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Pics from Greg's Forest Garden

 
master gardener
Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
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My son had some mushroom hunter friends over to walk our 12 acres.  I took them for a quick walk around orientation and then left them to their hunting.  They didn't do too badly....came back with some lobster mushrooms (it is Maine after all!) and chanterelles.  While walking them around I got excited because for the first time I have paw paw fruits developing!  I took some pictures and thought I'd share.  I posted some monarch butterfly pictures I took on my milkweed crop here, so I'll skip reposting those.  So first my cute little paw paw fruits.



my-first-paw-paws-ever-are-expanding.jpg
first paw paws pushing fruit
first paw paws pushing fruit
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
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Not far from those paw paws is an old German fig I bought off an older collector that had to reduce the size of his collection.  It's in a pot that got stranded late last fall out in that section of garden with about 20 others.  They hadn't gone dormant yet due to a hot weird fall and then a sudden freeze and heavy snow hit.  I laid them down on the ground and threw two tarps over them, which was all they got for winter protection, which is no where near enough for most figs.  16 died, 6 partially died, but have rebounded, and this one from Germany had no damage!!!  Not even to the dormant fig buds which then pushed these figs out for me.  More cold hardiness testing to follow.

cold-hardy-german-fig-that-stayed-out-all-winter.jpg
german fig that overwintered in Maine
german fig that overwintered in Maine
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
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My sweet cicely is covered in seeds if anyone needs some (just send a PM).  Here are some of them surrounding an apple tree.  (sorry about the pic quality on some of these...was a lot of dew out and I somehow got a drop of water on my lens and didn't notice for a bit)
sweet-cicely-seeds-aroung-the-apple-tree.jpg
sweet cicely seed heads
sweet cicely seed heads
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
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Location: Maine, zone 5
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Fuki is trying to take over the honey berries growing between a cherry, an autumn olive, a juneberry and a walnut.  I'm actively keeping those fuki plants in check.  I do think they're a beautiful edible, but they are very expansive.

fuki-trying-to-take-over-the-honeyberries-between-the-walnut-cherry-and-autumn-olive.jpg
fuki and honeyberries
fuki and honeyberries
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
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Here are some unripe schisandra berries growing up another autumn olive.
schisandra-berries-climbing-an-autumn-olive.jpg
schisandras climbing autumn olive
schisandras climbing autumn olive
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
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Speaking of unripe berries....looks like there will be a bumper crop of elderberries ripening in August.  I picked up Alicia's book to help me figure out what to do with them all!

elderberry-with-unripe-berries.jpg
elderberries coming on
elderberries coming on
elderberry-with-unripe-berries-2.jpg
more elderberries
more elderberries
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
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Location: Maine, zone 5
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When my goumi was smaller the birds used to get almost all the fruit, but now that it's larger and with so many other berries ripening at the same time I can get all I want.  Here it is after eating from it for weeks....still pretty loaded.  And this plant is mostly in the shade under 60' tall trees.

goumi-kicking-out-berries.jpg
goumi pumping out berries
goumi pumping out berries
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
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Here are some purple flowering raspberries growing in the shade under another apple tree.
bee-working-the-purple-flowered-raspberries.jpg
purple flowered raspberries with bee
purple flowered raspberries with bee
purple-flowering-raspberry.jpg
purple flowered raspberries
purple flowered raspberries
 
Greg Martin
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Location: Maine, zone 5
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Heading back into the house I saw this moth that I didn't recognize.  Anyone have any idea what species it is?
mystery-moth.jpg
mystery moth
mystery moth
 
Posts: 7644
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Greg Martin wrote:Heading back into the house I saw this moth that I didn't recognize.  Anyone have any idea what species it is?



It is a Clymene moth...quite striking
https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Haploa-clymene

Wonderful to see all of your photos...fruitful!

 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
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Thank you Judith!  I wonder if it's drawn in by my peach trees?  It looks so elegant.  Almost like it has an evening gown on :)
 
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Dang Greg great thread and thanks for sharing all those pictures! I'm not familiar with Goumi berries, are they good eating fresh or are they better put into jams/preserves like currants?
 
Greg Martin
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Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
815
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Hi James, goumi are related to autumn olives.  They have larger berries and ripen earlier, but have a somewhat similar taste.  They need to be fully ripe or they have a bit of a drying effect on the mouth.  I eat them fresh by the handful.  This weekend we had two nieces and a nephew over and they all adored the fruit.  The nicest thing about the bush is how easy it is to care for.  No issues of any kind and they have walnut sized nitrogen fixing nodules on their roots that give them a great leg up.  It's growing in bright shade in dry sandy soil at the northern edge of the clearing under a forest edge.  I haven't tried cooking with them, but today as I was eating them I was thinking they'd probably be great juiced and in a drink.  I make fruit leather with autumn olive and I suspect that goumi leather would be quite good too.  Probably would make a nice jam too.  My bush is about 8' tall and 10' wide and is completely filled with berries.  I planted a bunch more around my Chinese chestnut trees to help give those a growth rate boost.
 
Posts: 464
Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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I just planted a paw paw I ordered from a mail order catalog. How old is yours before it started bearing?
 
Greg Martin
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Posts: 1911
Location: Maine, zone 5
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I planted it 8 years ago.  I'm a bit surprised it took that long as it's a grafted tree, but Maine is kind of close to its northern limit, so perhaps it takes longer up here.  It flowered for the first time last year, but no fruit.  Can't wait for them to ripen.  I'm the only one in my family or neighborhood to have ever eaten them before so I can't wait to share.
 
Burl Smith
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Thanks. Did you plant more than one? I probably need to obtain another.

Steve Oh wrote:Plant several trees.  Pawpaws do not produce much (if any) fruit from self-pollination,

 
gardener
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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Looks great Greg!

I like the Fuki plant, looking for something like that that will spread.

Those are cool raspberries too!
 
gardener
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What a wonderful garden! Wish mine looked as good!
 
Greg Martin
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Burl Smith wrote:Thanks. Did you plant more than one? I probably need to obtain another.

Steve Oh wrote:Plant several trees.  Pawpaws do not produce much (if any) fruit from self-pollination,



Burl, I planted 3 in that clump and 2 of them were flowering this year.  I have a bunch more I planted 2 years ago, so hopefully the fruiting will get out of control!
 
pollinator
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beautiful, you got my dream garden.
 
pollinator
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Greg Martin wrote:More cold hardiness testing to follow.



It is Maine, lol  :)

Great pictures - your plants look wonderful!
 
Greg Martin
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I'm a serial zone pusher Phil.  I've picked up over 100 varieties of figs to zone screen...a few, like this one, seem to have some promise! :)  Maybe next I'll post some pictures of my citrus hybrid seedlings that survived this past winter.  Too early on any of my zone pushing breeding experiments to claim any real success, but if nothing else it's that little something extra that helps keep me looking forward to every garden season.  It's like very slow motion fun.
 
Greg Martin
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bernetta putnam wrote:beautiful, you got my dream garden.



Thank you Bernetta!  Just keep planting and you'll put mine to shame
 
Greg Martin
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My peaches are ripening now so it's now a race to eat as many as possible!!!  The tree is full sized and covered in fruit.
20190817_101619.jpg
peaches ripening
peaches ripening
 
Greg Martin
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I picked a nice bowl full this morning.
20190817_101349.jpg
bowl of peaches
bowl of peaches
 
Greg Martin
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And got cooking and eating (peach crisps and peach amaretto upside down cakes).
20190817_161926.jpg
peach crisps and amaretto upside down cakes
peach crisps and amaretto upside down cakes
 
Greg Martin
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I will have to cut the elderberry at one of my path heads back as it's really growing over it.  Should have lots of cuttings available for grabs.

The elderberry is to the right (with a peach almond hybrid behind it and a flowering quince in front of it neither of which you can see in this angle), there's a Chinese chestnut to the back end of the path, a cornelian cherry to the left side of the path with beach roses setting lots of hips in front of it.  Under the cornelian cherry as edging on the path are garlic chives and sage that you can make out.  (I should really take a video as there is a lot more packed in around all these guys)
20190817_160907.jpg
path head into forest garden
path head into forest garden
 
Greg Martin
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Here's a close up of the garlic chive and sage path edge.
20190817_101934.jpg
garlic chive and sage path edge
garlic chive and sage path edge
 
Greg Martin
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And an ornamental onion with great tasting foliage that grows at the base of my rose arbor....not sure, I think it might be an A. nutans.  Anyone know?  I'll have to look it up.  The flowers are a little more purple in person than they are showing in this pic.
20190817_101724.jpg
Allium nutans or a hybrid perhaps?
Allium nutans or a hybrid perhaps?
 
Greg Martin
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The elderberries are starting to ripen....probably another week or so, which is good as it gives me time to focus on the pile of peaches.  I notice the birds are watching them ripen closely too!

20190817_160933.jpg
elderberries starting to ripen
elderberries starting to ripen
 
Greg Martin
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This young blueberry needed a bit of help standing up this year.  Hopefully it will strengthen up nicely for future heavy crops.
20190817_160529.jpg
young blueberry temporarily supported to hold up fruit load
young blueberry temporarily supported to hold up fruit load
 
Greg Martin
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Some grapes that escaped into a chestnut when I wasn't looking.
20190817_155716.jpg
grapes climbing chestnut
grapes climbing chestnut
 
Greg Martin
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Some unripe cornelian cherries
20190817_160740.jpg
unripe cornelian cherries
unripe cornelian cherries
 
Greg Martin
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Another cornelian cherry with unripe fruit....these are not too far off from the good stage for brining them into "olives".  This variety is called 'Yellow' and is shaped like an olive....even the seed.

You can't see it in this picture, but there's a tomato growing by it's base that decided to climb up into this tree....plants are pretty industrious!
20190817_161012.jpg
cornelian cherries forming
cornelian cherries forming
 
Greg Martin
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Here's a shot of a beach rose showing off it's lovely hips!  All my beach roses are from the seeds of fruit I gathered over the years from plants on the Maine coast that impressed me with their fruit.  So far mine haven't but they're relatively young plants still building themselves and are nicer every year.  I adore the smell of their blossoms so I have a decent number of them.
20190817_161002.jpg
beach roses
beach roses
 
Greg Martin
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One of my garden paths has become paved with a nice ground cover of which I have no idea how it got there.  I'm pretty sure it's bugleweed (aka Ajuga).  It takes mowing nicely as well as light foot traffic.  It's actually starting to cover another path as well.  I like the way it looks and the fact that I no longer have to apply woodchips where it's taken over.  I'm working on a few other living mulches which are nowhere near as nice while this one just volunteered for the job....go figure.
20190817_155613.jpg
path with Ajuga ground cover
path with Ajuga ground cover
 
Greg Martin
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Japanese ginger (Mioga) is a lovely plant, seen here with some garlic shooting scapes and a very young persimmon tree.
20190817_155153.jpg
Mioga
Mioga
 
Greg Martin
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One of my native spikenard plants (Aralia) is well over my head this year....it really likes the forest garden.  Here's a picture of the unripe fruit.  It will ripen to brown and taste like root beer.  I always look forward to eating those berries.  So do the birds including the wild turkeys.  I have yet to try the spring shoots....on the to try list (so many wonders yet to experience).

20190817_102438.jpg
American spikenard fruit forming
American spikenard fruit forming
 
Greg Martin
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Lingonberry plant starting to fruit for me for the first time.
20190817_102218.jpg
lingonberries
lingonberries
 
Greg Martin
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Fruit forming on one of my potted citrus hybrid parents that I use for my cold hardy citrus breeding efforts.
20190817_101759.jpg
potted hardy citrus hybrid
potted hardy citrus hybrid
 
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