Win a copy of Bioshelter Market Garden this week in the Market Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Dan Boone
  • Carla Burke
  • Kate Downham

Tomato issues

 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Problems with Indigo Rose tomatoes this go around.  I planted them in a row that has never had tomatoes.  I built a UV plastic cover over the section of the garden to protect them from the tropical downpours - as I live in the mountains of Costa Rica.  I put composted manure with magnesium sulfate (3T / gallon of liquid compost) on them every 2 weeks - which normally works wonders.  

But some of them are blotchy - red with green blotches, ripening irregularly (some), and the larger ones tend to split at the stem end.  

I thought maybe I was watering them too much so now I'm only turning on the drip tape once a week.  Maybe give them more magnesium?  Now putting on maybe 2-3 cups of the mix every 2 weeks.

Wondering if you have any ideas for this lone wanderer in foreign lands.


 
master steward
Posts: 4705
Location: Missoula, MT US Hardy:5a Annual Precipitation: 15" Wind:4.2mph Temperature:18-87F
1775
transportation forest garden tiny house books urban greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm not sure if there is anything wrong. I'm growing tomatoes for the first time, too, and to me, it appears that is kind of how fruits ripen- starting off as one color (usually green) and then slowly changing color to different color.
 
gardener
Posts: 6348
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1085
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hau Golda,

If your tomatoes are splitting at the  stem end, you are giving them too much water. I would recommend you try adding some potassium and potash along with trace minerals instead of magnesium sulfate (sulfates yield sulfuric acid, changing the soil pH).

Most of the time tomatoes will ripen in a blotchy manner, especially if they are being given too much water and their nutrients aren't balanced.
Try adding some mycorrhizae to the plant roots too, that will attract the right bacteria and help balance the nutrients for you.

Redhawk

Our tomatoes have gotten so much water this year that we are preparing to rip the plants up and start a new batch.
We have averaged 12 inches of rain per month since January this year and several 7 inch days as well as the normal rains.
It has caused many vegetable growers here to abandon the initial plantings and start new crop plantings to try as salvage the season (for us it is May thu November).

Redhawk
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6348
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1085
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This has so far been a weird year but I have the feeling we need to get adjusted fast because it is likely to simply be the new normal.

Tomatoes are indeed a strange fruit to grow because you can get splitting from too  much or too little water. We have been growing them in straw bales for the  last 5 years and this is the first time for the troubles.
Is it possible for you to use a raised bed for yours? That might be at least part of the answer, to allow for better drainage of water away quickly but still have enough available for the plants when they need it.

The best things about bale growing are compost after two growing seasons with a lot of it already conditioning the soil below and they hold enough water to last for 5 days of 100 degree heat and 85% humidity (our normal summer conditions, at least that used to be the conditions), now that the warming of the planet has gotten to noticeable on the skin levels, things are changing rapidly here.

I'm going to run a trial on a mango tree from seed, since our winters have almost stopped having sub 40's temps I might be able to grow one and only need a cover for the winter weather should we get any.

Good luck with the tomatoes.

Redhawk

 
if you think brussel sprouts are yummy, you should try any other food. And this tiny ad:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!