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pictures of your dyed fibers and their projects

 
Posts: 37
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books fiber arts sheep wood heat
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This is a picture of some linen that I dyed a few yrs ago. It was a a fun summer project that my son and I worked on.
dying-linen.jpg
[Thumbnail for dying-linen.jpg]
 
Liza Stallsmith
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books fiber arts sheep wood heat
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This picture is some of the dyed linen above on my loom. Sorry I should of had these in the same post, but am trying to learn how to conquer the posting picture thing. I would love to see pictures of what others have dyed and their projects!
weaving-linen.jpg
[Thumbnail for weaving-linen.jpg]
 
Posts: 7469
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1347
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Hi Liz, great idea for a thread and beautiful yarns.
Seems like I end up with a lot of golds and yellows as they are the easiest to grow and or accumulate (my husbands bodark wood shavings).
I'm trying to get a few patches of madder growing now and more woad while trying not to take up too much vegetable production space


These wool yarns were dyed with cosmos, onion skins, bodark and weld.  

https://permies.com/t/15888/fiber-arts/growing-harvesting-natural-dye-plants#256716

This second photo is a pile of thrift store fabrics from blouses and shirts, silks, hemp, rami and cottons dyed with turmeric (not a reliable lightfast, washable dye but beautiful for a brief time) and the blue at the bottom is woad.

https://permies.com/t/15888/fiber-arts/growing-harvesting-natural-dye-plants#278429

Linens, cottons, silks........again thrift store fabrics, dyed with bodark and weld.

https://permies.com/t/15888/fiber-arts/growing-harvesting-natural-dye-plants#272645
 
Liza Stallsmith
Posts: 37
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books fiber arts sheep wood heat
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Judith,
I love your colors. I am intrigued by the woad and the redying of second hand fabric. Not that your other dyes aren't amazing too. I shop second hand stores all the time, but I don't think I have ever redyed something from there. I must admit that I came into the dyeing magic through kool aid and food dyes. But I  am very interested in learning  how to use natural dyes safely. Do you have your own dyer's garden. I would have a hard time getting dye material from my husband as he uses most stuff for his barktanning. lol
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 7469
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1347
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Liza, I start with natural or white fabric for dyeing.  I think indigo will overdye a chemical dye but no others that I know of.
I do sometimes use soy milk as a binder on cellulose fibers to give a natural dye some protein to adhere to.

Raven has a thread devoted to woad https://permies.com/t/76750/fiber-arts/Woad-growing-harvesting-dyeing

Here's one on indigo https://permies.com/t/37159/fiber-arts/Indigo-blue-growing-harvesting-processing

The links at my pictures above are to a more general dye discussion.

I tend to add dye plants to the mix everywhere as many of them are also attractive to pollinator's and many quite beautiful.
Bright Lights cosmos, for example, give that wonderful deep orange from the flowers and the butterflies and hummingbirds love them.  I pick the blooms to dry just past full so everyone has a chance.  They keep blooming all summer because of the deadheading and there's always lots of seed for next year and volunteers.

Beware, as you might have already found out, there's a 'rabbit hole' of information out there

 
Liza Stallsmith
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Thanks for the links. I have never tried woad, but have done indigo.

Here is a picture of braintan elk scraps. They are samples of before and after a Walnut dye
IMG_20190407_152439820.jpg
walnut dyed elk hide
 
steward
Posts: 5104
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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This robe was dyed with turmeric and paprika. Powdered spices added directly to the water with some vinegar to make an acidic pH. Then simmered for an hour. Followed by washing with water/vinegar.

Turmeric is light sensitive, and it is only a mechanical dye. It doesn't get chemically bound to the cloth, so it leaches out during subsequent washings, and fades after about 5 days of full on sunlight. Nice thing about turmeric as a dye, is that it's simple to add a bit of turmeric and vinegar to the wash water, to keep refreshing the dye. I wash clothing without soaps. Soaps might mess with the color, and turn it dark orange. I store my turmeric dyed clothing on a dark shelf.  

turmeric-robe.jpg
dying with turmeric and paprika
100% cotton, dyed with turmeric and paprika
 
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