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My Experience Eating Nothing From Plants, aka Zero Carb  RSS feed

 
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nancy sutton wrote:Interesting topic.  I just ran across this interview of Jordan Peterson by Joe Rogan (I don't necessarily agree with either of their opinions in other arenas, however).
There is also another interview available with his daughter, Mikhaila.  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLF29w6YqXs



It is interesting, isn't it Nancy?  It is so backwards to everything we think we know, it takes a while to wrap one's head around it.

As for the Petersons, those two are relative newcomers to this way of eating but I am sooooo glad that they decided to try it and are sharing their experiences. Their experience is that of most folks who give this way of eating an honest 30 day try.  It tends to bring about profound positive change. Their stories are both ones of amazing healing and growth, as is mine and many, many others.

Here's Mikhaila's blog:

http://mikhailapeterson.com/about-me/

And here are a whole lot more testimonials, from ex-vegans to powerlifters to people laid low by lifelong chronic illness, all finding their health:

https://meatheals.com/

If you are out there and wondering how to get well, or better, or reach your best, this is worth a 30 day try.  I guarantee you will learn an immense amount about yourself that will help you going forward.
 
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As I understand it, eating nothing but meat is good and helps some people that have problems with their digestive system, in the same way some people are allergic to nuts or strawberries or you name it, but this doesn’t mean this particular foods are harmful for the general population, in the same way eating only meat cant work with people prone to gout disease.
The negative side of eating only meat will be the gut flora and the high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides mainly.
Every food will be first digested in the small intestines where there are no that much bacteria, but then in the large intestine the effect of bacteria on what is left will be very strong, if you eat mainly meat you will start to breed bacteria that are good at digesting meat, because what type of bacteria you will have there is pretty much a simple result of natural selection based on the type of food you eat. Now why this may be a problem?
Well just think about the difference between a carrion and a rotting vegetation, most types of rotting vegetation don’t provoke such negative reactions in humans because the bacteria there feeding on these plant materials have the enzymes that are good for exactly that, digesting plant materials, this cant harm animals that much, while with carrion the bacteria there are good at digesting flesh, and we are made out of flesh, so these bacteria are good at harming you.
When you eat meat it is good to eat lots of vegetables with that, like green leafy stuff, so that you will encourage the good bacteria to take over and to suppress the carrion bacteria to take over, which may irritate your large intestine and may cause cancer in some people that are prone to that.
I guess people are indeed different and some may not get such problems indeed, but how are one to know for sure about these things. Also leafs and other vegetables are hardly a carbohydrate, you cant reach the energy in there like cows and goats, but you can get the vitamins and the minerals, so not eating even that looks strange to me, one should have some really bad medical condition to have the excuse to avoid that.
 
pollinator
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Roy Hinkley wrote:I've had something of a change of heart recently.
I had an audiobook, How Not to Die.  I'm not going to preach here but it's convinced me to try and make vegan work.

He has a website - actual results from scientific studies ... before the results get sanitized for public consumption. This is truly the best "food as medicine" resource I've ever found.
https://nutritionfacts.org/



I have seen so many posts and videos of ex-vegans who said it ruined their health, that I would be very cautious. Scientific studies go into all directions anyway! I prefer to cross those informations with anthropology, and most people have been close to 50 - 50 % animal and plant food. When doing an elimination diet, it is possible to re-introduce for some people, when the digestive and immune system get better, thus also the nervous system allowing rest & digest. This is called HORMESIS. We need some challenge, but not too much. You can blow a candle, but the wind will reinforce a wild fire! So, it is had true that "what does not kill us reinforces us", because what does not kill us can damage and weaken us too!

Then about eating greens with the meat... some people have success with high protein diet because it seems that they can have a liver problem that is overwhelmed by vitamine A. In that case liver and eggs will not be welcome in the diet.... and most dairies either!
 
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Roy Hinkley wrote:I've had something of a change of heart recently.
I had an audiobook, How Not to Die.  I'm not going to preach here but it's convinced me to try and make vegan work.

He has a website - actual results from scientific studies ... before the results get sanitized for public consumption. This is truly the best "food as medicine" resource I've ever found.
https://nutritionfacts.org/



I stumbled across Dr. Greger about two months ago. I started by reading Michael Pollan some years ago and then dug deeper into nutrition, also watching documentaries like Forks over Knives and similar. I think they are really convincing, with lots of testimonials. Then you come across other diets like low carb / paleo / keto etc. And they also have convincing testimonials.

So is there more than one truth?

Yes, I would say so.

There is no One Nutrition Fits All. There is also genetics and lifestyle.
For example, my grandparents and their siblings. Very long-living, around 100 years. They ate traditional German food, some meat, but not too much. Mostly local and regional veggies and fruit. Fermented food (sauerkraut, yoghurt, kombucha), sourdough bread, linseeds. They did not exclude anything. But they cooked every single meal from scratch. They had an active lifestyle, did most errands on foot, drank only water (and coffee and very little alcohol). They had no overweight, no allergies or chronic diseases (although one grandmother had Diabetes the last years of her life). In some members (maternal side) there were extreme levels of colesterol but it had no harmful influence on their cardiovascular system.

My husband's family from Argentina: Lots of meat and refined carbs (white bread, pasta, pastry). Cardiovascular diseases, cancer. I have never met his grandparents as they were already dead when I met my husband so I can't say anything about their lifestyle. My FIL died from cancer, my MIL is currently struggling with cancer. Did they just have bad luck with their genetics, or did their nutrition and lifestyle not match their genetics very well?

I think everybody has to find out which nutrition suits them. In the meantime, I stick to some rules that seem plausible to me:
Maintain an active lifestyle. Eat lots of regional and seasonal fruits and vegetables. Buy ethical meat only (and eggs from my own chickens). Buy raw milk. Consume fermented food regularly (kimchi, yoghurt, kefir). Include cruciferous vegetables and pulses in your diet. As little sugar as possible. Only drink water (we never buy any soda).

Apart from that, I am still trying to find out the best diet for me as I have some problems with bloating. I know I can't go totally whole-grain, I can't tolerate much from the cole family in one go and even have to have an eye on all garlic/onion/leeks etc, carrots, corn, bell peppers and much more. But luckily those are minor problems, I feel well and don't have any weight problems (never had).

 
Xisca Nicolas
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I- ZC being mostly useful to people with auto-immune disorders - including crohn or UC ; psoriasis and arthritis - I suggest reading this:
https://ggenereux.blog/2016/04/22/ending-the-mystery-of-auto-immune/

The success of ZC can also come from getting rid of excess Vit A, if eggs and butter are excluded. Greens are by far the richest source of Vit A. People who have eaten enriched food could be concerned most.
Grant is not on ZC at all but meat and rice and a sort of bean that has less vitA. Of course if you eat only the beef, you get the same benefit as him, so it depends if the person has intolerance to carbs or not, in addition to a problem with vitA. This is worth checking! VitA, if not used by the body, is a burden on the liver.

This forum, that is all about carbs, and more VitA rich liver and oysters than muscle meat, has a serious discussion about this diet, very well explained by the OP, here:
https://raypeatforum.com/community/threads/grant-genereuxs-theory-of-vitamin-a-toxicity.24722/

II-
The state of our digestive system depends on the vagus nerve, and let's say the right balance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. The vagus nerve is the main parasympathetic nerve and its correct activation in "rest & digest" state is needed for the digestive system to work well.

You can also read here about the "cell danger response" or CDR. Whatever attacks the body puts not only the ANS but all cells in defense mode, which take away a lot of our vital energy.
I considere it as a MUST read!

https://chronicillnesstraumastudies.com/cell-danger-response-disease/

By the way...
Veronique Mead has eaten ZC for a few years, and she is now able to increase again her range of eating.... She was a doctor and has then started to study the somatic field of early inrecognized trauma, and she is trained in Somatic Experiencing (SE) which I am also.

SO
If what you eat puts your cells in CDR mode, you will not feel good. And it is personal, though it would be interesting to know more about who can benefit from which diet! How much time for trials we could save....

It is difficult to know what is the problem because our body is so resilient that it takes time to be so bad that we have consequences. But when we reach unhealth, well we know that it takes time for the body to go back to a secure feeling allowing to switch back to a better metabolism. We are all mostly in adaptations to our environment, and to often to a bad environment. The body, when you do better for it, is suspicious for a long time before accepting to change its coping and adaptative ways!

ZC works first by removing triggers. "What does not kill you reinforces you" is not true if you have been damaged as it is close to killing. You are reinforced when you can successfully adapt, this yes. But it needs to be progressive, and it relies on the self-regulation of the 2 branches of the autonomic nervous system - ANS - which is like the movement of a pendulum. The wider the better.

Hormesis is important, triggering some defense to reinforce us. So for those who cannot apply this in their diet, it is needed to apply it in other parts of the life style, like exercise and the correct circadian rythm with light to begin with. Cycling heat and cold is also reinforcing us. But too much of what is an aggression will not reinforce us, we have to take care of what we can through self-feedback and self-respect. We also need to increase exercise, heat, cold, exposure to light, in a titrated way. All this is supportive to and supported by the ANS. We need safety forst and foremost, and then increase stimulation without hurting us. Coherence, homeostasis, regulation according to the surroundings.
 
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Xisca... so much wisdom here!!  Thanks : )
 
Borislav Iliev
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Greens are by far the richest source of Vit A. People who have eaten enriched food could be concerned most.



Plants have carotenoids, which is not vit A, the human body use that to produce vit A as much as needed, you cant harm yourself by consuming too much carotenoids. But consuming too much animal products can give you that overdose, which I think prove something about the evolutionary history of human metabolism.
 
Xisca Nicolas
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Yes carotenoids can also be harmful.
 
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I posted in Roy's thread, but I wanted to add my support and experiences in this thread.  Thanks for starting it, Matt, and for the great videos.

First, I'll say that I agree with Maria that there isn't a single diet that works for all of us.  What I've read is that 10-15% of us are 'carb adapted', so they don't experience the same results with a high carb diet as the rest of the population.  There are also some people who are more sensitive to carbs than the average, so we all have to find what works for us.  I'm T2D and for years I followed the suggestions from my doctor, a diabetes nutritional workshop, the Canadian dietary guidelines (all the same stuff).  I took the meds prescribed and exercised.  All that got me was progressive weight gain and more meds.  I've researched many diets over the years and tried all that seemed legit, so I feel I have a good understanding on how my body works. Here are a few I've tried:

High carb vegetarian - felt shitty and gained more weight, also had a spike in my long-term blood sugar levels
Atkins - I lost weight but my blood sugars didn't improve much.  
Paleo - This worked very well for me and was a huge step to where I am today.  I lost weight, felt great, dropped my BS levels and really cut down on my hunger, which naturally led to:
Intermittent Fasting - This was a natural progression for me.  I've always struggled to eat breakfast but 'it's the most important meal of the day', so I did for years.  Once I switched to paleo I started eating within an 8 hour window, then just ended up eating once a day because that worked best for me.  
Ketogenic - This is where I ended up.  It doesn't require you to eat only once a day, though I do, and it's changed my life.

I came across paleo very early on in the movement, but there weren't any studies that I could find that supported it.  It made sense, but I need more than that because I can be pretty stupid at times.  It wasn't until a few years ago that I came back around to it though several books that cited studies and gave a much more in-depth explanation of why it works.  When I did try it, though, it worked very well for me.  As I said above, I ended up eating just one meal a day even though the suggestions were to eat in an 8 hour window.  This is essentially intermittent fasting for 16 hours a day.  I then found this site which really brought it all together for me.  How our bodies deal with nutrition, how to deal with the underlying issue, not the symptoms, and all backed by a critical analysis of the statistics and studies that support the various schools of thought on diet.  Once I found that site, it was like a revelation.

The guy who runs the site is a kidney doctor who's only about 2 hours away from me.  His patients were mostly morbidly obese diabetics, so he ended up looking into diabetes as it was the disease that drove most of his practice.  He was able to explain the mechanics of diabetes in a way that I found very easy to understand.  Once I understood how my body was acting and reacting to my diet, it gave me the tools to fix the issue.  I was already motivated to make a change as the reason I was researching nutrition and diabetes was because I needed to go on insulin, according to my doctor, and I had zero interest in that or the complications.  So, what does Dr. Fung recommend?  He's a proponent of a Low Carb, High Fat diet.  He also is a proponent of fasting, the ultimate LCHF diet.  I know it sounds extreme, but it doesn't have to be.  Eating only within an 8 hour window give you a 16 hour fast everyday.  This lets your blood sugar drop, which increases insulin sensitivity.  For extreme cases, he often suggests fasting for a day or more.  He's been able to get many of hit patients off insulin and often all other diabetic drugs within a few months.  That was my experience, too.

This is really hard for me to admit, but I was once over 275lbs.  I'm not sure how much over because I couldn't face weighing myself.  I'm 5'6" and, when I was younger, I was at the national level in a couple of sports, so it isn't like I hadn't been healthy before, or didn't know how to train.  Through extreme HIIT and calorie reduction, I was able to drop a fair bit of that weight, but I still stalled at about 225.  I had a specialist comment on how amazing that was, given the weight-gaining effects of the meds I was on.  That got me involved in what I was putting in my body and I ended up dropping most of the meds, to the chagrin of my doctor.  That made it easier to lose or even maintain the weight, but my blood sugar kept rising until we got the insulin stage.  

With that motivation and what I'd learned, I decided to try fasting.  At that time, I was already on the paleo diet, so I was in ketosis, though I didn't really understand that at the time, but it means my body was already adapted to burning fat for fuel, not carbs.  That, and the fact that I only ate once a day, made fasting surprisingly easy for me.  There are a whole host of good things that your body does when fasting, such as an increase in your natural HGH, more energy, and clearer thinking, all of which I experienced.  I would've seen the same results with a keto diet, but not as quickly.  Fasting allowed me to jump-start my weightloss and it's remained an effective tool if I fall off the wagon and need to get back on.  After I lost the weight I needed to lose I switched to a ketogenic diet, which is similar to paleo.  I had a meter that would measure your breath to measure my ketosis, so I used it to test foods that I added back in to my diet.  Dairy is very interesting in that it has sugars but also fat.  The fat offsets the sugars to some extent, though to different degrees in different people.  Some people on paleo or keto avoid dairy, but I found it didn't raise my blood sugar noticeably or kick me out of ketosis, so that's great for me.  My tests were done with raw milk and the cheese I made from it, so I got full fat.  

What I've read about protein has shown me why the Atkins diet didn't work for me.  When you eat fat, it stays as fat.  If you eat too much protein, however, your body can turn some of it into glucose, giving you a blood sugar spike.  I tried this out with my glucose meter and also the keto breath meter and I found, for me, that too much protein didn't work for me.   I also came across other research into protein that supports this and, sadly, also finds a correlation between too much protein and aging/cancer issues.  Personally, I think that just about anything these days can give you cancer, so I don't worry about it too much, but I do think that a moderate protein diet makes the most sense.  That leaves me with fat for calories but, happily, meat has fat.  Meat is around 25% protein, so if I want 60 grams of protein, I need to eat about half a pound of meat a day for a moderate intake.  This is where I differ from what Matt's doing.

In the end, I was able to go from 210 when I started doing extended fasts to 160, in 4 months.  The fasting re-set my hunger signals which made it much easier.  I used to be able to eat about a pound of cheese without feeling full but now I feel full when I've had enough.  I've done several 5-7 day fasts and the longest I've done is 11 days, but you don't need to do that if you aren't in crisis.  I've seen a lot of people who've lost a lot of weight end up with lots of excess, saggy skin.  I lost over 100 lbs without any saggy skin and I think it's because of the fasting.  When you fast, your body scavenges what it needs.  I had lots of fat, so energy wasn't an issue, but my body used the excess skin for protein.  This seems to be typical with fasting.  

Now I typically eat a HFLC diet.  I do eat a lot of veggies and greens, but my low carb allowance is about 25-35 grams of carbs a day.  I don't eat root veggies and you have to watch some things like peppers, but there's an awful lot to eat.  I have huge salads with full fat dressings and/or veggies with my meat.  I don't need any meds for my blood sugar, my colitis is gone, along with a host of other issues, and I feel great.  I do miss grains and I occasionally fall off the wagon or have holiday dinners, but I'm convinced that it's the best for me.  Someone mentioned that it takes 3 days for your body to switch over to burning fat, which it may, but I found it takes me 5 days.  Once you do, though, it's great.  

Thanks to everyone who's contributed here.  I'm always interested in learning more about what works and doesn't for nutrition and I hope everyone here finds something that works for them.  I urge you to check out the site I linked, or take a gander at his books, The Obesity Code and The Diabetes Code.  Dr. Fung is incredibly good at explaining what is happening in our bodies, and that's definitely good to know.
 
Borislav Iliev
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Xisca Nicolas wrote:Yes carotenoids can also be harmful.



Only if taken as supplements, it is imposdible to harm yourself by eating too much plants, while it is possible to overdose yourself by eating animal products.
 
Xisca Nicolas
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Borislav Iliev wrote:

Xisca Nicolas wrote:Yes carotenoids can also be harmful.

Only if taken as supplements, it is imposdible to harm yourself by eating too much plants, while it is possible to overdose yourself by eating animal products.


Nope, not only supps can hurt us!

Yes some people can hurt themselves by eating too much plants. Not everything is safe in nature! Mostly, plants have toxins that are a good stimulus for some persons, but too much of a good stimulus can lead to wreak havoc on the body. Most people know nothing about the toxicity of plants unfortunately. Different people will react to different toxins, like saponin or oxalic acid or salicilic acid....

And caroten seems to act like an inflamatory substance like an excess of omega 6 fats. Carotens are a problem for people with a slow liver and thyroid, and the big quantity of caroten in many plants, and even greens may also lower thyroid according to the thyroid specialist Peat!
“I avoid carotene, because it blocks thyroid and steroid production, and very large, excessive, amounts of vitamin A, retinol, can do the same.”
"Carotene is highly unsaturated and it has the same effect of interfering with thyroid function because of this series of unsaturations."
http://www.functionalps.com/blog/2012/10/08/carotenemia-hypothyroidism/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCOpp8qRl_Q

A nutritionist commenting on the possible usefulness of a 3 months vitA detox diet:
https://butternutrition.com/vitamin-a-detox-diet/


 
Borislav Iliev
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Going by that logic drinking water is also harmful if you drink too much, also breathing oxygen is harmful if you breathe too much, the point is if you eat some normal diet that has all sorts of plants, you should not be worried that you can overdose with carotenoids.
Humans get sick of eating the same thing for too long and thats how nature figured out a way to make us eat diverse diet of many things, you should try intentionally and very hard to include so much carotenoids to get that harmful effect.
It is similar to drinking too much water, you should intentionally make yourself drink too much in order to get that harmful effect.
Carotenoids have nothing to do with the detrimental effect of omega 6, this involves the synthesis of prostaglandins

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Metabolic-pathways-for-omega-6-and-omega-3-fatty-acids-that-result-in-a-variety-of_fig2_275836096

carotenoids actually have anti inflammatory effect

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905192/

 
Timothy Markus
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Borislav Iliev wrote:Going by that logic drinking water is also harmful if you drink too much



Drinking too much water can actually kill someone.  If a person drinks too much while exercising they can enter hyponatremia, which can lead to unconsciousness, epileptic seizures, or even death.  The doctor that first identified the issue with marathon runners was Timothy Noakes, the same guy who defended himself for suggesting a HFLC diet (and won).
 
Borislav Iliev
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^Sure, drinking too much water is not good, my point was under normal conditions a normal human should not be worried how much water he has consumed over the day, a problem can happen only if someone actively make himself consume much more than the needed.
In the same way someone can get too much carotenoids only by taking supplements or by consciously creating a diet too high in carotenoids(with the intention to get exactly that), under normal circumstances you should not worry about it.(like thinking you should exclude carrots from your salad, because you had pumpkin for breakfast or smth.)
 
nancy sutton
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Brace yourselves, meat eaters... global Big Ag is trying to take out meat!!   I hope this is posted a few other places on Permies:

https://www.dietdoctor.com/report-cut-red-meat-eating-by-80-percent-to-save-the-planet?utm_source=Diet+Doctor+newsletter&utm_campaign=d22d5496fb-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_01_23_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_41db911777-d22d5496fb-466571785

Read the links to - the make up of the 'commission'; the soy interests, et al; the environmental value of livestock, etc.  My favorite re: accusations of animal cruelty is that when raised naturally, instead of 'industrially',  they have the best life possible, with the exception of one bad day... actually, only one bad moment, when done right.

And here's Dr. Georgia Ede's (a carnivore) response:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/diagnosis-diet/201901/eat-lancets-plant-based-planet-10-things-you-need-know

I think this may be a positive move.  This huge campaign tells me that healthy folks are a real threat to the (well subsidized by our tax $) sugar, soy, seed oil and grain industries.  Yay!  This sounds like deja vu of the '80's when the sugar industry promoted the 'fat is bad (not sugar)' canard, taking a page from Big Tobacco's playbook.  And how many people unnecessarily died from cardio et al diseases?  (An engaging, non-diet-partisan history of that is 'Death by Food Pyramid' by Denise Minger (sp?).   Also, Taubes' latest 'The Case Against Sugar' details
that deadly campaign, also.  
 
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