Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Pressure Cooking water

 
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wonder if anybody else pressure boils their city water?  I saw that chloramine had a boiling point just under the boiling point of water and it seems to work, because just boiling doesn't seem to get rid of the chloramine part.  I put it in a gallon milk container afterwards and leave out in the sun to get rid of any boiled taste.
 
pollinator
Posts: 168
Location: Manila
33
urban cooking solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi William, have you considered home filtration systems?

https://healthykitchen101.com/best-countertop-water-filters
 
pioneer
Posts: 79
Location: Sydney, Australia. Subtropics
31
forest garden urban medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm also trying to remove chloramine from my water to use on my worm farm. I have a pressure cooker, and just realised I could use the waste water after cooking beans, which might have some bonus nutrients too. The only problem is, how do you know if the chloramine has been removed?
 
gardener & author
Posts: 1678
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
267
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Inside a pressure cooker, very little of the steam or other material comes out, so how would pressure cooking reduce the chloramine?
 
Ben Schiavi
pioneer
Posts: 79
Location: Sydney, Australia. Subtropics
31
forest garden urban medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Inside a pressure cooker, very little of the steam or other material comes out, so how would pressure cooking reduce the chloramine?



When you finish cooking with your pressure cooker do you let it cool naturally, put cold water over it or use the quick release button? I take my pressure cooker outside as soon as I'm done cooking and press the release button. Steam comes out like crazy, and I'm assuming that's when the chloramine comes out.
 
Posts: 155
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
what about the fluoride put in city water?

http://fluoridealert.org/news/movement-to-remove-fluoride-from-us-water-supplies-continues/
 
pollinator
Posts: 3112
Location: Toronto, Ontario
381
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In a pressure cooker, the boiling point rises with the pressure. I don't think the whole mass of water within the container boils when you hit the quick release, or else the reaction would be a tad bit more explosive. That means that some of the contents aren't going to boil, and won't turn into steam, and won't offgas, unless that lid comes off when the water is still sufficiently above boiling point at ambient temperature. Otherwise, the pressure drops, as does the temperature, and the water that reacts is that subject to the change in pressure of the air surrounding it, because water doesn't compress. I think it's chemist/physicist time.

I don't really know about the fluoride thing, but I have been told, even by dentists that still support the fluoridation of the water supply, that it's a little silly even to put fluoride in toothpaste, unless you don't rinse your mouth afterwards. Otherwise, the fluoride simply isn't in contact with your teeth for long enough.

So if it's not in contact long enough to have an effect when you apply it as a paste directly to the teeth and scrub it in, why would it work any better being washed over the teeth in the process of drinking, at a concentration much less than that of toothpaste?

I am deliberately avoiding the topic of the negative health consequences of fluoride, as I am not particularly well-versed in them, though I have read about its accumulation in the pituitary gland, if I recall correctly. We are strolling along the no-man's land right beside the Cider Press, gazing over the minefield of Toxic Gick, though, so if we want to keep it out, let's just leave it at the statement that some people disagree with being dosed with chemicals in their water and feel that they have questionable beneficial and detrimental effects.

What I'd love is if a chemist could chime in on chlorine, chloramine, fluoride, and any other water treatment or additive chemical, the efficacy of filtration for removal of said, the possibility of distillation for removal, and other options.

For me, pressure cooking is useful against biological contaminants, and for things that break down into their component parts under extreme heat and pressure. And for goulash and stews, and curries. Oh, and distillation, which might be a solution, but again, we'd need a chemist to weigh in.

-CK
 
Can't .... do .... plaid .... So I did this tiny ad instead:
Got a New Homestead? Here is What You Need to Know to Before You Start a Homestead
https://permies.com/t/97104/Starting-homestead-strong-foundation
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!