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Kale recipes???

 
master steward
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So, my garden loves to sprout and grow and reseed kale and daikon radishes. The radishes never grow much root, but we get a lot of leaves. I also have nasturtium leaves. They all seem to have pretty similar flavors, and I'd love for us to eat more of them. What can I cook with these?

My husband/kids can't eat rough leaves much, because their bodies don't digest roughage well--it comes out undigested (and, in the case of my husband, in diarrhea form). So, the leaves need to be cooked.

Right now, I make kale/nasturtium/radish-leaf chips, and through some leaves in soup when I make soup. Too hot for soup right now. I also cook up the greens with garlic, salt and pepper. But, I'd love more variety! What are your favorite kale recipes?
 
pollinator
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I use all my kale to make kale chips and salad so I have no good advice but I wanted to say thanks for the idea to try nasturtium-leaf and radish-leaf chips since I have both!
 
pollinator
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Stir-fry or steam, then marinate in rice wine vinegar, tamari/soy sauce/braggs, and ginger. Add some sweet if you like that. I sometimes put in some carob molasses. Sprinkle on toasted sesame and eat cold or warm. I prefer cold.  Add in other vegetables if you want -thinly shaved carrots, cabbage, radishes, etc.

I'm eating this right now with some chickpeas. It's a regular summer meal for us.
 
pollinator
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I mainly chop it into ribbons (chiffonade) and add it to stews/casseroles/curries/etc.  I generally add a lot!  Chard too.  The only time I cook it on its own is for a roast dinner, and of course it must be eaten with gravy in this case :)
 
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I make a greens based light stew. I told my wife it was a cooked salad, but she still wouldn’t eat it. I just cook beans, mushrooms, a few vegetables, onions or garlic, and add lots of greens. This and a salad keeps me from the beer belly that hit me at forty.
Recently I’ve been using this stew to make a savory oatmeal.
 
gardener & author
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I mostly add it to soups and stews. As a side dish, I really like it cooked in the fat leftover from frying sausages or bacon, I think fat and salt compliment kale really well, onions and garlic do too.

Recently I made cabbage in a roux/cream/cheese sauce and it was really tasty, I think kale would work well in creamy cheesy sauces too. Maybe kale gratin, from kale and garlic cooked in cream or roux sauce, sprinkled with cheese and then broiled or baked until the cheese is lightly browned.

There's a Spanish dish I make with silverbeet that would work with kale - fry up an onion, and some bacon or chorizo if you have it, stir through the greens, add some toasted seeds or chopped nuts and some raisins, if you didn't have meat then you can sprinkle through some smoked paprika and salt at the end.

Colcollan is an Irish dish with cooked kale mashed into potatoes with plenty of butter.

Kale could be dehydrated and then snuck into other dishes and drinks.
 
pollinator
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I like to dry my greens and powder them.  I can mix them in flours for desserts and baked goods, mix them into soup broths, add them to egg dishes, or put them in sauces.  I've found that dehydrated green, especially kale, get SUPER SWEET when their sugars concentrate through drying.  I used to love making green chocolate chip cookies with kale-powder flour infusions
 
pollinator
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Similar to your kale chips I've been making kale crackers, a thicker heartier version that uses many more greens.  While I haven't yet used nasturtiums or radish leaves in them I've used many other types of edible leaves with no failures yet.  I just recently did a blog about them:  https://theartisthomestead.com/a-stupendously-healthy-snack-cracker/

I also have been using large amount of kale and other greens in just about any dish I've been cooking.  One that I think will become a future blog post is vegan potstickers.  For the base mix of this I've been mincing up 8 oz of mushrooms, one of the large onions often sold individually by the pound (or an equivalent amount of bagged onions), some ground flax seeds, 1 to 1.5 inches of fresh ginger root finely minced, a tablespoon or so of miso paste, and then a bunch of finely chopped vegetables which is where the kale can come in along with many other greens or carrots, or cabbages, even asparagus.  This is all cooked up together to make the filling.  Then I get potsticker wrappers from the store and go from there.
 
pollinator
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I really like to stew greens in a mixture of broth and vinneagar for a long time until they are pretty much a mush. That can then be eaten as a side or on top of a grain. It's basically an old southern style collard green but I do it with just about any green. It takes longer than you think but you can also just water it down and turn it into a soup if you get tired of waiting.
 
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Stir fried it with spring onions and cashews.
 
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Location: Sedona, AZ & Koh, Chang, Thailand
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Raw Kale Salad

Cut out the stems, and chop the remaining leaves finely into ribbons.

Place in a stainless or ceramic bowl and add 1/2 - 1 lemons worth of juice and some sea salt.

Mash the kale by hand for a few minutes.  No need to be gentle.

Place covered in the fridge for a few hours and then repeat.

After 2-3 times you will have a lovely, raw kale salad.

I like to add brewers yeast and gomasio prior to serving.

(This idea, based on a typical supermarket bunch size.)

 
pollinator
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i pickle radish greens (just a quick salt brine pickle, although you can use them to make chinese style pickled mustard greens) because I really don't like to eat them raw.
Kale, I cook, throw in asian broths with noodles, on top of a savory pancake, omelets... in fact cooked greens and eggs (with mushrooms or peppers or onions, or not) is an excellent combination.
You could also make Indian saag/sarson ka saag with radish greens (instead of mustard) and kale instead of spinach. These recipes are really good for gardeners in that they use BUCKETS of greens (since it cooks down to nothing) and you can fool around a lot with the proportion of mustard/radish and spinach/kale. And it comes out SO FLAVORFUL, even if it doesn`t look very appealing. I was amazed that my greens-phobic spouse wanted to lick the pot last time I made this. (a hand blender, BTW, is a really good thing for this recipe). This isn`t my recipe but it looks similar and lots of things can be substituted (instead of gram or corn meal, you can use chickpea or cassava flour, for example).
https://www.thespruceeats.com/sarson-ka-saag-1957985
 
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smoothies: chop with a knife then add in and blend, 20% by volume mixed in with fruits and other stuff isn't detectable

"creamy" soup:  fry onion and garlic in the botom of a soup pot, add in pumpkin (or squash), kale and soup stock, boil untill the pumpkin is soft.  Blend smooth, ad salt/pepper to taste

I would second the egg recipies too
 
gardener
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Egg rolls. Not sure if there is an actual recipe. As I recall the kale was sauteed with onions, garlic & a little oyster sauce first. Then shitake mushrooms & carrots added prior to wrapping the rolls. Deep fried in peanut oil.
 
gardener & bricolagier
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I agree with Tereza Okava about the saag. I start with a palak panir recipe, and run from there, it's basically spiced creamed spinach.  I have yet to meet any green I couldn't hide in there, including some of the hottest landrace arugula you ever met, and excess basil. Palak Panir
 
Jan White
pollinator
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You guys eat lots of eggs don't you, Nicole? Quiche (crustless for quicker prep) and frittatas can hide a lot of greens.
 
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Two of my favorite uses for greens:

1. In a saucepan, briefly saute greens with a lot of minced fresh ginger in oil (I like red palm oil (Dende) for this) add cubed sweet potato or plantain, and one can coconut milk.  Simmer until the coconut milk is almost absorbed.

2. Make a white sauce and add shredded cheddar cheese (like for Mac and cheese) In a big pan, heat oil or butter with a whole clove or two of garlic. Add dry slices of bread broken into pieces.  Once bread is toasted, add greens and saute until just wilted. Combine bread, greens, and sauce in a baking dish and bake as a casserole.
 
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We make this recipe quite often with the dinosaur kale that I like to grow.  Really good combination of flavors - including bacon!  Have to make sure you massage the kale well to break it down.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/melissa-darabian/kale-slaw-recipe-1923604
 
Posts: 61
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
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David Huang wrote:Similar to your kale chips I've been making kale crackers, a thicker heartier version that uses many more greens.  While I haven't yet used nasturtiums or radish leaves in them I've used many other types of edible leaves with no failures yet.  I just recently did a blog about them:  https://theartisthomestead.com/a-stupendously-healthy-snack-cracker/

I'll be using your cracker post for inspiration when my kale gets bigger! I'm sure they're delicious as well as astoundingly healthy. Thank-you! :)

 
Posts: 39
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I like to saute my home grown Cavolo Nero (kale) or spinach with garlic and heaps of butter. I use it as a side with just about anything but mostly with my bacon and eggs for breakfast :)
 
Posts: 89
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I love kale.  It's one of my favorite vegetables.  Cooked kale is more digestible than raw.  Cook it in a little salted water - about 1/2", until tender.  Squeeze it out a bit and add a good portion of butter.  Top with pepper vinegar.

Another favorite is to cook as above, drain and squeeze out extra water.  Add cream to pan and bring to a boil for a few minutes to thicken.  Add a pinch of nutmeg and return kale to pan to heat.

Bonnie
 
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