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Best blender?

 
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My wife and I have broken two old blenders by making things like chimichuri (a lot of fiber), and ice cream (frozen fruit). One of them was an old oster brand that was made of glass. What is the best blender as far as durability and non-toxicity go?
Even if it is made of glass or stainless steel, they all seem to have plastic somewhere. Maybe there is something out there that is more commercial grade?
 
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I'm waiting for our blender to die to get a Waring. We had one growing up, it always worked great even chopping ice, and if memory serves me correct my mother took it in the divorce. It was an early 70's model, and had decades of use, but I am not sure if it's whereabouts today or if it ever died.

Here's the one I'm eyeing when the plastic one we have kicks the bucket. I like it because it's simple: off, low and high, no variable speeds or pulsing. This one has a glass container with a handle. https://www.amazon.com/Waring-Commercial-BB900G-40-Ounce-Container/dp/B00197DWZI/ref=asc_df_B00197DWZI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167155690034&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7661835403811119548&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9013622&hvtargid=pla-305919857909&psc=1
 
pollinator
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Michael H.,     Is it just the glass container that is broken?....These can be replaced at Amazon.com :  https://www.amazon.com/Oster-5-Cup-Glass-Square-Blender/dp/B000JEMUPA

I love my old 80s (70s?) Osterizer (in the old 'avocado' color!) which is still kicking.  I'm thinking if the motor dies, I just find a place nearby that will re-do the motor windings.  We also have a Vitamix 7500..a powerful brute that dims the house lights when turned on.  The V-mix really pulverizes when needed, but the Osterizer is sheer engineering wizardry....cleaning the container is sooooo much easier due to the removable base.  Amazingly, one of the mom and pop hardware stores in town still sells the rubber O-rings for mating the base to the container.  Otherwise, Warings are what we actually use in the laboratory......they are built like a brick sh*@house and the stainless steel canisters come in myriad configs.  Good luck!

Edited to add....It is more common these days to find restaurant supply places even in average sized cities....they often have a great selection for perusing before buying.
 
Michael Holtman
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John Weiland wrote:Is it just the glass container that is broken?



No, the innards caught fire. I may see if I can just find some old parts blenders to keep one going.
The plastic and/or rubber parts are something I'd like to avoid if possible. I don't mind stainless, but I don't want cheap stainless that will leach large amounts of chromium. I figure a small amount is tolerable since it is a trace mineral. We mostly use glass skillets even, taking a stainless one on trips. Honestly, I am more worried about city water and pvc pipes than any thing else.
 
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Started on fire?
Or released some smoke?

I built a peddle powered generator using a tredmill motor.
It puts out wild DC. The faster you peddle the higher the voltage.

It runs the osteriser real well.
Well the actual motor works well with it.
Making peddle powered malts, it released it's smoke.
When I opened it up the contacts were vaporised.
I bought a DC switch and tried again, this time they welded together.
So I made a contact/switch using flattened 3/8" copper tubing.

They made paper with it, it got warm but kept going.
Sooo the motor isn't the weak spot on an osteriser.
 
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If you want to spend big bucks, get a Vitamix.  They are virtually unbreakable and can do stuff no other blender can do.  But they aren't cheap.
 
Michael Holtman
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I haven't taken it apart yet. I can probably fix it. When I do replace it, I would hope to find something better. I am looking into all the sujestions here.
 
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I love my Oster beehive. The only plastic on it is the lid, and the base that holds the metal blade on the jar. There's a rubber gasket.
https://www.amazon.ca/Oster-Classic-Chrome-Beehive-Blender/dp/B0089HUQQO/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?keywords=oster+beehive+blender&qid=1566051200&s=gateway&sprefix=oater+beehive&sr=8-4

I've had it for probably about fifteen years now. For most of that time I was a raw foodist and my blender saw serious use. I probably used it three times a day on average - lots of frozen fruit and greens for me, hummus and pesto for my husband, soups, sauces, nutmilks, everything.

It's not like a Vitamix where you can just throw everything in and turn it on. You have to add your ingredients in a logical order, use the pulse to get chunky or thick stuff moving before flipping it on all the way, etc. But it's also a tiny fraction of the cost of a vitamix.

I've gone through three blades over its life. Seems like they seize up after a while. The blades cost about three bucks to replace. Lots of Oster parts are interchangeable, which I like too.

I rave about my blender like I'm getting paid for it all the time. It's been a serious workhorse for me. I really, really like it :)
 
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Probably 15 years ago I bought a VitaPrep, which was Vitamix's professional version.  It lasted maybe 12 years, which I guess is pretty good.  I hear that there are 20 and 30 yr old Vitamix blenders still going strong.

Now I have a Vitamix, purchased at Costco, and it's fine.  We bought a stainless steel container for it, for a plastic free experience.  This is an expensive route, though.

If you could find an old Vitamix in good shape, that would be an excellent purchase.  I think the best bet would be estate sales.  
 
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The older (stainless steel) Vitamix was (is?) awesome. Mine lasted 13 years of daily use, making bread, grinding flour, cooking soups, and making ultra smooth purees and smoothies.  It's self-cleaning, too. Mine would have lasted longer, but  someone unthinkingly put a dinner knife in the dirty container to soak.   When I I turned it on, there was an awful noise, and the machine met its end.
Yes, they are expensive, but if you can find one with a stainless steel container they are so worth it. Super long warranty (seven years!), too.
 
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If you have the money I highly recommend a robocoup. They are widely used in the catering industry. You can often find them for sale second hand on auction sites for closed businesses. I've been a chef for 11 years and I've never killed one. Can do everything. You can grind coffee beans in them, blend large ice cubes to dust, sugar that has been cooked to hard crack can be turned into nougatine. Etc...etc... Unkillable motors in them. The blades can be replaced but I've used a 15 year old blade in one kitchen Nd it was still sharp enough to finely cut herbs without bruising.

https://www.nisbets.co.uk/robot-coupe-r2-bowl-cutter-with-free-discs/t226?vatToggle=incvat&gclid=1&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIyr-08MCh5gIVmpntCh3rBAdFEAQYASABEgLkw_D_BwE&cm_mmc=PLA-_-1665275020-_-63901013906-_-T226&cm_mmca1=go_1665275020_63901013906_321523756480_pla-599979253385_m_
 
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We have a vitamix we snagged at the dump. We waited and used it and used it and used it and when we gave up on our magic mill, we finally broke down and bought a grain jar for it. I also have an old Bosch universal food processor but it needs a special attachment I didn’t buy to mill grain.

So, yes I like it, we use it.  We got it cheaply. Vita mix does sell reconditioned machines, but those aren’t cheap either. If you know someone with a restaurant, you could tell them you’d be interested if they’re replacing theirs or try a restaurant supply store maybe? I wouldn’t have bought this one new, but we have it now and I’m glad!

Link for the reconditioned machines. Sorry, thought I’d included this.

https://www.vitamix.com/us/en_us/browse/s_Reconditioned+blenders/
 
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Emilie McVey wrote:The older (stainless steel) Vitamix was (is?) awesome. Mine lasted 13 years of daily use, making bread, grinding flour, cooking soups, and making ultra smooth purees and smoothies.  It's self-cleaning blender for ice cream, too. Mine would have lasted longer, but  someone unthinkingly put a dinner knife in the dirty container to soak.   When I I turned it on, there was an awful noise, and the machine met its end.
Yes, they are expensive, but if you can find one with a stainless steel container they are so worth it. Super long warranty (seven years!), too.



Yes, I have also used Vitamix for many years. I like to use it to stir nuts such as cashews and peanut butter. I made butter (dairy) and cold fruit dessert. I like to treat myself and life well.

have a nice day!
 
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I have a Blendtec, and it's a workhorse-- still going strong several years in, and we often use it multiple times per day.

It's comparable in price/functionality to a Vitamix, but I like the lower profile of it a bit better.

I do believe high-powered blenders are usually worth the investment, though. They do so much more than your standard models.
 
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