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Rose clippings

 
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I have 30+ rose's so I have a lot of rose clippings.   Should I put them in the compost pile, or burn pile?  I know they will compost, but wondering if it will take for ever to brake down.  Some times I put the pedals in the compost, and the woody part in the burn pile, but that is a lot of work.  So I'm interested in what other people do.
 
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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30!!!

I have 10 and that seems like a lot sometimes.  There are only three that need serious pruning and I throw those prunings on top of a ongoing brush pile along the branch to the creek...I don't like them in my compost as the thorns stay thorny and painful for so long.

Many times I prune and make cuttings for friends but that does not use up all the bits and pieces.

My favorite is a Gallica that we dry petals from for tea and medicinal uses.  It does not have the hooked thorns that the Rosa Van Fleet does.
I don't know the names of all of the others....one is a rosa ragosa I grew from seed though.

I've learned to be diligent about clean up while pruning as I like to go barefoot.....

What varieties do you have?
 
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Speaking with my 'herbalist' hat on, I'd use them, in so many other ways, and it would be rare for them to end up in either a compost or burn pile. If you're willing and have time, you could turn them into a cottage industry or three: selling dried buds &/or petals, fresh flowers, & with a tad more time, rose water, rose oils, etc. They're amazing for so many things! As to answering your original question... I'm sorry - I'm useless, on that one.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Carla, You are so right, there are so many lovely things to do with the buds and blooms and hips!

Usually pruning here is after they are done blooming though and to thin the canes to prevent humidity related problems, etc.   By then, the canes are pretty rough looking so I can't think of any good use?  

When we had goats it seems like they ate them along with other brambles but I might be misremembering that and it was probably just the leaves.

 
pollinator
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Location: South of Capricorn
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We have a local public access tv show here every Sunday, "farm tv" kind of thing aimed at local producers. Just recently profiled a large-scale rose farm, where the trimmings were composted. It wasn't clear whether that compost was used on the roses again or on other plantings (which I might imagine might be important).
The farmer removed as many petals as possible to dry and use as a by-product, and apparently didn't chip the canes but rather used heavy equipment to turn the compost and they got crushed in that process.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Thanks.  I guess I could use the wood chipper. I never even thought of that.
 
Tereza Okava
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For me, the chipper is always the answer!!!
(best thing about my home office- today to take a break I went outside to chip mulch for an hour. #permielife)
 
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