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Recycling/disposal of older water system equipment

 
pollinator
Posts: 845
Location: Southern Oregon
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So, the property I bought has been through multiple owners, and each new owner just added new bits, nothing was disposed of. Nothing is terribly old, both houses were built in the 1980's. With a little research it appears that the old/not being used water softener unit can just be dumped. I'm not a fan of junking things but I don't want/need a water softener and I don't think anyone else would want a 10+ year old unit (if I'm wrong let me know). There is also an old pressure tank that doesn't work. And a whole house RO system. I thought I could get some money for that but the plumbers didn't think it would be worth it. And I have two pressured tanks that I would think need special disposal, but I'm having trouble finding much information on this, which is probably why they have just been left.

So, just to clarify why I'm looking to dispose of these things, this property has numerous complicated systems and equipment that is not being used just gets in the way, confuses everyone trying to figure stuff out.

On the flip side, anyone local who is interested in some of the stuff I have, just PM me.
 
Posts: 319
Location: South Central Kansas
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Stacy Witscher wrote:So, the property I bought has been through multiple owners, and each new owner just added new bits, nothing was disposed of. Nothing is terribly old, both houses were built in the 1980's. With a little research it appears that the old/not being used water softener unit can just be dumped. I'm not a fan of junking things but I don't want/need a water softener and I don't think anyone else would want a 10+ year old unit (if I'm wrong let me know). There is also an old pressure tank that doesn't work. And a whole house RO system. I thought I could get some money for that but the plumbers didn't think it would be worth it. And I have two pressured tanks that I would think need special disposal, but I'm having trouble finding much information on this, which is probably why they have just been left.

So, just to clarify why I'm looking to dispose of these things, this property has numerous complicated systems and equipment that is not being used just gets in the way, confuses everyone trying to figure stuff out.

On the flip side, anyone local who is interested in some of the stuff I have, just PM me.



Why not make them into tempering tanks?

Cold water into one, output from that one to input from the other, and output from that to the hot water tank?

Water will warm to surrounding temperature when not needed which is typically warmer than the water incoming to the house.

Takes less energy to heat 70deg F water than 50 deg F water.

We did that on two apt buildings.
Yes it did cut the cost about 10-15%-ish depending on usage and temperatures.

But we used old electric hot water heaters with insulation removed and put them on 2 layers of concrete blocks to get them closer to the basement ceiling.

A bypass line was added to bypass them during summer months.

It even helped cut laundry costs.

You could use them as rainwater collection too.

At one point we installed a 'Clear Wave' electronic water softener. That too improved things a bit with nothing added to the water.
Less soap, less shampoo in the shower, less dish soap. Cleaner fixtures (none of that powdery calcium deposits). It also kept the shower nozzles open.
It does take about 90 days for it to clean out the old deposits depending on how much water you use.
Costs about a nickel a month I think to run it.
User installable if you can RTFI (read the friendly instructions).

A Clear Wave won't help if you use rain water though.

Be aware though. I put one on my brother's old plumbing (50+ year old) that was all calcified.

It worked so well that every valve in the house leaked!
Seems the calcium was plugging existing leaks.

He grumbled a lot but he soon realized he had better water pressure and such after he replace all those old valves.
Shower didn't dribble out anymore.

And he SMELLED better too LOLOLOL
(I tease him about it).



 
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