Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Now thats what i call Beautiful Compost bins!

 
Posts: 95
Location: Traveling
31
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


How cool are these!!! have you spotted them yet???  no its not the girls!!!  The compost bins are actually the benches and they feed the planters around them :D
I had an idea like this ages ago although i never got around to actually doing anything about it. I was going to use a bath tub worm farm system with a wooden lid as a bench, but this is far better.

they are doing a Croud fund to get this out on the market!

Here is the link if you want to





 
Olof Jönnerstig
Posts: 95
Location: Traveling
31
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This i how they actually look like

the-most-beautiful-compost-bins-in-the-world2.jpg
[Thumbnail for the-most-beautiful-compost-bins-in-the-world2.jpg]
 
Posts: 28
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Olof Jönnerstig wrote:This i how they actually look like



This looks like it would be quite easy to fabricate at home - for much less that the $90 price point, discounted from $120 for backing.
 
Olof Jönnerstig
Posts: 95
Location: Traveling
31
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mj Lacey wrote:

This looks like it would be quite easy to fabricate at home - for much less that the $90 price point, discounted from $120 for backing.



Definitely, you could just dig pit and put a pallet on it and tada... but its not quite the same feel  :D

well what I like about it is that it is made to last and its easy, and can go mainstream which can get more people growing their own food etc :)
 
Mj Lacey
Posts: 28
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Olof Jönnerstig wrote:

Mj Lacey wrote:

This looks like it would be quite easy to fabricate at home - for much less that the $90 price point, discounted from $120 for backing.



Definitely, you could just dig pit and put a pallet on it and tada... but its not quite the same feel  :D

well what I like about it is that it is made to last and its easy, and can go mainstream which can get more people growing their own food etc :)



Even easier with a plastic container and some holes drilled in the side. Make a lid to fit, simple hinge and its the same thing - even stick a seat on the top! Probably total cost of $25.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3105
Location: Toronto, Ontario
380
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yeah. I love the idea, but the execution leaves a bit to be desired. I don't know if introducing that much more plastic per person is worth the potential for converts. I think it might be done better on an individual level from reclaimed items.

I love the idea though. I could see incorporating something similar in a raised bed or hugelbeet, such that not only would I have a centralised worm farm to digest compost and move nutrients around, but also a centralised seat for the planting and harvesting of things around it.

-CK
 
pollinator
Posts: 333
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
96
urban books building solar rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thd DIY folks are always going to come up with something made of whatever they have at hand.

I scanned the campaign for mention of the plastic and what/where/how it’s made, and nothing. No mention of materials or recycled content.😕 That seems like a missed opportunity.

But considering food waste as a huge problem, and using plastic garbage cans and bags to avoid dealing with it, or using a second container to separate food waste for collecting... making this worm bin product is at least a zero sum solution.

As a tool to encourage gardening, reduce or at least spotlight food waste, and keep the solution personal/local rather than a separate municipal/corporate “waste stream” that magically disappears without another thought... This could help mainstream the ideas, by being a turnkey product that’s easy to adopt.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2280
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
178
books composting toilet bee rocket stoves wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These, by the scale, look like they are aimed at composting kitchen waste. How many people are genuinely going to want to sit on top of a compost bin full of kitchen scraps?
 
Chris Kott
pollinator
Posts: 3105
Location: Toronto, Ontario
380
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A properly managed compost bin full of kitchen scraps won't smell. And a composter that is incorporated into life, as opposed to squirreled away behind a shed, is much more likely to be properly tended.

This is effectively a soil-linked vermiculture bin, anyway, and probably should be used that way, as opposed to a hot compost. I might incorporate some kind of charcoal filter in the lid, should I actually want to sit on it for long periods, but if the worms are catered to, the other soil life will be happy.

The concept is one I could work with, even if its not a product I would buy.

-CK
 
Kenneth Elwell
pollinator
Posts: 333
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
96
urban books building solar rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Michael Cox, given the tools and the opportunity, I think this negative viewpoint can be changed. The commercial installations in the campaign looked to be outdoor cafes where diners can be introduced to the concept. As much a way of reducing food waste (therefore volume of ‘scraps to sit on’ ) as it is a compost/gardening project.

Chris Kott, ‘we’ may not be the target audience, but as you say you support the concept. The product is the bridge between “I can do that” and “I will do that”. For others, this plus a mail order raised bed, and a patio becomes a kitchen garden that closes the loop.
 
garden master
Posts: 1279
Location: Maine, zone 5
398
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I tell people that don't compost, but don't garden and therefore don't want to that they can just lay the kitchen scraps on the forest floor, or rake the forest duff over if they'd like, they look at me like I'm telling them to throw trash in the woods and am a bit touched in the head....probably true, but that seems unrelated.  People are all over the place in their understanding of our world.
 
Posts: 7
Location: Pennsylvania
1
foraging rabbit building
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kenneth Elwell wrote:As a tool to encourage gardening, reduce or at least spotlight food waste, and keep the solution personal/local rather than a separate municipal/corporate “waste stream” that magically disappears without another thought... This could help mainstream the ideas, by being a turnkey product that’s easy to adopt.



Agreed—it's an approachable gateway to a greener lifestyle for people rooted in mainstream western culture. It's as glamorous as composting gets. If it opens eyes and minds, the positives outweigh the negatives. Good on you, Subpod.
 
Kenneth Elwell
pollinator
Posts: 333
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
96
urban books building solar rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:When I tell people that don't compost, but don't garden and therefore don't want to that they can just lay the kitchen scraps on the forest floor, or rake the forest duff over if they'd like, they look at me like I'm telling them to through trash in the woods and am a bit touched in the head....probably true, but that seems unrelated.  People are all over the place in their understanding of our world.


Bud Mino wrote:Agreed—it's an approachable gateway to a greener lifestyle for people rooted in mainstream western culture. It's as glamorous as composting gets. If it opens eyes and minds, the positives outweigh the negatives. Good on you, Subpod.


Both replies, a perfect illustration of the Wheaton Eco Scale at work. Those more than one level removed from you think you are weird or doing it wrong, and three or four levels removed you are just plain crazy!
The most ecological method to compost, maybe not? but compared to what? status quo... to landfill? WAY better... Reducing waste + composting? better yet... Growing and eating homegrown food? Even better still...
There are so many ways to get started on this path, and for one it might be composting, for another it might be energy conservation, and the more opportunities to reach out to and motivate people the better.
 
Chris Kott
pollinator
Posts: 3105
Location: Toronto, Ontario
380
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So where is this product on the Wheaton Eco-Scale? Maybe 1?

I mean, it is a pretty advanced step if it's one of your first on the path.

-CK
 
Kenneth Elwell
pollinator
Posts: 333
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
96
urban books building solar rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Entrance to Level 2?
Lots of vectors for adoption though...
Well suited for urban areas with small lots, with no soil or contaminated soils, HOA restrictions on "gardening", easy for limited mobility, relocatable for renters...
 
master steward
Posts: 10036
Location: Pacific Northwest
3924
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It also looks nice enough that HOAs might not complain.

To me, it's a prettified keyhole garden



But, not everyone is as skilled as Raven to make a lovely one [url=]like hers[/url]




I remember being at the stage where I wanted to be a gardener but had no idea how, and stuff like this looked REALLY tempting to me. "Someone did all the hard work and made something perfectly so I don't have to biff it up!"

I think this thing is perfect for someone who has money, but not time, and not much skills and feels unable to tackle a compost bin. This does the hard work for them. And, yeah, it used plastic. So do most compost tumblers...
 
And tomorrow is the circus! We can go to the circus! I love the circus! We can take this tiny ad:
All of the video from the Eat Your Dirt Summit
https://permies.com/t/106759/video-Eat-Dirt-Summit
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!