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Mallard duck plumage color genetics

 
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Years back, I ran across this awesome info graphic from Splendid Toad Art Farm. Their site seems to be closed now, and infographic isn't even visible through wayback machine (https://web.archive.org/web/20150224161313/http://splendidtoad.com/ancona-ducks/ancona-duck-color-gen/). BUT, I found it on pinterest and recreated the full size infographic because it is so very easy to understand and helpful!
duck-color-genetics.jpg
[Thumbnail for duck-color-genetics.jpg]
 
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My head is spinning! I prefer to think that, despite color, if it walks like a duck and talks like a duck, it's a duck. It may explain why one of my Cayugas (black ducks) is turning white as she gets older though. (Well, she's only 2 years old now but started turning white late last year). Could be she has two extended black alleles combined with the white spot pattern genes. I suspected as much!
 
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Head spinning is right! Sooo.... I've got a Muscovy sitting on Mallard (or as we call them "Noisy ducks") eggs which are a cross of a White female and a Khaki Campbell male. Anyone want to suggest what may show up in a couple of weeks assuming the atypical weather hasn't killed all the eggs - we've had a *lot* of trouble this year. If I assume that the "chocolate" gene corresponds to the khaki colour, that would give my males 2 chocolate alleles and since females only have a spot for one chocolate allele, that suggests they'll all end up brown? But how would the mom influence this?  Assuming a white duck is what they're calling "silver", the moms started out with two blues and a black.

As my husband would say, "It's a gene splicing experiment - what will be will be!"
 
Nicole Alderman
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I THINK that khaki Campbell are actually what is called buff "grey". The wild colors of a duck are "grey" and they can be made lighter or darker. I THINK that's controlled by different genes than the chocolate/black/blue/lavender.

There was a thread on Backyard Chicken Keepers about it a whole bunch of the mallard genes. I'll see if I can find it!
 
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