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Cassie Langstraat
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Oh my! I am drooling over that. What is all in the rice herb veg concoction?
 
Leila Rich
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Cassie Langstraat wrote:
Leila Rich wrote:Japanese-ish salmon: really rare salmon on a kind of rice, herb and veg salad
What is all in the rice herb veg concoction?
broad beans, garlic chives, asparagus, mint, daikon radish, home-pickled ginger and juice, sesame seeds, soy sauce, sesame oil...
It's different every time
Versions go well with silken tofu, eggs, other fish-or it's good on its own.
 
Cj Sloane
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Bacon wrapped meatloaf - I think I've posted that before but this has a new twist - my own beef, pork, and lamb. Yummo.
 
Landon Sunrich
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I am so amazed by Red Kuri squash. I've grown it a few times now. Great deep orange flesh. Tons of seeds. I'm saving 40 seeds each from a few of the best lookers and roasting the rest with some tamari and sesame oil. Right. Dinner tonight: It was spectacular. Baked Curry Red Kuri fish stew.

I cut the top off the squash leaving enough to form a lid. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds. Rinse and save the pulp from the seeds, toss lightly in oil and seasoning and roast at low temperature 35+- minutes.

Layer seasonings including two to four table spoons brown sugar, half a large onion juliened, two medium stalks diced celery, one small parsnip and one 'finger' celeriac diced.A shake of soy sauce and sesame oil. One fillet of pollock or tilapi on top with onions and a two tea spoons of curry past. Cover with stem top 'lid' and bake for one hour at 325, reduce heat to 200 and back for 45 more minutes. Stir by scraping in squash bowls sides. Top with roasted seeds and enjoy.

Seriously, it's really tasty.

And the amount of food in one squash! It's pretty astounding. Red Kuri. Awesome Squash.
 
Susan Doyon
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we had venison steak cooked in a little bacon fat venison shot today from our property ( hunter is our neighbor, he has free run of the farm with some other hunters and provides some from each dear he bags )
Argonaut squash ( from our seed but grown by a friend ) roasted with onions and cranberries and tossed with baby spinach when almost done , and beets from our garden

still learning to cook venison hubby likes steaks I prefer pot roast . this batch was from today I am wondering if it is better if it ages a few days , taste was wonderful
Sue
 
Leila Rich
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'Tis the season for...globe artichokes. Yay!
Amazing things: I planted a 'pup' from a big plant in August, and it's now a towering monster covered in buds

Couscous with asparagus, broad beans, green olives, boiled egg, artichoke hearts, pickled lemon, parsley
 
Judith Browning
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Leila, I want to come eat at your house! is that asparagus and an olive in the bowl also? and maybe quinoa? EDIT...now I see the caption below the picture.
All we had for supper was eggs with rosemary and oregano and shiitakes with homemade humus, again
 
Leila Rich
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Judith Browning wrote:All we had for supper was eggs with rosemary and oregano and shiitakes with homemade humus, again
Oh woe, not more shitake!
Tis a tragedy, this life of ours
I've just finished a very ascetic dinner of sprouts, leaves and hummus on toast-
to wash down all the lovely organic hoppy local beer...
 
Leila Rich
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I've decided if I eat fish, it will be cheap, abundant 'bycatch' species.
I fried up a whole mullet last night till the tail was crispy enough to eat (because that's the best bit!)
I soaked up the oily fish pan goodness with boiled potatoes, dandelion greens, broccoli and Florence fennel flowers.

Today I made the skeleton into stock and made fish stew by addinga bottled tomatoes, potato, leaf celery, asparagus and herbs

I had enough fish soup left over for tomorrow-that's three meals from a $6 fish
 
Leila Rich
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Appropriate that my last post was about cheap, abundant fish...
During the holidays we caught about 15 kahawai in a half-hour fishing frenzy-
when they're 'running', you basically can't just catch one!
If we had a vote for a NZ national fish, kahawai would get mine.
There was a big crowd to feed and we ate lots fresh (it makes very good sashimi)
the rest I smoked and froze.

Tonight I made a salady thing with smoked kahawai,
potatoes, beans, zucchini, sorrel, dandelion greens, sprouts and herbs,
olive oil and my wine vinegar.
I'm feeling a bit smug as I made, caught or grew nearly everything

Oh, and a nice organic pilsner

*Edit* More smugness
I just had dessert: red currants, blackberries, boysenberries, wild stawberries and a plum-
I threatened my four-year old plum tree with a jolly good grafting,
and it duly produced a small crop of lovely fruit.

 
Marie van Houtte
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Leila! You are making me dribble. What have you been eating lately?
 
Leila Rich
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Marie van Houtte wrote:Leila! You are making me dribble. What have you been eating lately?
Pretty much everything I can lay my hands on!
I was going to make fritters, but I got too lazy and just made a giant 'fritterta'
Corn, zucchini, dandelion greens, feta, loads of oregano, pickled lemon and chives in a fritter batter
With a salad of French sorrel, black cherry tomatoes, grapes and avocado.
 
W.T. Wilmont
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moose roast in the crock pot and veggies from last summers garden
 
Leila Rich
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Took apart another whole mullet, and made stock while frying up the fillets.
Had a fillet with potatoes fried in the fishy pan
and a massive salad of lacto-fermented beets,
olives, dandelion greens, cherry tomatoes, carrot...
 
Adrien Lapointe
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Some ham curing for Easter!

The brine contains so many things I cannot remember all of them: sweet apple cider, homemade hard apple cider, maple sap, maple syrup, juniper berries, clover, bay leaves, sea salt, and a few other things I forget. One thing that is not in there is nitrite. I followed the recipe from The River Cottage Smoking and Curing Handbook (which is an awesome book on traditional curing).

I'll try to remember to post pictures of the end result.
ham.JPG
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cider cured ham
 
Julia Winter
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Oh wow! That's going to be awesome. I hope you can smoke it!
 
Adrien Lapointe
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The recipe calls for cold smoking, which I might not be able to achieve
 
Adrien Lapointe
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So, the ham turned out fantastic. Nothing like ham you would buy at the store (even the organic stuff). Here is a picture before we baked it. Unfortunately, we were so eager to eat it that we did not take a picture of the finished product. I put some maple syrup and mustard as the glaze. This was the best ham I have had.

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Oh, that is SO awesome, Adrien! I'll have to try the maple syrup and mustard.

We had a fig-ginger-lemon sauce (figs were frozen whole, cooked in the crockpot with fresh ginger, quartered lemon, raisins and a dash of red wine, too) for pork roast this week. It was a bit chutney-esque I guess.
 
Adrien Lapointe
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Hmmm! That sounds good! The original recipe called for honey and mustard as the glaze, but really any sweet glaze would have worked.

According to Steven Lamb (the author of the Smoking and Curing Handbook), once brined and cold smoked, the ham will keep for a few months in the cold. That is another awesome way to preserve fall slaughtered meat without a freezer and it is faster than making prosciutto.
 
John Master
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Moroccan lamb stew, taters and beets. Never done it before and hoping its a winner.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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John Master wrote:Moroccan lamb stew, taters and beets. Never done it before and hoping its a winner.


Sounds excellent. How'd it turn out? Any pics?
 
Cj Sloane
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Finally ground up some lamb that was harvested last fall for some heavily spiced Moroccan Merguez sausage. I've been meaning to try this for a long time! Really good. This was from some really mild flavored mutton. If you had any questionable culls (really old ewes or rams), this would be a great way to use up that meat.
 
Dawn Hoff
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Arroz con chorizo (iberico) - I was tired,
It is easy
 
David Barmon
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I would just like to highlight that Gravy can be an important part of any dinner. In addition to being some pretty amazing comfort food in the evening gravy can also be enjoyed at breakfast and lunch! Not to mention the home defense applications!!! Here is a little video I made with my son Zach, talking all about gravy! I'm not sure where gravy would go in a zones/sectors permaculture plan but I'm pretty sure its in there somewhere.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWUHqrpmCzY
 
Cassie Langstraat
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I've embedded david's video.. And FULLY endorse it.. It's HILARIOUS.


 
Cj Sloane
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New found Black Morels with eggs & goat cheese.
 
Vera Stewart
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Supper plan for a hot early July day -

Water
or chamomile ice tea.
Free-range burger patties on
toasted (slightly stale) whole-wheat buns
with random fresh herbs from the yard (green onion, basil, cilantro?)
(and possibility for store bought condiments rescued from small community picnic)

plus corn on the cob

and local blueberries with left over from a party ice cream

Quick question if I may - I've saved up some chicken bones, and plan to make a chicken stock - which I've never done before, but it certainly seems simple - wondering if it's possible to use vegetable peelings/left over bits in the stock as well? Will they provide anything?


 
Ann Torrence
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Vera Stewart wrote:

Quick question if I may - I've saved up some chicken bones, and plan to make a chicken stock - which I've never done before, but it certainly seems simple - wondering if it's possible to use vegetable peelings/left over bits in the stock as well? Will they provide anything?


Yes and yes! Go light on the celery, it can overwhelm quickly, and peppers can make it bitter. Otherwise it's all fair game, even onion skins. Also parmesan rinds and apple cores add some richness. I save stuff like that in the freezer until I have a couple gallon bags full. In fact, I need to make some today from the necks and backs from our last chicken harvest, been putting it off but it's just getting hotter and has to be done.
 
Vera Stewart
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Thank-you. I'll start up my own veggie scrap bag in the freezer just as soon as I get some room in there!
 
Ann Torrence
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6+ qts in the frig cooling. It's too hot to can them up tonight. Gave the new puppy a couple of the cooked gonads for a snack, put hair on his chest (not that he needs it). That was one of the few chicken parts we weren't using and he wolfed them down. Thanks Vera for he nudge to get that stuff out of the fridge and on its way to culinary nectar. The puppy thanks you too.
 
Vera Stewart
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You're welcome. I always like it when I make other people work.

I made my first batch of chicken stock over the weekend - it was darker then I expected it to be, and there was some sediment on the bottom (even after straining it three times) but it tasted fine, so I used some and froze some.

I also cut up and froze some local cherries. I was caught at this work, and am now expected to make cherry pie!
 
Cj Sloane
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95% of dinner was produced on our property! Bear's Tooth mushroom, Pork Chops, Cucumbers & Dill. Very low carb.

The mushroom reminded us of lobster, in both taste and texture. It was wild but ironically my husband spent several hours last week inoculated logs with Bears Tooth.

Oddly, I had to used store bought eggs. The chickens keep hiding them and turning them into baby chicks.

 
Anthony Dale
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Lately, I'm on a healthy food kinda page. I cook all of the food I eat and I try to implement the vegetables from my small garden. I have lots of eggplants this year and I'm already out of recipes to cook them. I think I'll can some for winter.
Anyways, here's one of the best eggplant recipest I've come across. This is a light meal with lots of flavour, no meat and it smells heavenly. It's pretty quick to make too.
 
John Master
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made a potato/broth/cheese/beef/bacon soup, it was incredible! I used some cream and milk to get it extra thick.

Ingredients
1 lb ground beef
2 T butter
¾ cup onion, chopped
¾ cup carrots, shredded
¾ cup celery, diced
1 t dried basil
1 t parsley flakes
3 cups chicken broth
4 T hydrolyzed gelatin, if not using Homemade Broth (search "Homemade Broth" on my site for my recipe)
4 cups Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced
2 cups white cheddar cheese, shredded
1 cup milk
½ cup heavy cream
¾ t sea salt
¼ t pepper
1–2 T arrowroot powder (optional thickener)
1 lb bacon, cooked and crumbled
¼ cup sour cream


Instructions
1.Brown beef in a large sauté pan. Drain and set aside.
2.In a large pot, cook butter, onion, carrots, celery, basil and parsley over medium heat until tender.
3.Add broth, gelatin, potatoes and beef. Bring to a boil then reduce heat, cover and simmer 12–15 minutes.
4.Stir in the cheese, milk, cream, salt and pepper.
5.If desired, sprinkle 1–2 tablespoons of arrowroot powder over top to thicken, mixing well.
6.Stir in bacon and sour cream and serve.

 
Burra Maluca
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My other half brought these in from the garden yesterday, and declared that they were for HIM to cook dinner with. 



So today he cooked them.

The English have a dish called Shepherd's Pie, traditionally to use up the left-overs from roast lamb.

The Portuguese have Roupa Velha, which means Old Clothes, to use up left-over bacalhau.

And now, we have Baldrick's Trousers, to use up as many turnips as possible.



He can't wait any longer to get that turnipy feast onto his plate.

C'mon - you were a batman waiter, doesn't that mean I get first dibs on it?



So that's turnips sauted with onions and bacon, smothered with mushy peas, topped with more turnips.  Baldrick would be proud.



Served with red cabbage sauted with onions, garlic and a dash of piri piri.



I might let him cook for me again! 

 
Cj Sloane
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This dinner was from the end of September, but I forgot all about this thread.

Looks like it's going to be a locally source dinner tonight! 2 pounds Shrimp of the Woods and an unlucky wild turkey who flew into the cow/sheep paddock. Not sure what happened but there was a big commotion and Sirius (the dog) came out with it.

Plus some hard cider with all locally sourced ingredients: Vermont apples, blueberries and maple syrup. I've got a new batch of cider brewing but it won't be ready for a few months.

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Maureen Atsali
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Eh... I read through this thread, and now feel very down about my dinner - which is so typically dull.  Cabbage, potatoes and brown rice.  Might throw a fried egg in with that.  I wish my food were a little less basic and a little more fun.

CJ - I was born and raised in Vermont... boy I miss the local foods!
 
Cj Sloane
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What do the locals eat? Or maybe a better question, what did they eat 100 years ago?
 
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