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Chain saw chain

 
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When i go to the chainsaw shop and have a new chain put on i think i,m getting a bog standard chain . What could i use for a bit more grunt in the cutting and preservation of the cutting edge . I,m cutting mostly pine and oak.
Husqvarna 235 user.

Thanks
 
gardener
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Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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If your firewooding ask for a skip tooth chain.  Less teeth to sharpen and they seem to stay sharp longer.
 
Malcolm Thomas
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Thanks for the reply. I think it is a good quality chain i,m being sold but i want to experiment with something else .
I file my chain sharp almost down to nothing left as i want to get the best value .
 
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changing and or adjusting the chain are the easiest things you can do to maintain a chainsaw
try doing it youreself to save some money
make sure that the little tension peg is in the hole on the bar and make sure the bar is seated flat before tightening completely
you may need to turn the tension screw a little to a loose chain position and once everything is in position
but before the 2 nuts are snugged up you adjust the chain tension
the chain should not hang off the bar.
just right is when you pull on the chain mid way along the bar.. the bottom of the chain links should just barely show
too tight is when you use the saw and without the chain brake on.. the chain comes quickly to a stop when you take your finger off the throttle

that said, a chain can be sharpened many times before it is no longer functional
pretty much until the teeth are almost non existent
most importantly when sharpening a chain is to sharpen each tooth by the same amount to keep the teeth the same size
this will keep youre saw cutting straight
the easiest way to do that is with a grinder wheel made for chainsaw sharpening
at our shop we have 3 each set up with a different size wheel for the different chain gauges
they can be bought at places like (here in canada) princess auto
for a reasonable price... if you want to spend less you can buy a round file and sharpen by hand
same thing though you need to try to keep the teeth the same shape, and maintain the angles of the tooth

after a certain amount of sharpening by machine or by hand and the teeth become less aggressive
there are flat pieces of metal between teeth which determine the cutting depth and you will need to take a flat file and ever so slightly lower each of them
too aggressive of chain is more likely to kick back and may bog down due to biting off more than it can chew so to speak
sometimes a flat file to the bar to remove burrs from the sides may be necessary
there is a tool to file the edge that the chain rides along to keep the flat file(built in) at the correct 90 angle

when sharpening a chain on a grinder it is important to do this in tiny bursts of grinding with pauses in between
this is to keep the tooth from getting too hot and loosing its temper
if it is heated too much the metal will dull much sooner as it has lost its hardness

harder chains like carbide used by emergency personnel are unnecessary unless you plan on cutting through a lot of metal etc in the wood
by dialing in the chain to the type of wood you are cutting you should get good results

i plan to get a diamond chainsaw for rock cutting (maybe)
but these more so sand the material away rather than cut it

anyhow hopefully i stayed on topic enough and that helped!
 
s. drone
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ok so i missed the replies while typing a response
so you already know what i covered
for other people reading this.. there is one step i neglected to mention
when putting the chain back on
it is good to pull up on the end of the bar while tightening the nuts
this will help put the bar in the correct position (provided the peg is in the hole and the bar is flat against the saw)

also once you use the saw for the fist time it may come out of adjustment slightly
loosen the nuts enough to tighten/loosen the tension screw
tighten the nuts and see how it runs
 
pollinator
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hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
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great response drone. Also when the chain heats up, it will tend to sag- especially in colder months. You will often need to tighten it up. Just make darn sure you loosen it before the chain cools or you will stretch your chain and it won't fit. This is especially true for longer chains.
 
Malcolm Thomas
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Ok thanks for the info, now looking for a chain.
 
Tj Jefferson
pollinator
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
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I can't see where you are, on mobile, but there's often a place you can get chains made custom. You need to know sproket size and type, bar length/width and end gear (should match sprocket) and then tell them what problem you are having. I get chains made once a year, at a specialty shop, generally $1 per inch or about, brand new stihl chains. Most places rip you off. At the same time I like to get my rakers reset and cutters set professionally. Costs me $5-$7 a chain because these guys process hundreds. Saves your saw to run sharp chains. Keeps you from getting hurt.

Check with tree guys in your area, they know where to go.

 
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