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permaculture and diet: the sequel  RSS feed

 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9742
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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How much of your diet are you growing  presently?  Are you growing staples/calorie crops?   Do you use outside inputs in your food production?

My personal answer:  I'm growing maybe 3% of my diet presently; some herbs, vegetables, and chicken eggs.  Chickens get a half-gallon bucket of whole oats (from the feed store) every day.  Garden is mulched with sheep poo and old hay (hay for feed purchased at the feed store).

Please respond with what you are presently eating of your own production.  Thanks! 
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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I would say I'm around 40 %, I don't grow any of our meat and dairy, but we do limit meat and dairy..in Winter we have a lot "put up" but we do tend to buy more fresh stuff in the winter..right now I have a lot of fruits stored away and vegetables in the green house for fresh, but toward spring we'll be buying more as those diminish
 
Paul Cereghino
gardener
Posts: 856
Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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Greens and veges - 100% during growing season.  We'll have beets, parsnips, squash, potatoes and kale, plus some lettuce, plus kraut and kimchee and the weeds in winter... so down to ~40%
Grain - 5% or less,  small grain corn crop and very small dry bean crop this year.  We buy wheat berries from Utah growers, and black beans by the bag, and make around 2 loaves a week of sourdough.  We could ramp up if we had to.
Meat - we contract grow chickens from someone across the bay, and get other delicacies local sausage, shellfish.
Eggs - 100% but we buy in mash from BC for layers, and are slowly setting up paddock system with forage.
Oil and nuts - 2% - all bought in, mostly walnuts and olive, hazelnuts slowly coming to bear.
Fruit - 60% we grow strawberries, raspberries, apples, and got our first plums and pears- plus lots of weird stuff.  Local blueberries picked and in freezer along with wild blackberries.  Lots of snacky bits with low return on investment.  We buy peaches by the box a local guy drives them over from Yakima.

We tend to eat around 75% as greens and veges and fruit by volume, but probably more like 30% of calories (wild guesses)... so i would say 20-40% of our diet comes from our land, depending on how you count the eggs, contract growing, and time of year.

We've been working on various bean-egg-potato staple dishes... various beancakes (falafal inspired), and potato pancakes (latka inspired).

We have disposable income and support local restaurants and have around 1/6 acre that could be brought into staple production, but something else would give, since I think we might be at cruising altitude given the day jobs.  I am starting to control perennial weeds there with annual forage for the chickens.


 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9742
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
184
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I'm impressed and inspired by both of you! 
 
Thelma McGowan
Posts: 170
Location: western Washington, Snohomish county--zone 8b
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I would say 15% of our diet is from our own property. 7 0r 8 meals a week are largely made up of our own eggs or veggies or fruits.
In the summer it is more and in the winter a bit less....so 15% would be an average of a full year.

I typically grow enough Potatoes to last us most of the year.
 
Paul Cereghino
gardener
Posts: 856
Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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I think it is important to not just think about how you are self-sufficient, but how you can support your neighbor who is growing, and connect with your supply lines.

@Ludi - it also doesn't hurt to have ample rain and mild green winters
 
                                          
Posts: 59
Location: N.W. Arizona
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meat:  We raise and butcher, eat fresh, freeze, or can.  About 95%
eggs and poultry:  100%
butter and cheese:  100% we both have teeth and do not drink milk
veggies:  about 40% counting sprouts
fruit:  drought and well pump problems took half our orchard so only 30% now
grains: we make all our bread and pastry. do not have land or water to grow any,  0% 
seafood:  our aquaponic fish farm is not productive yet so 0%
feed and fodder:  counting cottage cheese from whey, weeds, thinings, waste etc 50%
electrical power:  80%  still have a wind genny left to install
transportation fuel:  biodiesel from WVO = 90%
heating fuel:  wood 60%,  biodiesel 40%
cooking fuel: solar oven 20%, wood stove top 10%.  Plan to build biogas digester
 
                                          
Posts: 59
Location: N.W. Arizona
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I forgot beverages:  beer 100% from purchased barley, teas 25% from homegrown herbs.  We drink lots of our good well water 100%
also forgot medicinals:  herbal extracts and tonics 25% homegrown home brewed from purchased another 25%,  50% of treatments are purchased prepared.
spices:  garlic 100%, onions 50%, mint 100%. fennel 100%, basil 100%, salad dressings 90%
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