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Spike extractor YOU could make

 
pollinator
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Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
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Here's a piece of gear that could be quite useful around the homestead.  It enables you to extract spikes in conjunction with a handheld power drill.  Some fairly common homestead-shop tools are needed to make it, but it doesn't require unusual ones or highly refined skills.

Though it's not shown in the video, looks to me like (using a mallet) you might be able to drive the "claw" portion under a spike head that's sitting flush with the wood, to start the extraction.  Angle iron, used to make the claw, is usually quite strong, tough steel and would likely stand up to the poinding.

This tool could be very useful for demolition and for salvaging lumber for rough-construction re-use.

 
gardener
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Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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Cool tool Joel!   With this you can get those  spikes out without bending them.  Thanks for sharing!
 
Joel Bercardin
pollinator
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Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
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Here’s a vid about making a quick-action vise from scrap steel and a junked caulking gun (common, cheap variety).

The making process is pretty simple.  The only tool he shows that I, personally, would have to borrow from a neighbour is the tap he uses.  One little improvement I’d make is to drill two holes on the bottom of that angle-iron, on each side (four holes, in total) where the unit sits on the bench — that way I could screw it to a benchtop if I wanted to keep the vise immobile while I’m working on something clamped in it.


Quick-Vise.png
[Thumbnail for Quick-Vise.png]
 
master pollinator
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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All of the nails in the demonstration were quite easy to pull.  None of them were hammered in all the way. None were embedded in difficult wood that really holds a nail. This thing doesn't look strong enough to be struck the way you would with a nail claw. It might have some application but I couldn't see using it for anything I do and I have pulled hundreds of pounds of nails.

I really like my pneumatic nail extractor. It only works on boards that have already been pulled off, since it is placed over the pointy end of the nail and then it shoots them out. I paid about $75. It pays for itself again, everytime I recycle a bunch of tongue-and-groove flooring.

I'd be very surprised if that gizmo in the first video could survive a full day with me using it. And it's slower than using a good nail claw and pry bar.
 
Joel Bercardin
pollinator
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Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
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A fair criticism I'd say, Dale. Each person would have to decide whether it would serve him in his application/needs.  I always do before I make some gizmo.
 
pollinator
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I have a nail/staple puller from the old days. It has a slide hammer and all that, but I never use it. It does not work that good.

I have moved quite a bit of fencing for my sheep, but found the easiest way to pull the wire from the staples is to actually use a generator, a hand held grinder, and a thin metal cut off wheel. Using that, and (5) cut off wheels, I successfully removed, and then reinstalled, 10 acres of sheep fence. That does not sound like much, but it was around half a mile of wire, staples multiple times to posts 16 feet on center.

Note: You would think when moving fence you could just pull the wire up, fence posts and all, then pound them back into the ground, but it dos not work that way; it is impossible to get the fence tight. Instead, the wire must be removed from the fence posts before being it put back up in the new field. The grinder helps cut the staples off in quick fashion.
 
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