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Composting in an aerated liquid?

 
gardener
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Aerated compost tea is made from finished compost.
Weed tea fertilizer is made anaerobicly from freshly harvested leaves.
What happens if you aerate a weed tea fertilizer,  rather than leaving it untouched?
Would it compost faster?
If we added kitchen waste,  would we get the same kind of results?
Would chicken bones break down such a soup?
 
master pollinator
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This is basically how a powered septic tank works. In areas that don't have good percolation, you can still have a septic tank, with an aeration function. It breaks down waste pretty quickly.
 
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Wouldn't the added and escaping air contribute to an odor problem around the septic tank?
 
Dale Hodgins
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Aerobic decay doesn't produce the awful smells associated with septic systems.
 
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I'm thinking about trying this out and additionally using it to compost humanure.  I figure that this type of composting may work better in the desert provided evaporation from the composting vessel is minimal. As it is, kitchen scraps dry up too quickly and I don't seem to have sufficient quantity to get a large pile going. In experimenting with this, I'd also want to learn to do my own testing to assure safety of the finished product. I'm guessing a microscope would be used to look for pathogenic organisms. If trials work well, it might even make sense to install a "normal" flush toilet that would transport human nutrients directly into the composting vessel. I'm guessing that it would be likely that this setup would still use water amounts in excess of the amount needed for composting and in excess of the amount of water needed for watering/fertilizing plants. If so, this may put me back to the idea of using a non-funnel based urine diversion setup.
I did notice that the dung beetles don't seem to wake up and get to work until about 2-3 hours after sunrise so one might do well to cover with soil any dung beetle food deposited after their quitting time and before their day starts. This may assist in keeping it moist enough for the dung beetles as well as keeping flies from getting to it.
 
William Bronson
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There is a design floating around for a vermiculture filtered flush toilet.
Essentially it's a big pile of woodchips in an insulated IBC tote, populated by worms and plumbed to a toilet.
I'm trialing something similar for my laundry grey water.

In hot dry environment, I wonder if a solar still might be an option.
By purposefully evaporating the water and capturing the condensate, you might be able to irrigate and pasteurize in one fell swoop.
 
pollinator
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See, what I was wondering in another thread was if you had a vortex brewer with a bubbler at the bottom and an optimised biology thriving within it and you dropped your contributions into it daily, would it work to rapidly digest the pathogens in the poop?

Because I figure if you had such a system, and the decomposers living in the bubbling, swirling soup were able to stay ahead of the pathogens, a second stage, like a dynamic holding tank, also swirling and bubbling, could finish the process before being applied to soil, whereupon the dynamic holding tank is refilled from the first tank and set to swirl and bubble once again.

With sufficient capacity, this system could also be readily used for food scraps, both in lieu of regular composting and including items that would draw pests under normal composting conditions, for those without livestock or pets to feed scraps to. If the system was robust to eat human poo, animal wastes wouldn't pose any especial bother, except perhaps for cat feces and those of other obligate carnivores.

-CK
 
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