Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

DIY coconut coir?

 
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
26
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have some dried coconut husks that my little buddy from the village brings me. I'm currently throwing them into the garden as is, or burying them in the bottom of tree planting holes to hold moisture at the roots. But I'm interested in shreading for a finer mulch or making coconut coir.

The problem is, the DIY videos I've seen make it look like it just pulls apart. It doesn't. Some pieces do, but not most. And for the little bit of dust I can collect, it's not enough.

I'm wondering if I can try to pulverize it with a sledge hammer (which I don't have) or rock (which I do have)? Any benefit to making it wet first? Chop it with a machete first? I've already tried, but my machete was pretty dull, and now it's broken, so I'm waiting for a new one.

Would appreciate any pointers. I should be able to get basically unlimited coconut coir if I can figure out how to harvest it.
 
gardener
Posts: 6251
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1012
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Soak the husks first, you want them to be fairly well saturated, then place them on something solid that won't break easily and use a board or ball bat to beat the daylights out of the husks.
Once you have done that, the fibers should be easy to pull apart, if they haven't done so during the beating of the husks.
 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
26
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'll try that! Thanks. Maybe I'll hire my little buddy to do it! :) He should enjoy getting paid to hit things. Kinda a boy's dream! Haha
 
pollinator
Posts: 244
41
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
“Come on Marge, it’s fun to smash things!” - Homer Simpson
 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
26
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tim Kivi wrote:“Come on Marge, it’s fun to smash things!” - Homer Simpson



Exactly. Ha.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 8709
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
714
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those that have been driven on after a rain, readily come apart. Soak in black barrel in the sun. After they are cooked and saturated, put them on the driveway and stomp or roll over them a few times.

Then squeeze out the water and leave on driveway until sufficiently dry.
 
I didn't like the taste of tongue and it didn't like the taste of me. I will now try this tiny ad:
Dave Burton's Boot Adventures at Wheaton Labs and Basecamp
https://permies.com/t/119676/permaculture-projects/Dave-Burton-Boot-Adventures-Wheaton
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!