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Is this Escarpment Black Cherry?

 
master pollinator
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Saw this tree along the road and I'm wondering if it is our regional Black Cherry Prunus serotina var. eximia

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pollinator
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I am completely uncertain of the latin name of what folks here call Blackcherry, but the bark on it is distinctively horizontally striped, quite smooth, and prone to peeling in a papery way..

IF this name is the same tree in your region the bark looks wrong. (If that trunk is the tree in question..)
 
Tyler Ludens
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The tree trunk in the background is an Oak.  I will try to get a photo of the "Cherry" trunk today.
 
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Black Cherry Identification

Tyler, the link above should help you with Identification. (it does look like Prunus serotina)

Redhawk
 
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Looking at the leaves and the blooms i'd say probably but i'd need a picture of the bark of the "cherry" to be sure.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Here's the trunk:

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Tyler Ludens
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There are older specimens in the neighborhood that seem to have that flaky-looking bark, so yes I'm pretty sure it is Escarpment Black Cherry.  Now just how to get some for our place!
 
Jonathan Ward
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I agree.  Black Cherry.
 
Jonathan Ward
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They grow really well from seed but most wild ones here in North America take 10 - 15 years to fruit.
 
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I have good results grafting sweet cherries (Stella) onto sour or flowering cherry rootstock. Whip and tongue, early spring has worked well. They should be easily budded in late summer, I think. So if you gather scions or budwood from wild trees that are mature and fruiting, you'll shorten or skip that long wait.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Jonathan Ward wrote:They grow really well from seed but most wild ones here in North America take 10 - 15 years to fruit.



I'm not concerned with getting fruit from them for myself, but having them on the land for the future.

Maybe if I am extremely vigilant I can collect fruit.  I drive past them twice a week.

 
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