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Growing Pomegranates with Natural Plant Nursery

 
garden master
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I wanted to make this thread to help me keep track of and document my pomegranates.

Hopefully it can be helpful to others also!
 
Steve Thorn
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This pomegranate tree was planted last Fall and has been doing well despite getting chewed down to the ground by rabbits during the winter.

It was in a really wet spot, and pomegranates along with most fruit trees, like well draining soil. I decided to keep them in their existing spot and mound up the soil around them to create a drier area for them to grow.

I dug around the pomegranate and broke up the soil with a shovel and then piled it up against the tree to make a mound around it with the tree at the center. Depending on the degree of moisture in your soil, you can make the trench deeper and mound higher to make it drain even better. This pomegranate was in a pretty moist spot so I made it pretty high. I probably could have made it even higher but didn't want to spend too long building it.

I usually like to cover the mound with a shredded or whole leaf mulch, which creates a layer of rich organic matter to help build soil fertility. With it being summer, I didn't have a lot of leaves available at the moment, so I cut down some wild bushes and chopped up the cuttings and used them as a mulch.

You can also use this to convert a grafted fruit tree into an own root fruit tree. Pomegranates usually are grown on their own roots, since they propagate easily from cuttings, so I didn't have to do it for this tree. I have an apple tree that I did this for, and I wounded it right above the graft so it should send out new roots from the fruiting variety and become an own root fruit tree.

I built this soil mound about a month ago, and I planted some squash a week later on the mound to both help hold the soil in place and to use the available growing area.

Here's a video of before and after with general information on the process.

 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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This pomegranate has really been thriving and enjoying the raised mound it's now growing on!

It's only been one month since creating the mound, and it has almost doubled in size and put on a whole lot of new growth, and the leaves look really healthy!

The squash plants on the mound are only 3 weeks old, and they are taking off too and really enjoying the spot!

 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
271
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Here's an update for the pomegranate growing on a mound. It has really taken off with lots of side shoots growing and a new main shoot that is growing vigorously and has lots of side shoots coming off from it.

A lot of people say to prune off these new shoots, some call them watersprouts, but I like leaving them, as they are a source of new and very vigorous growth, that will form the new framework for the plant next year!
Close-up-of-new-vigorous-pomegranate-growth-(watersprout).jpg
Close up of new vigorous pomegranate growth (watersprout)
Close up of new vigorous pomegranate growth (watersprout)
Happy-pomegranate-growing-on-a-mound.jpg
Happy pomegranate growing on a mound
Happy pomegranate growing on a mound
 
Steve Thorn
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This is a video update similar to the pictures above with a more in depth look at the existing growth and the new vigorous shoot.

 
pollinator
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Do pomegranates need to be kept to one main stem to grow tall? My Azerbaijan pomegranate has stayed like a small bush but I want it to grow into a proper sized tree.
 
gardener
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Tim Kivi wrote:Do pomegranates need to be kept to one main stem to grow tall? My Azerbaijan pomegranate has stayed like a small bush but I want it to grow into a proper sized tree.



How tall we talking?

The one producing pomegranate in my town is a bush, with many equal stems. It is something like 12 to 14 feet tall.
 
Tim Kivi
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My gardening store writes that it grows up to 6 metres (about 20 feet). But it's hard to imagine from looking at it grow!
 
Steve Thorn
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Tim Kivi wrote:Do pomegranates need to be kept to one main stem to grow tall? My Azerbaijan pomegranate has stayed like a small bush but I want it to grow into a proper sized tree.



Having more than one main stem shouldn't affect the height. With more stems, it just may take longer to reach that height though, but it should have a larger total canopy size and fruit production area with multiple stems.

From what I've seen, pomegranates seem to want to grow like a bush. I wanted one I had a few years ago to grow like a tree at first. I pruned off all the lower branches, and I think it may have had a negative impact on the cold hardiness and health of the pomegranate. It had a lot higher dieback during the winter after the pruning and didn't grow back very quickly. I'm near the northern end of the range of pomegranates though, so it might not have as many negative effects for someone in a warmer climate. From what I've seen recently though, plants seem to be more healthy and productive when grown closest to their natural growing form, so I try to mimic that as closely as possible.

 
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