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Dairy all year round

 
Posts: 15
Location: Fajã d'Agua, Brava, Cabo Verde
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Yes, there I read it: "...If you're after dairy all year round, you might need to kid different does at different times of the year,..."

I am wondering if and how that would be possible.
So far -sharing my thoughts and wishes with other goat keepers- I heared things like: just possible with hormones, because goats are naturally in heat just in this after summer months.
I dare to doubt that, and besides I would never do such a thing: unnaturally mess around with healthy animals. So I would love advise on how to let my goats kid (naturally) at different times of the year.
My situation: I have two groups with in each 2 adult does, 1 first-time-mom and (since january/february) in each group 2 female offspring.
I was thinking to give the first-time-moms a break, and try to get them pregnant not earlier than January/February 2020. Together with the newborns of 2019.

Looking forward to advice and/or ideas, suggestions

 
Posts: 6
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I think (therefore I'm probably wrong) the two groups will have to be significantly separate, because they will all tend to go into heat about the same time if they are "together". I think this means more than a fence between them! (And experimenting to see just HOW MUCH separation will make a real contribution to goat science!)
 
Marijke Katsburg
Posts: 15
Location: Fajã d'Agua, Brava, Cabo Verde
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I love science!
The parameters: one group is living next to my house, about 5 m. The other group is living on the other side of the house, about 100 m. and a bit lower (5 m) They cannot see each other. They might hear each other, like they can hear the goats high in the mountains or the two or three at sealevel, 100 m in front of our place.
 
pollinator
Posts: 243
Location: Tasmania
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goat wood heat homestead
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It would depend on the goat breed. Some are seasonal breeders, only able to breed in autumn/winter, others breed at different times of the year.

For pure dairy goats, you can usually get away with getting them in kid in alternate years, so each goat will kid only every second year. They have longer lactations than other breeds, and most of them will stay in milk for 2 years.

For seasonal breeders with shorter lactations, you could get one in kid very early in the season, and one very late. Here in Tasmania, that would mean we'd have one kidding in September and one in December.

For goats that aren't seasonal breeders it's much easier.

All of these options would mean keeping the buck separate from the does.
 
Posts: 18
Location: Lasqueti Island, British Columbia
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Right now i have 1 nubian who is about to kid, one sannen who kidded about 2 months ago and i am milking. and in about 2 more months i will have an alpine kid. The alpine i will keep in milk thru the winter as she does very well with this and is a breeze to milk. All of these goats live together. The sannen i took to the buck and the nubian i took her to the buck and the alpine i brought the buck to the goats. This is a lot easier in a small community where i can easily communicate with the goat owners because i know who they are.

So its defiantly possible to have varied milk supply. One goat is going into milk as one is coming out of milk. It all depends on your needs. I at the moment milk in the morning, and have to clean the milk dishes only once as apposed to milking twice a day which i have more time for in the winter a long with a lot more hot water due to the woodstove.

All of this was possible with not owning a buck. If i had a buck i would need to either keep him separate or have him with a buck apron.

what breed of goats do you own?
 
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