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Zach's Road to Freedom

 
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To my Permies Community,

   As my journal begins to be filled I now endeavor to share some of my most beloved memories of the past few months. In starting this thread I seek to provide an openly honest deep dive into my journey; how I got here, what I believe my purpose is here and  my vision of the future as it is in the moment. I shall slowly peel back the layers of my experience. I've never been one to share my thoughts and feelings on social media ,nevertheless, my spirit is urging me to account my journey, thus far, with this unique community.
  I have now been here at WheatonLabs for 45 days and on the "Road to Freedom" for 79 days. Ever since leaving my cozy abode in Smithtown my life has taken on a whole new purpose. Being physically homeless for a period of time truly taught me that home is where the heart is at. It also solidified my vision of a new earth which shall serve as my compass and guiding light towards permaculture paradise....true liberation. At a very young age, through my sincere yearning for truth and freedom, I began piecing together this peculiar reality I found myself in. Sifting through the many distractions took a few years but fortunate was I to have no better side kick and "partner in crime" than my older sister Taylor who just so happened to have the pieces I was missing and I the same for her. Our journey reemerged upon her return from DC and ever since then we've been magnets for truth during these ever so significant times of paradigm shifting back to the center of the Earth/Heart where permaculture is the anthem and freedom the infinite beat. A fresh perspective and mental clarity was now pulsating within, directed without looking for no clout just preparing for the coming drought when the water wont be coming out if the municipal spout.
   The initial rejection of my vision of the future by my closest community stroked my fire bringing forth an inferno of act-ion. Pachamama was calling to me and I answered my mothers call to learn her ways to usher in a new collective community of abundance. It began in my own backyard after having spent the whole of winter glued to the forums,  youtube and books. From computer to my mind to pen to paper to action, my life began to change rapidly...accelerated succession. The word permaculture was now stuck in my head, I was "infected" and   I then sought with every breath to do the same to others, little did I know the weight of the tremendous programs that ran my communities' slumbering potential. I looked around, untethered to "society" and realized with real eyes real lies. Down went my spade into Mama to cleanse her of pasts chemical drama. Up went a new layer of leaf mulch, worm castings, compost(my new obsession), and any and all organic matter around my neighborhood to give shape to the lasagna style back to eden foundation for my backyard food for-rest. Just as the explorers mistook the natives ancient food forests as a lack of civilization so too did my dear parents bare witness to the "grave sites" now filling up their neatly groomed landscape. It was clear as day that I needed to set sail on a new journey. There Taylor was again, my best friend and most loyal companion who was willing to uproot her whole life, school, job and friends to journey with me towards true freedom, paradise was found inside and it was now time to manifest. Thus began our month long trek on the "Road to Freedom", the highway to the stars, we were now on a mission.
     Instead of planning our exact route we took a more spontaneous approach and just winged it and boy did it pay off. Following our intuition presented us with many mysteries and unexpected adventures along the way. From the peculiar Gothic Cathedral way out of place in Garden City, the pictographs beneath the Ohio Water Fall, the picturesque architecture in underpopulated Cleveland and how can we ever forget our first view of the twinkling stars so bright at the dark sky parks. The sacred Sioux water fall was also very lovely and refreshing as were the many PB&J sandwiches. The many enlightening songs we listened too and videos we watched will never be forgotten. Arriving in the big sky state was bitter sweet as our road trip had ended however we knew that this was the beginning of something even grander. The feeling when we first arrived is still ever so present within me and I doubt I will ever forget the blissful butterflies seeming within for the rest of my life.
   The PDC was getting started and we arrived when Jocelyn was preparing lunch so we began walking around exploring Base Camp and looking for Paul. Down in the Prius comes Jocelyn and we were greeted ever so warmly with a deep sense of welcoming comfort as all of my nervousness evaporated away. I was then assured that is a community based on common unity. As the first week went on Taylor and I began our bootcamp adventure with the honor of working alongside our new companions Fred and Jaqi , oh have we shared a few laughs together, we make everything fun. Construction on the wofati was my first task as we sang Akuna Matata with a drill and level in hand. I had the bountiful experience of being apart of the PDC and finally making friends with like-minded people who truly want to see change in this world. Those were the best conversations of my life and those many connections will forever be in my heart. My first encounter with Wild man Cass had me knowing we were going to be best buds, I didnt think I would ever meet someone more excited about permaculture than me.  To meet Alan, a man with such a stupendous breadth of wisdom was quite the experience. The many enlightening conversations will forever be cherished, not to mention his shared love of Qigong. This for sure set the tone of surprises waiting around the corner. Going to Missoula, my ideal city, the first weekend was a wonderful experience. I got a nice pair of moccasins that I've now sown three times and a singing bowl at a Tibetan shop owned by a lady named Na'wan who guided us to the Tibetan solstice festival at the 1001 Buddhas that just so happened to be that same day. That was the second time a Tibetan shop just came to me. A highlight of the first week was definitely working in the smoothly operating kitchen as Jocelyn taught me some recipes and we cooked for the PDC students. I even got to sit in on lectures about Herbalism and seed saving. After the first week it was apparent as ever that this was the life I was craving, from the willow feeders, the shower shack, riding in the back of Doug(he's been through some shit) to community living I double down and am all in! Tent living up on the volcano provided for some marvelous star gazing and photo ops with Jupiter just to the right I could reach out and touch him. Waking up to the misty dew rolling through the mountains still to this day evokes a mystical vibe that enlivens my rising as I take my first grounding step of the day. As the PDC came to a close the community energy was so high I didn't want anyone to leave. The talent show was the icing on the cake, I've never laughed so hard in my life . (Im laughing as I write this)  Wheaton labs began feeling like home. The amount of things I learned in just the first 2 weeks is absolutely amazing, it would be impossible to recount. I think driving the tractor to allerton abbey and just bearing witness to and being apart of a rising community are the highest of the highlights of the first 2 weeks.  
    Although saying goodbye to the PDC community was difficult the next week started off on a great note with the arrival of some of the ATC students and Paul's tour where he displayed one of his talents of making me non-stop laugh. Seeing ant village really inspired and motivated me to gain the knowledge and experience to one day build my own home sourced directly from Mama. Soon arrived Uncle Mud who needs no introduction and his companion Handyman Rodney.  Through his many stories during our hot springs trip Uncle mud taught me a lot about cobbing, natural building, and gave me many ideas to pursue one day. During the ATC the vibe definitely changed as there was less structure and more free flowing lessons and tinkering here, there and everywhere. It gave me a very unique opportunity to gain various skills each and everyday by giving a hand to whoever needed help. I also got to know the shop pretty good after cleaning it everyday to make sure the students had an organized experience. I love the saying, a clean space makes a clean mind. I learned how to properly chop wood, Prior to that I was going against the grain and wondering how anyone did this. I also helped erect a fragment of the junk pole fence to keep out the wild turkeys. Although power tools and heavy fossil fuel machinery arent in my vision of the future I did acquire skills in that arena in case I see them as a tool worth using during the start of my homestead. Maybe by that time free energy mechanics will have reentered our consciousness. The ATC definitely provided me with some insight as to what appropriate technology is and having that experience was priceless. The highlight of the fourth week was hands down learning to cob and applying it to the wofati, thats what I call an invaluable skill that I one day hope to apply. This week is when my natural building dreams began to uprise. I find myself being drawn to the native style dwellings such as wigwams, long houses and teepees and am in love with the idea of sourcing all my materials directly from the land without any inputs. That is my dream and I know it will take time and a whole lot of skill building but I am confident I will get there. Maybe a debris hut will be a good start? I shall see.
  The next week the bootcamp expanded with my good friends Jen and Josiah joining the squad making the days seem shorter and moments more memorable. I had a lot of ideas come through early in the week as I began taking more time to reflect and evaluate where I am at in my journey and what I need to do to progress. Clarity was not yet completely clear but pieces were beginning to fall into place. I started taking more time to read some books such as How to Know Higher Words and Steiner's Agriculture lectures which help me connect to my higher mind. I also started reading The Resilient Farm and Homestead which Cass gave me. The intensiveness of the labor took off this week as we started to prepare the cob ingredients, mix and apply in rotation. I can feel myself exponentially growing. Excitement is truly pulsing through me. This was also the first week I began cooking for myself and getting a feel for how the bootcamp actually is without an event going on, a new sense of freedom and responsibility was definitely felt. I also started experimenting with a more raw diet as I believe that is whats best for my body. I can say for certainty that I have a lot more energy and I am no longer hungry during working hours. Josiah has been teaching me some cooking skills and showed me how to sprout lentils and beans so I've been eating a lot more living food. Some call it the "electric diet". I always had the intention of eating all raw foods and its seemingly happened in a natural steady progression without even having to try.
   I got some exciting news from home that my three sisters hugel started bearing some golden zucchini that my younger sister Kylie harvested. She also gave me FaceTime updates on my berry bushes:blackberry, red currant, elderberry, Wineberry(wild translated), as well as the hardy kiwi and fruit trees I planted. Some of the trees had to be relocated during the demolition of the "grave sites" so the mulberry didn't survive but the Italian blue plum is doing very well as are the Fuji, Red Delicious and Granny Smith Apples. The potatoes snd other root crops are also being harvested after the New Moon. My potted persimmon and loquat are also doing wonderfully as well as Taylors white pine. Before we left Taylor and I also went around our property and found a bunch of baby maple trees that we potted to be planted when we stop home. The goal was to grow more trees that the tree cutters cannot cut down, I was getting annoyed having to yell every time they tried. I did find an easy solution, park in front of the trees.:) I miss my birch and sycamore,  I had the intention of tapping them but I couldn't seem to do it with a knife without having to lick it off the bark so I was going to buy the kit. I also really miss my secret neighborhood trail to the Nissequogue River where me and Taylor called home for a period of time....until we got swept up by the rain, it is named the river of mud, I wonder how the coons are doing.
  Most if not all of that week was spent at the wofati cobbing, we made a lot of progress....teamwork makes the dreamwork. I can now envision Jen living in it over the winter! The week drew to a close with me picking the new British boot, Fred, up from the airport. The next morning Jocelyn, Fred and I went to the market and I got my sisters some gifts and myself some cottonwood bud salve and a piece of labradorite. I also found a rather large Saskatoon bush that was just waiting to be harvested, there was too many to pick. This post i getting really long so I'll leave it there for now. I intend to post every week going forward and share stories and pictures here and there.
  The journey continues as I collect more pieces to the puzzle of life as I conclude my writing this day in the red cabin, my new dwelling for now. I value and take each and every experience as growth no natter what and with that mindset I find fulfillment in all my actions. To all who resonate with my journey or just find what I have to say interesting I shall keep updated through this thread. Until next time, may we all find common unity.

~Zach Simone


 
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Grounded
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Rising view
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Cathedral
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Cobbing
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Home garden
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Kylie with Golden Zucchini
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Whorf!
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Sewing mocs for third time
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Mulch ringed black locust
 
Posts: 68
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Really big hugs from Auntie MamaBear in Virginia!
 
pollinator
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Wow, Zach, what an awesome read.   Thanks for taking the time to let us in on some of your story!  Looking forward to future insights and pics.
 
Zach Simone
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So much appreciation being sent to you Barbara I couldnt possibly thank you enough for your encourage and wise advice along the way. Thanks Kerry glad you enjoyed it, stay tuned for more posts. I love that I have such an amazing community here on Permies to share my experiences and thoughts with:))  im new to this whole social media thing but Im finding it a great mode of expression. My inner photographer is starting to appear.
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Barbara Martin
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Zach, you (and any sidekick) always have a spot to be here on the east coast, even if you are "just passin' through." Cheers!
 
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So lifted brother! Thanks for sharing your heart with us it’s really appreciated
 
pollinator
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Good stuff Zach. Seeing this reminds me I still need to do the write up I am planning for my PDC experience. I will get to it eventually, as I do want to share my experience.

I wanted to specifically address this part of your post.

Zach Simone wrote: Although power tools and heavy fossil fuel machinery arent in my vision of the future I did acquire skills in that arena in case I see them as a tool worth using during the start of my homestead



Something to consider when looking at tools, is what doing it by hand will take vs using a machine to do it. For example, if you want to terrace a hill. You could do it with hand tools, but it would take years of hard labor. While if you rent an excavator the terraces could be doing their job after just a few days or weeks. So if you think about the machinery as cutting out the years of supporting the labor, you would likely have a lower carbon foot print using the machine.

Similarly with other machines. That said, sometimes the cost wont be worth it. But other times it will. I am of a similar mind as you, I would love to have things more eco friendly and more done without using machines. There is a lot of good that comes from hand work, slowing down and truly feeling things out. You get a lot better feel of wood for example when working with hand tools than power tools. So even if machines make things faster, they might not be the best choice. But sometimes the help of the machine can really be the right choice. Learning when and where it is right is something our culture is not good at, yet. but We can hope.
 
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One of the best writers I know. So expressive and able to create vidid imagery for the reader. Love you , forever and always. <3
 
Zach Simone
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Thanks Cass and Taylor! Our journey has just begun and Im so grateful to be on it with you two.
Great insight Devin I totally agree and innerstand the necessity of using whats available during these times. An example of this is our cellular devices, yes they are practical in the present for sharing knoledge and communicating but long term their purpose begins to dwindle with the expansion of consciousness and with that technology...I certainly consider earthworks built overnight regeneraive and sustainable. My intention goes far into the future and I know fossil fuels will continue to be used by the military and average American for the next few years so during this small window of time where oil is still available, may all of us visionaries have at it.
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Zach Simone
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 Off the beaten path I wander, hopeful and ecstatic for what is to come as I climb the mountain to freedom. Taylor, Cass and I ventured to an opulent, mesmerizingly magical lake today. The pure, clean, glistening water cleansed our bodies as we cheered for the coming dawn. The path to the lake provided us with a marvelous glimpse into the splendor that mother nature seeds. The abundant polyculture of thimbles, elderberries, hyssop, sage, fireweed,  cow parsnip, mountain ash, pines, cedars, cinquefoil, black eyed susan, nine-bark, and a ground cover of white dutch clover flourished at the cliffs edge. It was truly an edenic paradise right in the foothills of Montana. We took some plants from Mama to burn and give offerings of humble gratitude to her. This was for sure the highlight of my week, if not month. My higher self was definitely needing a flight into nature. The energy was flowing up into my soles through my crown as I connected and surrendered to the flow and will of our natural environment. The ancestors call us to reestablish dominion over our temple through the Heart/Earth as our intent radiates our every action. Its time for free energy. We shall pick up where Tesla left off, the information and skills are now obtainable. Stream of higher consciousness unveils thoughts not thought. Stay tuned...:)
   Poetry has been found as my creative expression in these times away from my family and friends. Solace and warmth flow through my being when I express my innermost faculties. Gone are the days when they lay slumbering within. I am here for a purpose and my voice has to be heard. This is my vision of the future and how I, personally, perceive this world we find ourselves in...this os my truth. I want to emphasize that all I seek in writing this is to express myself to the highest degree. I will post one of my poems one of these days, they are deep, I am a very deep person. Previous experiences have taught me not to care how others will perceive my work because in doing so I hold myself back from my highest potential manifesting. Of course this will not resonate with most but that doesn't stop me from sharing my knowledge and gnosis, with an open mind and heart we can access the inner sun.
    I shall now continue recounting my time here at Wheaton Labs. As of recent most of my bootcamp time has been more wofati work. I mowed some hay for the finish cob and then sifted it twice. Cob...cob...cob was the unending motto. I also put some wool in the window cracks to further insulate the walls. I've also been doing a lot of white washing with lime, salt and water. Fred and I took a trip to Superior to get some lumber and the creek to fill up the fire truck, Judy, to water the berms during the month drought. Water has finally replenished thirsty Montana and when it rains it RAINS....Varuna! The days have become very routine. I have a new love for harvesting dandelion greens and making a delicious peanut sauce. I've been doing a lot of research on fall gardening during my free time so if anyone has any good resources on the such it would be greatly appreciated. I want to order Four Season Harvest by Elliot Coleman. I recently sowed some fall plants such as kale, spinach, winter squash, brassicas, radish, turnip and some nitrogen fixing peas all around the berms. We've also been planting lots of garlic and walking onion. I also started some of the seeds I brought from home for my family if I decide to stop home. Arugula, Tahitian Squash, Connecticut Field Pumpkin, lettuce, kale and leek.
    My whole purpose in diving into permaculture is to be able to grow my own light, elemental food and be completely sustainable and self reliant thus untethering myself from this destructive, parasitic slave/master society, (money is the master). Also, the final economic crash where cryto money becomes the world currency is right around the corner.  Phonetically speaking, work is war with a K and K is Karma. K is the el-even-th letter in the encoded alpha-bet. Through an understanding of etymology a lot can be revealed...language is a key to our liberation. Unfortunately our current english language is (a)engle-ish and the words we speak dont hold the same vibration as what we refer to. (sanskirt&hebrew)This is certainly not how it always was back during the time of the ancestors' unified civilization where a common cross-cultural spiritual way of living elevated every aspect of society. In the center of each community was a wondrous free energy  (electromagnetism) structure with water below which stored the energy in quartz crystals just like our computer crystals. And even more mind-blowing, each structure was on an earth vein and connected to all the others around the planet....a worldwide free energy grid!!! You wont hear that in textbooks. Plasma fed fruit trees, an idea Ive been diving into. Humbled am I to my core to have received this information. *If anyone is interested in learning any of this stuff I can PM sources.*
  This way of living nowadays is very unnatural to us humans and it has only been this way for a far shorter time than the penguin, quackery history tells us, yay for the internet!! (The cat is out of the bag) Community based living with each member playing a vital role that benefits the whole was the way of life our ancestors lived for far longer than this nonsensical feudal system of scarcity with the banking cartel bloodline parasites as the "lords". The problem is most people, even in the "woke" community, do not have an innerstanding of their true history, which we only have a fraction of,  leaving them disconnected to their roots. It was unfortunately rewritten by jesuit monks around the time of the scientific revolution and who knows how many times prior. Thus lay dormant in some, subconscious parasitic programs of scarcity. Liberation comes when knowledge of self is reestablished. This has become rather difficult in this "modern" era as we are surrounded by many unnatural frequencies that mess with our vital or etheric body not to mention the N P K food. However, the wave that is coming in now is so very powerful and uplifting it simply cannot be ignored and brushed off as fringe like what happened in the 60s. This time WILL, in my opinion, be different. We are here to uproot this paradigm and return humanity back to its roots just as the elders prophesied long ago.
 Back to my recountance. (Yes I make up words and cannot give a damn about SAT quackery grammar, I did score perfectly on that though)  Friday's I've been helping Cass with the pavilion outside the FPH. I collected a lot of sand and went rock hunting for flat ones. I envision a tranquil community gathering area with edible and medicinal vines crawling up the overhang and meeting in the middle where they shade the area below....So much potential... there could also be an above area needing a ladder where more edibles are grown, just an idea. I have learned so very much in the almost two months of being here and I value this experience so much. Although I haven't been learning exactly what I wanted to, these experiences are invaluable and couldn't have been found elsewhere. I am eternally grateful for the kindness and generosity that Paul and Jocelyn have provided in opening their land to be a community.
 I recently moved onto the lab beside Taylor and Cass and have been camping it up. I have yet to officially pick a plot but I am scoping out options seeing what could work. With a key from Fred, the gate has been opened to begin pondering the labs potential. We now have a full bootcamp with the arrival of my new friends Dave and Austin. It has been a pleasure to work with Dave who is so kind and easy-going. Austin arrived last night during the monsoon and I anticipate we'll be getting along very well.  I look forward to the experiences yet had as I continue climbing the mountain on the road to freedom.

LOKAH SAMASTAH SUKHINO BHAVANTU


         
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Paradise
 
Zach Simone
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Some more pictures
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Anyone know what these are?
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Thimble
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Elderberry
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Shroom
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White wash
 
master pollinator
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Nice report (if I may call it that)!

It is encouraging to hear things are going well, but I am especially encouraged to hear and see the work being done on the WOFATI again. I kind of have a soft spot in my heart for that kind of building, and it has saddened me that the building had kind of lingered in limbo these last few months. The work you, and others, have done looks great!

Keep us informed! You write so well!
 
Travis Johnson
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Devin Lavign wrote:Something to consider when looking at tools, is what doing it by hand will take vs using a machine to do it. For example, if you want to terrace a hill. You could do it with hand tools, but it would take years of hard labor. While if you rent an excavator the terraces could be doing their job after just a few days or weeks. So if you think about the machinery as cutting out the years of supporting the labor, you would likely have a lower carbon foot print using the machine.

Similarly with other machines. That said, sometimes the cost wont be worth it. But other times it will. I am of a similar mind as you, I would love to have things more eco friendly and more done without using machines. There is a lot of good that comes from hand work, slowing down and truly feeling things out. You get a lot better feel of wood for example when working with hand tools than power tools. So even if machines make things faster, they might not be the best choice. But sometimes the help of the machine can really be the right choice. Learning when and where it is right is something our culture is not good at, yet. but We can hope.



I love machines too, but the mistake I often see people make, is having too big of a machine. R.G. Letourneau is known to have said, "There are no big jobs, just small machine", but I do not agree. I have always had a love of doing colossal work with small machines.

Around here we have people known as "Kubota Farmers", because they will have 5 acres and a 85 HP tractor. I have nothing against tractors, but it seems the scale is way off. I have hundreds of acres, and yet all I have is a 25 HP tractor, and that is all I will ever have. It is all I need.

Like you Devin, I feel the ability to get things done with machines makes their use justified, but a smaller machine can do that. Not only is it affordable, being constantly available means it can do work constantly. I once had to move 350 cubic yards of gravel 1/2 mile, but I did it with a 1 cubic yard dump trailer. I just realized, if I made 10 loads per day, in 35 days I would have moved 350 cubic yards, and that is just what I did!

But to that end, and once thing few people think about, is how practical a 2 wheel tractor is. I have one, a BCS model, and the amount of attachments is amazing. In fact I compared a small Kubota Tractor haying set up to a BCS, and the tractor set-up would cost a homesteader $27,000 where as the BCS Moel was only $9000. Both produce hay to feed animals!
 
Zach Simone
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Great points Travis, I love the ideas. I will certainly have to look more into using machines efficiently for when I start developement on my future permaculture projects.
 
Barbara Martin
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Glad for your update, Zach! As you go along your life's way, consider using your extraordinary writing talent as a means to provide for yourself. There's a reason you have that gift. Hugs!
 
Cass Hazel
Posts: 40
Location: Saskatoon Saskatchewan, Canada (Zone 3)
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Your heart sings for the world you envision
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Zach Simone
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So honored to be on this journey with you brother Cass. That touched my heart Barbara, Im definetly going to explore some writing oppurtunities.
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Sprouts!
 
Travis Johnson
master pollinator
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Zach Simone wrote:Great points Travis, I love the ideas. I will certainly have to look more into using machines efficiently for when I start developement on my future permaculture projects.



I think using machines or not is a personal choice. I grew up on a tractor and even neighbors note how much I get done despite its small size. I should say however, that if I need a big machine, I will use them, I just rent them to keep my ownership costs down).

I do love our BSC 2 wheel tractor, and really wish more homesteaders would consider them. They are really powerful machines, with a ton of implements that can be used with them. I feel it is a nice way to save a mans back from hard toil, yet not be expensive to own, operate, or consume gobs of fuel. I would post more on them, but my dad has my BCS 2 Wheel Tractor because I always have the bigger farm tractor here. If I ever get that tractor back, I could fabricate a ton of implements for it. But for now its my father's baby...

He is my father you know? He loves it and it is his baby...
 
master steward
Posts: 28338
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
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Machines help us do more, but experience less.
 
pollinator
Posts: 778
Location: Chicago/San Francisco
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> Machines help us do more, but experience less.

Yes. But.

It depends... Weigh on one scale the value of getting lots accomplished in a few years  vs. on the other scale,  getting some things accomplished over a life time.

Both are legitimate positions to take, right?

Weigh using available technology while it's available  vs.  incarnating right now a more holistic value system which may bring to life a more holistic culture on a larger scale.

I don't see any slam-dunk choices here.


Rufus
 
Zach Simone
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  As I sit on the train heading East home now nears. The time has come for me to return to finish what I started. My adventure at Wheaton Labs has drawn to a close. I feel as though its purpose has been served on my road to freedom. Infinite possibilities now await as I gather the pieces collected and turn them into experienced wisdom. The final 20 hour stretch shall provide me with the means for a more than adequate farewell message to Montana and a unifying re-call to my homeland. Sacred tones radiate within as I feel the center expand as I near reunification, with every breathe. to my beloved ones.  https://soundcloud.com/rodrigovaz/johann-sebastian-bach-pachelbels-cannon-in-d-major
  The last few days at the lab were spent finishing up the wofati work. I helped move the first part of the deck, sifted more sand, mowed some hay, sorted the manure and dug out some of the floor with a pick axe to make room for the cob floor. Although I enjoyed working on the wofati Im still unsure as to how it was benefiting and evolving the community,as a whole, towards regenerative sustainability. That was mine and Taylors initial observation week 1. We were truly seeking to direct our energy towards moving the community forward towards freedom but other lessons were assuredly presented. I wish my time spent at basecamp could've been spent on setting up food, water and energy systems but I suppose there are other priorities and a time and place for everything. Once those are complete I believe that energy will radiate outward to the lab and it can begin to become a permaculture hub. I have faith! The latter part of the week Taylor, Cass snd I decided these would be our last days in Montana so I started to gather my belongings and clean the red cabin and take down the tent. Although I didn't learn exactly what I came there to learn, I walk away with invaluable experiences that facilitated bountiful growth. Being at Wheaton Labs also gave me the space I needed to reflect and meditate on how my family and I can move forward into the New Paradigm together forever. I endeavor to show my eternal gratitude towards this once in a lifetime opportunity and am sending only positivity for I know success and abundance is right around the corner for the WLC. Before hitting the road we stopped at the Sage Wall Megalith to honor our ancestors, set our intention into stone and receive ancestral "downloads". The retreat was very refreshing and rejuvenating and it was a pleasure to meet Julie Ryder and hear all of her surreal stories. She truly is the modern day Indiana Jones. (MontanaMegaliths.com)!
  Infinite positive possibility now fills my being as I remember why I came to Montana. East to West reveals my quest of mystical interest, I wrote in December. Into dense materiality I journeyed to provide the space and time needed to receive my highest potential. A profound power has arisen within through this purging process as I saw what no longer could be, the smoke and mirrors were only distractions. My integrity remains brighter than ever for I would never sacrifice what rings true inside. I treat others how I want to be treated as all of my actions shall reflect back onto myself. Like a pebble dropped in water my intention radiates outward projecting my vision unto the physical manifestation of collective abundance. The jewel in the lotus is blossoming!
https://soundcloud.com/jasonmraz/living-in-the-moment
  As I ground this in I want to state my intention in returning home. I intend to bring common unity to Long Island through the reconnection to sustainable, communal living which then physically frees us all. My family is the first and foremost reason for me returning, I live for them and all of my actions are filled with divine love which elevates us fourfold. We are one, we are already this. My experience at Wheaton Labs has taught me what works and what doesnt work in community living and community projects, from my perspective. For success and abundance to manifest physically collective purpose must be present through the Spirit and Nature...that which connects us all. I've learned that heart centered intention must always be the guiding force in manifesting a dream. If an intention veers away from the center the magnetism dwindles and the law of attraction projects idealisms and stagnation results. I seek to swim in free flowing water. We will all learn to live as one and all of the illusions will come undone. In the meantime I will continue to share my love and healing with the Earth.
    I intend to evolve the backyard food forest, maybe get some chickens, more rabbits and begin working with my family, together and unified to free ourselves physically from all societal constraints. After this is done I shall radiate outward and begin to develop my community food forest at the nature center in the center of my neighborhood. I also see potential in land upstate or Canada where we could begin growing all of our food and also lay the re-foundation of the family business...we are the North Star Erectors moving from Iron to Gold:). I will also be seeking out permaculture and biomagnetic healing apprenticeships in the near future and I reckon that some are already waiting for me.
 It is our time to unite and illuminate because we were made to shine...divinity is in all of our DNA.  This little light of mine Im gonna let it shine shine shine. With this light I can change the world! That is my dream and so it shall be, free free free!
https://soundcloud.com/luminaries/free-energy

   
 
 
 
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Wyoming
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Last Montana sunset
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Helena Cathedral
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Bye Wofati
 
Barbara Martin
Posts: 68
Location: Southside of Virginia
14
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Super Auntie MamaBear hugs !!!
 
Doody calls. I would really rather that it didn't. Comfort me wise and sterile tiny ad:
A rocket mass heater heats your home with one tenth the wood of a conventional wood stove
http://woodheat.net
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