay in position, then measure bellow all whilst in a small unstable canoe.

I have several thoughts on the matter as to why they called the lakes bottomless as they did.
1. an agreement with the client as to saving money and time.
2. normally a chain would be stretched out tight and then leap frogged across the line of sight (bearing)
3. accurately measuring water depth with a chain was a rare skill, few surveyors could do it accurately!
4. safety of equipment and people, plus it was without a doubt a horrible experience!

I hope this information helps paint a more "in depth" mental image for you Andrea.

Again Glad that people enjoyed the post!


 
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One of these lives here. In perfect condition but I don't have a pic. So here's a pic of a well used one from the web. Took a while to determine what it is. Anyone else care to try?
old-thing.jpg
[Thumbnail for old-thing.jpg]
 
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Is it for crimping hair? Or for crimping something more useful?
 
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It is a"Pleat Maker" for making pleats in fancy dresses that ladies wore back in the 1860s.
 
Andrea Locke
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I think this might be for crimping pleats into clothing, like ruffles. As a person who never irons (unless absolutely necessary, as when sewing), I don't know if this is any more useful than crimping hair
 
Mike Barkley
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Y'all are good! It's for making ruffles & pleats.
 
pollinator
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I saw this photograph posted as a meme on Facebook and I still don't know that these things are.
20124893-C4DC-42AE-A4FD-48CF042242C8.jpeg
45-spindle-adapter-meme
 
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They're to put in the center of a .45 record, to hold it steady, as it spins on a turntable.
 
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Carla Burke wrote:They're to put in the center of a .45 record, to hold it steady, as it spins on a turntable.


I high 5 Carla, old ladies for the win!
Adapter to make a 45 RPM record work on a small center spindle turntable


A dedicated 45 player had a full sized spindle and didn't need the adapter.
 
Ryan M Miller
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

Carla Burke wrote:They're to put in the center of a .45 record, to hold it steady, as it spins on a turntable.


I high 5 Carla, old ladies for the win!
Adapter to make a 45 RPM record work on a small center spindle turntable


A dedicated 45 player had a full sized spindle and didn't need the adapter.



Finally got an answer. They look so much like Beyblade battle top pieces in my millennial head. I had to do a lot of internet searches to figure out what they are.
 
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Here's a thing. It's definately a manufactured thing, but I've very little idea what it is.

It's made of iron, rather rusty from being buried in the garden for a long time. There don't appear to be any holes in it, but it has a definite shape. It may be of agricultural origin, or possible off a boat since we are close to the coast. My foot in welly gives an idea of size.

I don't know what it is do any of you know?
Thing-side-view.JPG
Possible side view
Possible side view
Thing-top-view.JPG
POssible top view
POssible top view
 
pollinator
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The tapered, thin side on the right reminds me of a cutting edge.  
But the lack of a hole makes me rule out a bush hog style rotary cutter blade.
The change in greater thickness on the left makes me think the left side was used to attach it to something, or was the strong side.
The roundedness suggests it could be inserted into a slot.

So my guess is that it is a coulter to an old Norfolk plow.  Something that sliced the ground ahead of a plow.  (See attached stock photo from Alamy)



old-norfolk-plough-plow-tool-farming-cultivation-soil-frame-three-BACBH6.jpg
old-norfolk-plough-plow-tool-farming-cultivation-soil-frame-three-BACBH6
 
Nancy Reading
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George Yacus wrote:
So my guess is that it is a coulter to an old Norfolk plow.  Something that sliced the ground ahead of a plow.  


I'm pretty sure you must be right George. I've found a few pictures of ploughs that show the coulter attached with a shackle, the joddle in the middle brings it back in line with the top of the plough share. I do know that a former owner did plough our land: they grew 'seed' potatoes for export to Ireland and used a horse drawn plough. Legend has it that the horse died in our study, but I'm not sure if it was that horse or another one (!) I wonder where the rest of the plough went?

Thanks very much! Have an apple!
 
Anne Miller
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What is this?  This item is used for something very specific.

 
Nancy Reading
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Wild guess....just the way my mind's working at the moment. Is it a jug for hot drinks like punch? The object that we can see the end of is like a poker which you would heat in the fire then quench in the jug to heat the contents.
 
Anne Miller
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Nancy, you started out cold but getting warmer.
 
Mike Barkley
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Have a hunch that might be for dispensing honey.
 
Anne Miller
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Mike, it won't work for honey.

It is a very New England thing.
 
Carla Burke
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Candle dipping pot?
 
Jay Angler
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One of those New England things for starting a fire? I've forgotten the name, but saw the word recently on permies. I'll go hunting if I'm right!
 
Anne Miller
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Jay, you are right! You get the apple though I am not going to spoil the fun by giving the name of the item and the thread it is from.  I'll let you do that.
 
Jay Angler
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I'll send everyone to the whole thread as it's quite interesting: https://permies.com/t/170661/ungarbage/Matches-lighters#1339893
 
Pearl Sutton
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I have one of those, made of cast iron...

birthday-metal.jpg
Cape-Cod-firestarter
 
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I only have guesses as to what this is. I have two with slightly different lengths. Anyone know?
IMG_20211202_122658991.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20211202_122658991.jpg]
IMG_20211202_122705161.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20211202_122705161.jpg]
 
Carla Burke
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Seems a bit thick, but... shoehorn?
 
Jay Angler
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A little hunting came up with a picture of a similar tool (a little blunter at the tip) which claimed it was an antique potato hand hoe. If you got this tool in Japan, I didn't think they grew many potatoes traditionally, so let's just say, I'm highly suspicious and would want confirmation from a more reliable source???
 
pollinator
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Howdy,
I didn't look at all the postings, so not sure if one of these is posted

Yes it is a hand held saw tooth setter. You do not need a saw vise to use. You can set tooth height to fit against the anvil. When you grip the handles like pliers, it will vise/grip the sawtooth and then also push the tooth against the anvil.

I once was a wilderness wildland firefighter, NO POWER TOOLS, and was the only sharpener on the crew, 7 old time crosscut logging saws. I had the best times of my life!!!
Hope I explained it well.





IMG_3097.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_3097.JPG]
IMG_3096.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_3096.JPG]
IMG_3098.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_3098.JPG]
IMG_3099.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_3099.JPG]
IMG_3109.JPG
disc is anvil with 4 diff. set angles
disc is anvil with 4 diff. set angles
IMG_3111.JPG
setting one side of saw teeth
setting one side of saw teeth
IMG_3104.JPG
setting opposite side teeth
setting opposite side teeth
 
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Yep, we've had a saw set or two posted upstream. It never hurts to have more!

About L's thingy, I wondered if it was some kind of iron. Not necessarily for clothing, but maybe even for making something, like smoothing leather or paper over something while it is glued or fastened in place.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Apple for Jordan for the saw set. Randal, can you explain how it works, please?
:D
 
L. Johnson
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Jordan Holland wrote:
About L's thingy, I wondered if it was some kind of iron. Not necessarily for clothing, but maybe even for making something, like smoothing leather or paper over something while it is glued or fastened in place.



I have a hunch it is a shoe makers tool. I have two very old shoe anvils that I think I posted here. Maybe you could use it to keep the toe shape while stitching it something like that.
 
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L. Johnson wrote:I only have guesses as to what this is. I have two with slightly different lengths. Anyone know?



It is a vintage clothes iron.

Here is a link to a more modern version.   https://www.kanazawa-museum.jp/minzoku/teachers/img/01wear/pic_l_07iron.jpg


And another older one.   https://www.kanazawa-museum.jp/minzoku/teachers/img/01wear/pic_l_04iron.jpg


More overview of vintage Japanese domestic items.  https://www.kanazawa-museum.jp/minzoku/teachers/data_detail01.html

The site is in Japanese but the pictures are pretty telling of what they are displaying.



 
L. Johnson
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Doug Martin wrote:

L. Johnson wrote:I only have guesses as to what this is. I have two with slightly different lengths. Anyone know?



It is a vintage clothes iron.

Here is a link to a more modern version.   https://www.kanazawa-museum.jp/minzoku/teachers/img/01wear/pic_l_07iron.jpg


And another older one.   https://www.kanazawa-museum.jp/minzoku/teachers/img/01wear/pic_l_04iron.jpg


More overview of vintage Japanese domestic items.  https://www.kanazawa-museum.jp/minzoku/teachers/data_detail01.html

The site is in Japanese but the pictures are pretty telling of what they are displaying.





Nice find!
 
Pearl Sutton
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I'm wondering if anyone knows or can figure out what these go to. Dumpster kill, a pair of 6 volt chargers, brand is Nite Lite, which looks like an outdoors type company. But look at the end that plugs into the item. I'd guess that's something like a A/V or audio cable... not a charging cable. Anyone have a clue what these would go to?

 
Jay Angler
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Pearl Sutton wrote:I'm wondering if anyone knows or can figure out what these go to. Dumpster kill, a pair of 6 volt chargers, brand is Nite Lite, which looks like an outdoors type company. But look at the end that plugs into the item. I'd guess that's something like a A/V or audio cable... not a charging cable. Anyone have a clue what these would go to?

I haven't a clue, but this is an opportunity to put in a plug (yes, seriously bad pun alert). I have started putting a label - usually just with masking tape, but a paint-pen would work better for wall warts that travel a lot - specifying what the charger is for. I highly recommend this, because as much as we all *believe* we'll remember what equipment it will go with, many of us won't... sigh...
 
Pearl Sutton
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Yeah, I label chargers and wires etc.
Dumpster kill is a bit more challenging :)  

That one it's the odd input that I'm puzzled by.
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:6 volt chargers, brand is Nite Lite,


Pearl, Nite Lite makes lights for hunting and hiking and stuff, including headlamps. I found an older one with this plug, newer ones seem to use a different one. Now just find the hat, and you can go hunt raccoons (or, if you're like me, hunting slugs and gardening at night).
https://www.amazon.com/Nite-Lite-Rechargeable-Sport-Hunting/dp/B001IM2QVU
 
Pearl Sutton
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Tereza: I just dug through that site again to see if I saw a 6 volt charger, and I still don't. You are right, I did see an8 volt charger using that output. It seems to run one of their battery packs.

Still puzzled!

Although a secondary question is what else uses a 6 volt charger?  :D
 
Legend has it that if you rub the right tiny ad, a genie comes out.
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