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animal feed crops

 
kent smith
Posts: 211
Location: Pennsylvania
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We want to plant some easy to care for crops next year to feed to our animals, chickens, hogs, steers. What we have in mind is to grow mangles, sunchokes, and some other root crops. Ideally things that are easy to care for, store well either in the ground or root cellar, and that will store through most of the winter. What have you done in this regard and what would you suggest? We currently bale a small pasture and buy in feed.
Thanks, kent
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Posts: 8975
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Winter squash and pumpkins often do well under tough conditions and most animals seem to like them, though to feed you generally need to chop the fruits up a bit or throw them hard at the ground so they split open.  I've grown some which have kept perfectly for a year at room temperature (varying from 50F to 90F).  I have had best success with traditional native american varieties.  The one I'm growing now, which stores for a year, is I believe Mayo Blusher:  https://www.nativeseeds.org/index.php/store/49/2/seeds/squash/cucurbita-maxima

I've not raised these specifically for animal feed.
 
Abe Connally
Posts: 1502
Location: Chihuahua Desert
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hogs LOVE pumpkins and winter squash.  If you don't break them, they will roll them all around having a great time.

We give them throughout the winter, and next summer, you'll have pumpkins/squash coming up all over the pig pasture!
 
George Lee
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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H Ludi Tyler wrote:
Winter squash and pumpkins often do well under tough conditions and most animals seem to like them, though to feed you generally need to chop the fruits up a bit or throw them hard at the ground so they split open.  I've grown some which have kept perfectly for a year at room temperature (varying from 50F to 90F).  I have had best success with traditional native american varieties.  The one I'm growing now, which stores for a year, is I believe Mayo Blusher:  https://www.nativeseeds.org/index.php/store/49/2/seeds/squash/cucurbita-maxima

I've not raised these specifically for animal feed.
Nice pumpkin variety.. How far along are your melons, Ludi? How cool are your evenings in central tx? I"m a zone 7b/8 in the blue ridge foothills in south carolina.
 
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