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Sensitive to barometric pressure? What are your symptoms?

 
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We are getting our first real typhoon of the season, and I can feel the pressure dropping.

I can feel it in my sinuses starting to throb and my head feeling like a balloon expanding. It's hard to focus my eyes all the way. I feel foggy, almost high; it takes a bit longer to answer questions much to the frustration of family and co-workers. And so sleepy, I feel like I took an antihistamine. There is an urge to clear my ears, like you would scuba diving.

Taking a decongestant helps.

Every once in a while I take a dive through Google scholar looking for evidence that barometric pressure sensitivity is a thing, not much luck so far. I've never met anyone who has similar symptoms or any doctor who had heard of this sensitivity...

Are you sensitive to barometric pressure changes?

What are your symptoms? How do you treat them?
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Typhoon
Typhoon
 
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I experience issues, but just not like that.

I have had knee surgery and when the barometer falls, my knee aches, but only where they did surgery, which was where they removed some offending cartilage that was scraping along my knee joints. I also feel it in my throat where they removed my Thyroid.

Again, this is much different than what you experience, but I do not think you are crazy at all. In fact I think if longer studies were done, they might connect a few dots on barometer and health.

Myself, I have an inoperertable tumor on my Pitutary Gland that is pressing on my brainstem. Considering that is the epicenter of the brain (energy levels, emotion, and cardiac control), it would be interesting to do a study and see how my body responds in terms of barometeric pressure changes. I say that because my Thyroid (now removed) used to take out the highs and lows of stress, but now that is replaced with medication, but since it is a set amount, as stress in my body rises and falls, I cannot cope in time to the stress I experience. In short, I have good and bad days, so it would be interesting to see if my bad days coincided with certain atmospheric conditions.

But I realize, this is kind of off-topic from what you were hoping to discuss. I do apologize for going semi-off topic.
 
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(not answering your question, but I just heard about the storm coming on the radio. I've lived with hurricanes and tornadoes, but typhoons in Japan were the most mind-blowing storms I have ever seen in real life-- and I lived up north away from the water, where they aren't even all that. Stay safe.)
 
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Hi Amy,

Yes, you are not alone. I often get a nasty sinus headache when a thunderstorm is in the works, or a low pressure system is approaching. Not always, but often enough to at least correlate.

No fun!
 
Amy Arnett
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Travis Johnson wrote:
But I realize, this is kind of off-topic from what you were hoping to discuss. I do apologize for going semi-off topic.



Not at all! Thanks for sharing, Travis. Scar tissue can be extra sensitive and take years to really heal. Pituitary and thyroid effect everything, and pressing on your brain stem! That's gotta make for a vague and frustrating mix of symptoms.
 
Amy Arnett
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Artie Scott wrote:Hi Amy,

Yes, you are not alone. I often get a nasty sinus headache when a thunderstorm is in the works, or a low pressure system is approaching. Not always, but often enough to at least correlate.

No fun!




Thank you! It's funny you mention correlation. I actually tracked my symptoms against weather conditions on an excel spreadsheet for a while.
 
Amy Arnett
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Tereza Okava wrote:(not answering your question, but I just heard about the storm coming on the radio. I've lived with hurricanes and tornadoes, but typhoons in Japan were the most mind-blowing storms I have ever seen in real life-- and I lived up north away from the water, where they aren't even all that. Stay safe.)



Thanks Tereza! The actual storm is pretty mild here. We have a few mountains between us and the ocean.

It's more the secondary risks of flooding and landslides that cause problems for our area. We were very picky in choosing a neighborhood not in the hazard zones.
 
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These cyclones are massive electrical systems and their behavior is directly influenced by the electrical charge in our ionosphere due to solar activity and cosmic rays. Since this connection was made some years ago, there has been a lot of research on the direct biological effects these electric fields have and a number of things have emerged.

Instances of heart attacks increase. Chronic pain and other nervous system issues increase (your nervous system is electrical). Rates of depressive episodes, psychosis, and suicide increase (the brain is electrical). It is starting to emerge that autoimmune issues may also be more acute during these periods.

It's entirely possible that SOME symptoms experienced when barometric pressure drops may actually be triggered by the electric field conditions associated with the pressure drop.
 
Amy Arnett
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Nick Kitchener wrote:These cyclones are massive electrical systems and their behavior is directly influenced by the electrical charge in our ionosphere due to solar activity and cosmic rays. Since this connection was made some years ago, there has been a lot of research on the direct biological effects these electric fields have and a number of things have emerged.

Instances of heart attacks increase. Chronic pain and other nervous system issues increase (your nervous system is electrical). Rates of depressive episodes, psychosis, and suicide increase (the brain is electrical). It is starting to emerge that autoimmune issues may also be more acute during these periods.

It's entirely possible that SOME symptoms experienced when barometric pressure drops may actually be triggered by the electric field conditions associated with the pressure drop.



Thanks Nick! You bring up an important point, that barometric pressure is not the only variable associated with storms.

After years of SCUBA diving, I feel sensitized to pressure changes, so it was the most obvious to me. Having a "highly sensitive" nervous system, I often find that what I thought was normal for everyone is in fact a symptom of my "highly sensitive person"-hood.

A nervous system and sensory organs with lower than average thresholds for stimulation would be triggered by a wider range of environmental stimuli.
I'm always dimming lights, turning down the volume, noticing earthquakes first.

I once stayed in a vacation house where the AC unit would make a high-pitched whine when not in use. I ended up switching off the breaker.

Another aspect of storms I hadn't thought of is the noise. All that rain, thunder, and wind blowing everything around. Lots of sudden bangs and escalating gusts.
Prolonged loud noise exposure elevates stress hormone levels and can trigger flight, fight or freeze response.
 
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I also sometimes get sinus headaches during a big pressure change. I get them sometimes even when there is a change to high (and very dry in Utah) from low system moving in. That is really annoying, when everyone else is enjoying a gorgeous October day, and I'm down with a head splitter. I'm new to this site, so I dont know if its allowed, but the only over the counter meds I take for anything is Advil sinus for those pressure change headaches. I don't get any of the nasty side effects like other meds. But I do have to sign my life away buying them....breaking bad an all.

I used to get them a lot more when I lived in a humid climate in the great lakes region. High Altitude takes getting used to, but it has its advantages.
 
Amy Arnett
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Hi Daniel, welcome to Permies!

I agree that the changes in pressure are the trigger. I was fine all through our rainy season, which is pretty constant. But now that it's summer, the pressure is all over the place with thunderstorms and typhoons.

I'm new to this site, so I dont know if its allowed, but the only over the counter meds I take for anything is Advil sinus for those pressure change headaches.  



I think the only rule on this site is "be nice". I take advil and used to take sudafed when I lived in the states. Here I get a fun herbal powder from the pharmacy, recommended by the pharmacist. I think it contains the actual plant, ephedra.
 
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Yes there is also a rule here not to discuss "toxic gick" but that's more about GMOs and herbicides and stuff like that. I think common over-the-counter medicine can be discussed
 
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Adding my $0.02 (which is probably worth less than that ;) )

I'm sensitive to storms.. I get anxious, fidgety, pace more.. and get munchies - my body stocking up calories - a couple of days before /big/ storm fronts come through. The bigger/stronger the front, the more I react.

I've been able to stand out in severe weather and tune into and point out the direction/path of an F2 tornado 20 miles away, because of how it "felt" in that direction..


And sometimes I'll get asked "is there a storm coming? You're being a d!ck right now" when the anxiousness exhibits as a short-temper ... Friends recognize it in me, so I know it's not just my imagination.

Doctors - what do they know, anyway.. :D
 
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Barometric pressure drop/instability messes with my sinuses, arthritis, fibromyalgia, lupus, and old bone injuries - and it affects my mood & Makes me foggy(but, that could be at least partly because of the fibro & lupus, that are affected by it, too). My left eardrum has had a few injuries, resulting in ruptures, so I can actually feel the wobbles in pressure. It's kind of weird, and I used to tell my kids, 'look up - look for the lightning!' They thought it was magic, lol.
 
Amy Arnett
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Tom and Carla, Thanks for sharing!

Tom Shep wrote:
I've been able to stand out in severe weather and tune into and point out the direction/path of an F2 tornado 20 miles away, because of how it "felt" in that direction..



Carla Burke wrote: I can actually feel the wobbles in pressure. It's kind of weird, and I used to tell my kids, 'look up - look for the lightning!' They thought it was magic, lol.



Cool super powers! You both have honed your symptoms into cool abilities, which reminds me that there would have been a huge benefit to being able to predict storms in the days before weather forecasts, even still for tornadoes I would imagine. 

Your descriptions remind me of a paper I read years ago about the evolution of consciousness. It argued that consciousness was an adaptation to deal with all the information about our environment that brains receive. That is was easier and more productive to "get a feeling" about something than to feel every single triggered nerve ending.  
 
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Amy Arnett wrote:
Your descriptions remind me of a paper I read years ago about the evolution of consciousness. It argued that consciousness was an adaptation to deal with all the information about our environment that brains receive. That is was easier and more productive to "get a feeling" about something than to feel every single triggered nerve ending.  



Oh no. don't tell my wife I've evolved to become more productive. I'll never hear the end of it! :)

Seriously, though : I think it might actually be contagious - or at least learnable. 20 years ago she had no ability to sense storms or the like. Now when one's coming SHE feels them too, but looks to me to confirm "Hey. Is there a storm front coming? I'm feeling a bit odd today".
 
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I dislocated my shoulder in High School and can definetly tell when the barometer is dropping or rising, quite a bit more accurate than the local weatherman.
 
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Amy ~ Hi, regarding your Barometric Pressure Sensitivity, you might Google "vasomotor rhinitis" and see if the symptoms fit what you commonly experience (are you also a super-sniffer? do you pick up on smells that other people don't, or find yourself hypersensitive to "fumes", smell the diesel that's 10-cars ahead of you, etc? those are also characteristics of vasomotor rhinitis). Basically this is a bit like a human being gifted with some of the heightened sensitivity of a dog's nose. That's an exaggeration of course, but putting it in terms of maximum positive spin, so you can lean-in to it as a Super Power if vasomotor rhinitis proves to be what you have. The blood vessels inside the nose (for everyone) are Many and Sensitive and they are that way in order to responsively perform several respiratory system regulatory & protective functions. Swelling up is one such response and triggering the production of mucus is another.

People with vasomotor rhinitis are thought to have a more sensitive vascular network in the higher/deeper reaches of the nose. Perhaps this is due to having more of these little veins, or perhaps some are Larger, or perhaps the membrane walls are thinner/more sensitive. There can be subtly different structural "causes" from one individual to another. In my case, I discovered this diagnosis after years of searching for the root-cause of my barometric pressure triggered migraines. I noticed I'd get these horrible headaches whenever I Smelled Mold in the air (only later learned they were actually migraines). I went through a lot of extreme environmental purification of my home and yard, etc, to find and kill mold that I had concluded I must have been allergic to. But to no avail. Finally, I lucked upon quite an excellent allergist who rather quickly ID'd vasomotor rhinitis as the culprit (diagnosed this based on symptomology rather than tests per se).

I was prescribed Flonase which is now available OTC (though it wasn't at the time I started taking it). I really avoid taking drugs but am thankful that I did give the Flonase a try. To be effective it is best used as daily prophylactic not episodically, as it seems to work by toughening up the hypersensitive veins & membranes. Ten years later, this remains one of the very few pharma meds that I use. I was amazed by the dramatic difference Flonase made in reducing the frequency and intensity of the otherwise crippling migraines I will be hit with before/& during every big weather event or change in a major front. Of course, I'm still a little more sensitive than average to barometric pressure changes (& smells & chemical fumes) but this is toned down now into the "useful" level of weather prediction rather than producing crushing migraines or pressure headaches. So, even for those who are not big on pharma, if your discomfort is enough to be life-limiting or the headaches are truly mind-numbing then Flonase might be worth a try. I'd give it a month to 6-wks of daily use though, before passing judgment on efficacy.

And if you do conclude your symptoms fit vasomotor rhinitis, the next time you're out with the dogs you can give them a knowing wink & nod as you now have a bit of insider insight into the world of data they're constantly slurping up through their extraordinary noses 24x7 (still thousands of parts per million more sensitive than ours... as we humans with SuperSniffers just get a little taste of what it's like to be Born with a Dog's Nose!)
 
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I'm running out the door, but wanted to post a quick reply and say thank you for posting this. I am terribly affected by pressure changes, and being in the SF Bay Area that means constant weather/pressure changes. Slightly runny/stuffy nose, headaches (pressure and mini-migraines) and just a general feeling of fogginess, sometimes anxiety. I used to use flonase a lot but it never really helped enough to make it worth it. At this point when it gets bad enough and I go a couple nights in a row unable to sleep well or through the night I'll take a couple benadryl. I don't like to but sometimes I just have to sleep...

In September we took a two week vacation in Northern Idaho, I lived there in the 80s and still know people and I am considering moving back when I can figure out how. 2 weeks NOT feeling sick! A few days in I turned to my husband and was just like..."wow, I feel so good, I can breathe, I can sleep, I don't feel foggy or like I'm in a fishbowl."

I'm sure it's more than just the pressure, this place is just full of toxins in the air as well as noise pullutions. But it was nice to know I am not crazy, this place (the SF Bay Area) really is making me sick.
 
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My husband and I are oppositely sensitive to weather changes.  When the weather is damp, I feel fantastic and he's down with a headache.  As soon as it gets dry, he's fit as a fiddle and I'm quickly miserable.  I always prefer to get things done on a cloudy day.  I don't know what pressure, high or low, corresponds to those weather patterns and I've been meaning to look into it as a possible predictor of headaches for both of us.
 
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Norma Guy wrote:My husband and I are oppositely sensitive to weather changes.  When the weather is damp, I feel fantastic and he's down with a headache.  As soon as it gets dry, he's fit as a fiddle and I'm quickly miserable.  I always prefer to get things done on a cloudy day.  I don't know what pressure, high or low, corresponds to those weather patterns and I've been meaning to look into it as a possible predictor of headaches for both of us.


Definitely look into it, you sound like you both are reacting.

I have something I wrote up about barometric and health issues someplace else that I keep meaning to clean up and put here, it's more what exactly you are looking for, how to look it up on the net etc. I'll put it on my notes, maybe I'll remember to do it :D
Staff note (Pearl Sutton) :

Did it!!
https://permies.com/t/130152/Understanding-Weather-Effects-Physical-Mental

 
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Dull pain in the missing part of the thyroid like Travis and a sinus headache like Amy. So yes, it's a thing. Also it sort of runs in the family.
 
Pearl Sutton
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I posted my write-ups from another place about barometric pressure and fronts crossing here!  Understanding Weather Effects on Physical and Mental Health

:D
 
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I'm late to this thread, but I'm affected similarly to others--headache, fogginess, anxiety, plus a weird feeling when breathing (not exactly shortness of breath, but my lungs just feel weird and like they don't fit in my chest correctly).  I've already had very fast, strong pressure drops trigger panic attacks.  I'm also one of those people that's extremely sensitive to my own body processes and external stimuli--people are always telling me I'm nuts when I hear something they don't (like high-pitched noises or very low vibrations) or smell something (food going bad is a big one, or cooking/ environmental smells on clothing).  Wind is really rough, too, not only because of the noise but because of the pressure changes inside the house.  At least opening a window helps that.
 
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I feel the effects of barometric pressure extremes. I will feel it in my sinuses, and for big storms, I will often get a bloody nose. There is not much more to say. It's nothing new to me, it doesn't freak me out now that I know what causes it.
 
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So I have read all the posts but haven't noticed anyone with any symptoms of skin sensitivity. Any time there is a major change in weather with a huge drop or increase in temperature I get a hypersensitivity skin rash that always happens on my inner upper thighs. It is really annoying. I develop a rash and have to take Benadryl and topical hydrocortisone to help manage the problem.  I do feel it is like a superpower cause it starts happening anywhere from 24-48 hours prior to a major weather change. Has anyone else experienced this?
 
Amy Arnett
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Kristen Guerrero wrote:So I have read all the posts but haven't noticed anyone with any symptoms of skin sensitivity. Any time there is a major change in weather with a huge drop or increase in temperature I get a hypersensitivity skin rash that always happens on my inner upper thighs. It is really annoying. I develop a rash and have to take Benadryl and topical hydrocortisone to help manage the problem.  I do feel it is like a superpower cause it starts happening anywhere from 24-48 hours prior to a major weather change. Has anyone else experienced this?



Hi Kristen, Welcome to Permies!

That's an interesting symptom to be triggered by weather changes. My husband gets random rashes and hives with no discernible cause called urticaria. You may notice the similarity to the scientific name for nettles because the hives resemble having been stung by nettles. I was just reading up on urticaria and it did say that it could be triggered by high or low temperatures and pressure changes. I get it sometimes from heat, if I stay in the hot spring too long. Glad you are able to treat your symptoms:)
 
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My left eye waters whenever there is a big storm that moves in fast and moves out fast... my old hiking buddy used to get sick every storm.
 
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Hi! I’m so happy to find others with sensitivity to barometric pressure/weather! I experience headache, pressure in my ears, sometimes it triggers vertigo, which is awful! A lot of the time I just feel off balance similar to motion sickness. It can last for days and off and on for weeks which causes my anxiety to increase. I recently moved to Tucson and the monsoon season is a big trigger. I take Benadryl and it helps a little. I wish I knew what else could make that feeling go away, it drains me after a while.
 
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Hi,
I live in Colorado where the pressure varies all the time it seems. I am very sensitive to those changes and experience extreme muscle aches, sometimes head pressure where my eyes feel pressurized behind them and the worst symptom of all for me is depression. I want to leave Colorado and move to Florida where there is less days per year of barometric variation but it’s hard to convince my husband that this is real and it it’s making my life very challenging. I keep looking for research to back up the relationship between how I feel and that it is a real thing. Anyone out there know of any doctors or studies that will validate what I am saying? As of now, I think that people just look at me like I’m crazy when I describe this to them. I always feel way better at sea level. Fort Collins, Colorado is about a mile above sea level so I think that also has an impact on my symptoms.
 
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I get swollen sinuses just before a snow storm. Translates as a "headache." When it's really bad, feels like someone trying to poke my eyes out of my skull. Once it starts to snow? Waaaay better. I can feel thunderstorms, etc. too, but they aren't as bad, except perhaps just before a thunderstorm.

I think it's because I'm also allergic to dust mites. We live in a log home, full of ledges because of the way it was built/finished. We're fixing that, but slowly. It's expensive and finicky. (I also have sensitivities to most paints and solvents and waxes and most cleaners.) The allergies were one consideration when we bought the heat pump -- no blowing particulate or propane fumes, everything goes through a hepa filter at the source....

We moved here from Florida. I got headaches in the afternoon but after it rained, I was fine. Here? Here I have low-grade, chronic rhiniitus. The rest of it just aggrevates it.

Snow storms are the worst!
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I have that all the time. It gets me b4 peoe can notice the weather change. I know we are about to get overcast a day prior because I feel dizzy, nauseated and I feel pressure in my eye cavities. Many people called me crazy and it is due to ignorance.
 
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Im SUPER sensitive to this! I call what i feel in my head the " wub-wubs" because it feels and sounds like that.
My equalibrium is all out of whack, nausea, vomiting, etc
Does anyone else experience this??
 
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anathea chavez wrote:Im SUPER sensitive to this! I call what i feel in my head the " wub-wubs" because it feels and sounds like that.
My equalibrium is all out of whack, nausea, vomiting, etc
Does anyone else experience this??


Welcome to Permies! I get that one a lot. In me that's the barometric pressure affecting my chronic sinus issues. When my sinuses feel okay to me, but they do that with barometric changes, I cut out dairy again, as it's mucous forming, and blocks up the deeper sinus cavities causing that kind of wub wub type reaction.
My face was shattered in a car wreck when I was 18, I am very used to your wub wub feeling, and the inner ear imbalance that makes me throw up etc. My upper sinus cavities cannot drain properly, so the pressure changes makes them act like they have even more fluid in them.

Quoting a long write up I did on this Understanding Weather Effects on Physical and Mental Health

A visual for what happens in the body: the bursa in the joints are fluid filled bags that pad the joint, kind of like a balloon. As the pressure outside falls, the bursa swells to match it, effect is like a balloon getting bigger, so the joint can’t move as well and that hurts. As the pressure goes back up, it shrinks back down, hurting less.

 
Sinuses that block up work just like the bursa in the joints, when the pressure goes up and the fluid can't move anywhere, it presses on the inner ear, which affects your balance, and the nausea etc comes from that too.


 
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All the symptoms that you describe I feel them when it rains , I am so glad you talk about this I thought I was going crazy.
 
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Maria Telmont wrote:All the symptoms that you describe I feel them when it rains , I am so glad you talk about this I thought I was going crazy.



Hi Maria, Welcome to Permies! Thank you for sharing your experience.


Katy Mar wrote:Hi! I’m so happy to find others with sensitivity to barometric pressure/weather! I experience headache, pressure in my ears, sometimes it triggers vertigo, which is awful! A lot of the time I just feel off balance similar to motion sickness. It can last for days and off and on for weeks which causes my anxiety to increase. I recently moved to Tucson and the monsoon season is a big trigger. I take Benadryl and it helps a little. I wish I knew what else could make that feeling go away, it drains me after a while.



Diane House wrote:Hi,
I live in Colorado where the pressure varies all the time it seems. I am very sensitive to those changes and experience extreme muscle aches, sometimes head pressure where my eyes feel pressurized behind them and the worst symptom of all for me is depression. I want to leave Colorado and move to Florida where there is less days per year of barometric variation but it’s hard to convince my husband that this is real and it it’s making my life very challenging. I keep looking for research to back up the relationship between how I feel and that it is a real thing. Anyone out there know of any doctors or studies that will validate what I am saying? As of now, I think that people just look at me like I’m crazy when I describe this to them. I always feel way better at sea level. Fort Collins, Colorado is about a mile above sea level so I think that also has an impact on my symptoms.



And a belated welcome to Katy and Diane! Thank you for sharing your experiences.

I lived in Florida for five years and I remember less barometric symptoms overall, but hurricane season had a lot of big ups and downs.

I came across this video in a series where people write in autism/aspergers questions and around 4:30 is a question about feeling air pressure changes, like when closing the last car door.



Dr. Tony Atwood has a lot of experience with aspergers/autism and his videos are a great resource for validating lesser known symptoms/traits. I was diagnosed this year with autism and adhd, and it explains so much including my barometric pressure and other sensory sensitivities. I still haven't found any research specifically on this subject yet, but it seems to be common knowledge in the autism community. Parents of children with more severe presenting autism seem to report symptoms and behavior worsening around bad weather.

Of course there are many potential causes of weather sensitivity. It was nice to hear a doctor saying, yes people can feel pressure changes and it can be painful for them and we have to listen to and believe their experience.





 
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I have yr same symptoms with the addition of a hot flash, diaphragm tightens so difficult to breathe, and palpitations. They last 2 -10 min. Recently they are back to back. Having one now. Like every 20 min. I have a bad tooth abscess and its about to storm.. so Its really bad. Please help..they are as scary as they are debilitating.
Called EMS EKG good BP 120/73, O2 93%  so I dont know and they dont either.
.
 
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Jaye Adams wrote:I have yr same symptoms with the addition of a hot flash, diaphragm tightens so difficult to breathe, and palpitations. They last 2 -10 min. Recently they are back to back. Having one now. Like every 20 min. I have a bad tooth abscess and its about to storm.. so Its really bad. Please help..they are as scary as they are debilitating.
Called EMS EKG good BP 120/73, O2 93%  so I dont know and they dont either.
.



Welcome to Permies, Jaye! and thank you for sharing your experience. I'm sorry that your symptoms are so alarming, sounds almost like a panic attack.

I have what I call "floppy heart" or random palpitations. When I wake up from a nap, someone knocks on the door, I was breathing funny, laid on my back for too long, breathe out just right, too much coffee or ephedra and my heart goes all floppy with palpitations. It runs in my family so I was aware of it early on, and doctors have mentioned that it is probably "sinus arrhythmia", which is changes of heart rate when breathing in and/or out and isn't too serious. It's also the kind of thing that never shows up for the doctor. One thing they sometimes do is give the patient a portable ekg to wear for 24 hours to see if they can catch it. It may be worth asking your regular doctor about it if these symptoms are interfering with your daily life.

If I didn't know what it was, it would be very scary. I would think my heart is about to give out, and I'm sure my diaphragm would tighten from the anxiety. To kind of reset my heart, I hold my breath for about ten seconds and then breathe out all the way for 8-10 seconds. That seems to work for me most of the time, sometimes it takes a few repetitions.

Another detailed thread about physical effects of barometric pressure: https://permies.com/t/130152/Understanding-Weather-Effects-Physical-Mental

Your blood pressure is as low as mine. Sometimes I get a palpitation just from standing up if my pressure is low that day. The body struggles to readjust to the change in height of the heart relative to the rest of the circulatory system and triggers faster heartbeat to try and catch up the blood to the brain. My eyes also grey out for a couple seconds. If this sounds familiar, you may look into POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome).

A thread about treating low blood pressure: https://permies.com/t/119696/kitchen/treating-blood-pressure

Combined with an abscess, that sounds very stressful! Hope the storm passes and you feel better soon!

This thread might be helpful to you, it's about all kinds of ways to treat tooth pain at home while you wait for an appointment:
https://permies.com/t/143169/personal-care/purity/reduce-pain-broken-tooth-waiting
 
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Jaye Adams wrote:I have yr same symptoms with the addition of a hot flash, diaphragm tightens so difficult to breathe, and palpitations. They last 2 -10 min. Recently they are back to back. Having one now. Like every 20 min. I have a bad tooth abscess and its about to storm.. so Its really bad. Please help..they are as scary as they are debilitating.
Called EMS EKG good BP 120/73, O2 93%  so I dont know and they dont either.
.


HUGS! I have been there. What helped me was taking magnesium, low Mg does a lot of those symptoms by itself, mixing it with barometric is really painful. If you have any, take it. Natural Calm and epsom salts are both Mg. Take an Epsom salt bath if you can, that will help a lot of ways. (Don't drink it, it'll make you live in the bathroom for a day!)
A quick list of foods high in Mg, try eating some if you have them:
Pumpkin Seeds, Spinach, Swiss Chard, Soybeans, Sesame Seeds, Black Beans, Quinoa, Cashews, Sunflower Seeds, Beet Greens

A trick for the diaphragm spasms is muscle rub on all the way around your body, about 6 inches above and below the bra line (or where it would be if you don't wear bras.)

You have heard "take a deep breath" but what works better is blow OUT a deep breath, exhale as much air as you can, since you are spasming don't push yourself to the cough stage. You'll inhale deeply naturally, inhaling is easier than exhaling. Do it three or more times, it gets the stale air out and lets fresh air in. What that will do is help calm down the panic, because when you are panicking you tighten up and hold your breath, which makes it all worse.

You need to get to a dentist and get the abscess dealt wit,h it's making all of it worse. Complicated reasons why, but trust me, it is.

You can get your Magnesium levels tested, get the type of test called RBC Magnesium, it's red blood cells, not serum, gives a better idea of how much Mg your body can use.
If you need to, Request a Test does them https://requestatest.com/magnesium-rbc-testing

HUGS HUGS HUGS! Breathe, get your teeth dealt with, get Mg into you, and get tested, but I bet you are low.
Wish there was magic anyone can offer, but this is the best that can be done over the net.
HUGS HUGS HUGS

 
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