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! permie friendly fat bombs

 
pioneer
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permie friendly fat bombs

Fat bombs are handy "snacks" for those of us who chose a high fat diet - low carb diet. The problem is that most of the recipes are full of artificial sweeteners and other unnatural substances. The reason for this is that many people are trying to replace high carb desert foods with low carb desert foods. For those of us who are used to eating real foods, many of these simply do not appeal to our taste. I would like to start a list of fat bombs that a permie can be happy with.
These should ideally have the following attributes.
-very little or no carbohydrates
-easy to transport (for traveling, working, etc.)
-some amount of shelf life (refrigeration is ok)
-easy to eat (no dishes or utensils required)
-made of real food (no food-like substances)

-pemmican
-cream (some container necessary, but has made a great "get me through" when I have to run out the door and won't eat for many hours)
-chesse (I would like to experiment with coating chunks of cheese with seasoned lard)
-Tuna balls (good tuna from cleanish waters are hard to find, most online recipes have rancid gmo soybean oil)

I hope we can work together to build a huge list of non-toxic fat bombs. Please post anything you have. We can experiment with with creating new ones and modifying others to be more natural.
 
pollinator
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Tuna might be a non-starter. I am still looking for the article, but apparently you can do yourself some serious harm if the ratio of protein to fat is too high.

Maybe it would be good to look at higher-fat cheeses. I am guessing that the leaner cheeses are too high in either protein or carbs or both.

It has been common practice in survival kits to include tallow candles, as opposed to paraffin, because tallow, which is rendered beef fat, is shelf-stable and edible. Maybe some seasoned rendered tallow and lard would be a good idea. I could see small, seasoned tallow or lard balls, seasoned with spices chosen for flavour profile and perhaps health benefits, and rolled in a culinary oil seed, like flax or sesame, being edible, and maybe even tasty.

What about avocado? I mean, I don't like it straight, but with a little salt and pepper, I can eat it with a spoon, and I know many who do eat it plain. My personal favourite, admittedly hard to encapsulate for on-the-go snacking, is guac, made of an avocado and an equal amount of homemade salsa.

Good luck, in any case. I think fatty nut-based mixes with minimally sweet dried fruits are a good option for mobility and shelf-stability, and in emergencies, a tub of coconut oil can provide nutrition.

-CK
 
Mother Tree
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The fat in sheep milk is 25% medium chain triglycerides, which apparently break down straight into ketones even if you're not in full nutritional ketosis.

My blood sugars are notoriously unstable and I suffer rather unless I have a supply of either coconut or sheep cheese readily on hand to get me through a wobbly bit. Because let's face it, life happens and I don't keep to my ketogenic diet reliably enough to cope without a bit of back up in the form of MCT rich snacks.  I usually have creamed coconut, melted and then poured into cute little chocolate moulds, stashed in the freezer for instant 'fat bombs', but a more permie solution for me, living where coconuts don't grow but every village has it's own sheep-cheese producer, is to keep a supply of sheep cheese in the fridge.
 
pollinator
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Grass fed beef jerky. Combine with hard rind cheese for upgrade.
Bulletproof coffee stored in mason jar. My favorite uses hickorynuts from the woods near my house, so local, beyond organic, mineral rich, fat.
 
master steward
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Michael Holtman wrote: The reason for this is that many people are trying to replace high carb desert foods with low carb desert foods. For those of us who are used to eating real foods, many of these simply do not appeal to our taste.



I agree with J Davis about the jerky and Bullet Proof Coffee

Eggs are also a great snack food.

Cheese is also good.

Nuts

Any kind of meat is good for snacks.
 
garden master
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Lately I've been enjoying seeds for a snack, like sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds.
 
master pollinator
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I usually skip breakfast but I have a cup of coffee with honey.

I like to put honey on cut-up fruit with a dash of heavy cream.

It's not low carb but I love popcorn cooked with olive oil and sea salt.  (I could eat this every night.)

Somebody mentioned eggs and I second that.  I love a good hardboiled egg.
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Michael Holtman
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Very good thoughts here.

Yes some cheeses do not have enough fat, and a few certainly have to many carbs. I don't think I would want to eat seasoned tallow/lard by itself, but that might work for some. Pemmican might be the closest thing I might snack on.

I had not thought of avocados, and that might be really great for certain individuals. I think it may play an important role as an ingredient in some future experimental recipes.

I have thought a lot about seeds and nuts, but alas, so many carbs. That is fine for me since I don't go all out keto, But I do think of fat bombs as being extremely low carb.

Eggs are going to be a little high in protein, but the yolks are a fine ingredient to consider.

Real jerky has almost no fat content. This is why pemican exists.

I wonder if we could come up with something using tallow/lard, jerky, spices, crumbled egg yolk, and seeds? It might keep well enough in a refrigerator for 3-4 days, but might be more nutrient dense and scrumptious than some other options.

By the way, goats milk also has a lot of medium chain triglycerides! I do like the thing with creamed coconut! That's pretty smart!
 
Anne Miller
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This recipe from Delish looks permie friendly to me:


Ingredients

8 oz.cream cheese, softened to room temperature

1/2 c.keto-friendly peanut butter

1/4 c.coconut oil, plus 2 tbsp.

1/4 tsp.kosher salt

1/2 c.keto-friendly dark chocolate chips (such as Lily's)


Directions

Line a small baking sheet with parchment paper. In a medium bowl, combine cream cheese, peanut butter, ¼ cup coconut oil, and salt. Using a hand mixer, beat mixture until fully combined, about 2 minutes. Place bowl in freezer to firm up slightly, 10 to 15 minutes.

When peanut butter mixture has hardened, use a small cookie scoop or spoon to create tablespoon-sized balls. Place in refrigerator to harden, 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, make chocolate drizzle: combine chocolate chips and remaining coconut oil in a microwave safe bowl and microwave in 30 second intervals until fully melted. Drizzle over peanut butter balls and place back in refrigerator to harden, 5 minutes.

To store, keep covered in refrigerator.


https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a58139/keto-fat-bombs-recipe/


If I made these I would leave off the chocolate chips as I would not be able to find them to buy.

And being a lazy cook, I would go with just the cream cheese mixed with peanut butter and eaten by the spoonfuls.  Using only one container to mix and no need for a microwave.


 
Michael Holtman
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Anne Miller wrote:This recipe from Delish looks permie friendly to me:


Ingredients

8 oz.cream cheese, softened to room temperature

1/2 c.keto-friendly peanut butter

1/4 c.coconut oil, plus 2 tbsp.

1/4 tsp.kosher salt

1/2 c.keto-friendly dark chocolate chips (such as Lily's)



That is a good one, Anne! It is quite bit more deserty, but not in a bad way. I might leave out the chocolate if it were for me. My wife is wanting to experiment with making her own, which may be ok in moderation (it is a stimulant). You're right about he microwave being totally unnecessary. We have gone without one so far without feeling as if we were lacking anything. Altho it  is true that we are somewhat impoverished relative to others so far as daily doses of radiation are concerned. I also totally understand this flavor of laziness. Thanks!
 
pollinator
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I'd venture to suggest utilizing powdered egg yolk.  Now, I personally eat eggs raw from my birds and I don't worry about it.  But for those not okay with the idea of eating a whole raw egg (i.e. whole powdered egg without being cooked), then at least the powdered egg yolk, since over-easy eggs/uncooked yolks are okay with most people.   Powdered egg is fairly shelf-stable and cooked up just like a regular scrambled egg when you add water.  It could be added as as a congealing agent to any kind of no-bake-ball-snack.  Also incorporating powdered leafy greens here.  They're naturally fruity/sweet when you dry them and very high in protein.  
 
Michael Holtman
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That's something that I've not heard of, jen!
How does one go about making powdered raw egg?
 
gardener
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I make them, all the time. I have a sweet tooth, that won't be denied (though how sweet something must be, to satisfy it, has drastically decreased, over the years), so, I use stevia &/or monkfruit, about 90% of the time, sometimes (if there is a textural issue I can't otherwise resolve) with the addition of either xylitol or erythritol, as they are naturally derived sugar alcohols, don't mess with my ketosis, and used minimally, don't upset my digestive system. One example:

Lemon cheesecake bombs:
1 whole lemon (including peel) sliced or chopped, deseeded, pureed
2 8oz pkgs full fat cream cheese, at room temp
1/4lb butter,  at room temp
1t salt
2t vanilla extract
Sweetener (stevia or monkfruit), to taste
Cream together all but lemon, until light and fluffy. Fold in the lemon, spread into an icecube tray or other mold, and freezer, til firm. To serve: allow to thaw, 10 - 15 minutes.

I love the intense lemon flavor a whole lemon provides. Just using the juice just doesn't even come close to this level of satisfying flavor, for me.

 
Anne Miller
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Carla, Lemon cheesecake bombs sounds heavenly!  I am loving everyone's ideas!

The Cauliflower Pizza Crust could be made like cookies and topped with cheese and a pepperoni for Pizza Bites.
 
Michael Holtman
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Carla Burke wrote:... I use stevia &/or monkfruit, about 90% of the time, sometimes ... with the addition of either xylitol or erythritol..



This is exactly the sort of thing I am not looking for. I am fine with a pot full of fatty meat and lots of veggies in a good stock for almost every meal. It is nice to have some things to make for special occasions, but trying to find fat bombs that do not mimic High carb foods is so difficult.

I do like cheesecake, but it is usually far too sweet for my taste. I have looked for sugar free cheese cake recipes, but all of them are sweetened with other things. I have been told the xylitol or something is necessary for the recipe to work at all. I don't want to use xylitol, erythritol, etc. I would much prefer honey, maple syrup, molasses, or even "non-toxic" granulated sugar. Generally, however, I have no desire for sweets.

I would like to know if you have found a source for natural stevia or monk fruit. Does anyone know of a reputable place to order this from??? I have no desire for the additives, etc. in the "extracts", powders, and what-not. I just try to eat foods that are as close to the way God made them as I can.
 
Michael Holtman
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Anne Miller wrote:The Cauliflower Pizza Crust could be made like cookies and topped with cheese and a pepperoni for Pizza Bites.



Not bad idea! Some pork belly and cream cheese would up the fat content! I want to experiment with this one in the coming weeks!
 
Carla Burke
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Both stevia and monkfruit are plants, that you can grow, at home. I'm currently purchasing mine (both organic) from Mountain Rose Herbs, and my monkfruit from Pure Monk. Both are 100% plant matter, the stevia,  comes in a very green, crushed in leaf form. The monkfruit is quite literally, the fruit, dried and powdered.

Both xylitol and erythritol are naturally derived, as well, though they are more processed. If you're using sugar, that is also just as processed as either of them. As to the cheesecake, please note where in the recipe, I specifically said, "to taste". That means, you can make it as sweet or not sweet as you like, you could, if you like, leave it out, entirely, and user the recipe as a savory one, however the lemons are very intense, this way, and even a bit bitter, without something to mellow them. Personally, I don't make it all that sweet, any more - just enough to take the bitter edge off the pitch of the lemon. But, the recipe is very refreshing.

If you're trying to stay in ketosis, honey, maple syrup, and sugar are not your friends.

Edited to add: Speaking as an herbalist, I make extracts, all the time. The only 'additives' in a pure extract, are the liquid used to 'extract' the plants constituents. So, when I make my vanilla extract, I use everclear, good quality bourbon, vodka, brandy, or rum, and vanilla beans. Chemicals are unnecessary.
 
Michael Holtman
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Thank you carla! I guess I will be making lemon cheesecake fat bombs! I might try slightly sweetened, and unsweetened with mint and thyme. I am not trying to get to ketosis, but much of what we eat would be fine for any guests we might have who are going full keto. I consume a very moderate amount of carbs, and honey (or just some fruit) is generally my preferred sweetener since it does not deplete the body's minerals. Do you think we should separate HFLC from keto? Do we need a separate section like we have for paleo?
 
Carla Burke
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No problem, Michael! The lines between HFLC and keto are so fine, I personally don't think so. I think in many ways, it's splitting hairs, though there are differences.

I avoid processed foods as much as possible, but there are some processes, that are pretty much necessary - like the monk fruit, for example. It's a fruit, and needs to be washed and dehydrated, as a means of preservation. Once those two processes are completed, it's then (usually) either powdered, or tinctured - two more processes. So, what we consider 'processed' is a line each of us pretty much needs to determine, for ourselves. I much prefer to avoid high heat processes, if possible, yet even home-canned items typically require either a 'hot water bath' or pressure canning - both are high heat processes. Things that are off limits, for me, are synthetic/toxic chemical processes & synthetic/toxic preservatives/additives - yet, I'll use lye. One of the very few canned foods I even buy, is Thai style, full-fat, canned coconut milk. Since I already know that all my foods are as 'clean' as I can get them, I don't bother writing things like 'organic', 'non-gmo', 'raw', 'homemade', and 'extra virgin' type descriptors, when I write out a recipe. It's extra time I don't bother to take. When I share a recipe, I figure it's up to the person I share it with, to make those decisions for themselves, unless something specific is imperative to the results. Lol,  in fact, I rarely bother to add things like 'low carb', 'paleo', 'vegan' or 'keto' in the title, either, come to think of it.

Here's another one, for you, that I've gotten a bit more specific about ingredients, with:

Creamy Roasted Garlic Dip
1 can Thai style coconut milk, chilled, (solids and liquid separated, liquids aren't needed, & can be saved for something else)
12 oz cream cheese, at room temp
Garlic, roasted*, mashed or pureed (to taste, I sometimes use an entire head, But some folks are happy with a few cloves)
Salt, to taste (I prefer non-iodized sea salt, or Himalayan)

Cream the cream cheese, until light and fluffy, then whip in the coconut milk solids. Stir in the garlic and salt. Chill at least a couple hours, to meld the flavors, and serve with celery, carrots, bell peppers, or whatever you like.




 
Michael Holtman
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Carla Burke wrote:
Creamy Roasted Garlic Dip
1 can Thai style coconut milk, chilled, (solids and liquid separated, liquids aren't needed, & can be saved for something else)
12 oz cream cheese, at room temp
Garlic, roasted*, mashed or pureed (to taste, I sometimes use an entire head, But some folks are happy with a few cloves)
Salt, to taste (I prefer non-iodized sea salt, or Himalayan)

Cream the cream cheese, until light and fluffy, then whip in the coconut milk solids. Stir in the garlic and salt. Chill at least a couple hours, to meld the flavors, and serve with celery, carrots, bell peppers, or whatever you like.



WHAT A GREAT WAY TO FATTEN UP SOME VEGGIES!!! I think this is the BEST fat bomb thus far!!! Thanks Carla!
 
Carla Burke
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Michael Holtman wrote:
WHAT A GREAT WAY TO FATTEN UP SOME VEGGIES!!! I think this is the BEST fat bomb thus far!!! Thanks Carla!



My pleasure!
 
Carla Burke
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Oh! I forgot to add - that recipe can be turned into a sauce, too serve warm, over hot veggies or meat, too. Just use the coconut milk straight from the shelf, instead of chilling it, so it won't separate. Heat it, and add the cream cheese, stirring till smooth, and add the garlic & salt. Spoon over hot veggies, meats. If you play with this formula, you can come up with all kinds of things, both sweet and savory, alike.

 
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