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Acorn prep failure

 
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So the wife and I tried to prep acorns by the boiling pot method.  We kept moving and draining for over 2 hours.  The water always turned tea color.  I'm thinking we may have a variety that has way too much tannis in it  Any suggestions?  Thanks.


Will
 
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Shell them, put them in the water tank of the toilet in a net bag. Each time you flush, the water will be changed. May stain the bowl. After a few days/weeks they shouldn't be bitter anymore.
 
pollinator
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My favorite method is to shell the acorns, then dry the halves or pieces in the sun till hard, then grind to grits or flour consstency in a blender, then leach by putting this into a colander with some fabric underneath and let leach with cold water in a sink with dripping faucet or outside with a hose near a thirsty plant.  Ready in one day, at least for my white-oak group acorns.  Red/black oak might take longer but certainly not over a couple of days.
 
William Pass
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They are now a dark brown color.  They started to get mushy and I was afraid they would turn into a slurry.  I read different methods, but none of them talked about this outcome.  Don't they loose nutrients when boiled so much?
 
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There was an extensive answer on this a year or two ago. I will post the short answer. Red oaks is what I have and they are rich in tannins.

Shell them. Usually a good bang on their nose frees them best.

Boil them whole. Never put the heated ones into cold water. Always change hot water to hot water.  What I found through research and education is add a little bit of calcium carbonate, clean would ash, or some baking soda to the mix to really pull out the tannins. If you live by the shore, maybe you can find some sea shells. The idea is a safe, naturally occurring in some waters anyway base will bind with the acids.  This made my waters turn fast. After a while I got it down to mild versus severe tannin quantity. I then ground it. Letting it sit overnight or dry once ground further helped mellow the flavor . It was never sweet. Always a little bitter,  but I added it to a cookie recipe and everyone enjoyed it.  Anyway, many foods have some tannins, you just don't want a lot so your body can absorb the proteins and stuff.  That's my 2 cents. Btw, tried the drying and grinding methods and wasn't pleased with how it worked on my acorns.  Good luck!
 
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