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Growing your own vegetarian diet

 
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Hi am thinking of going mostly vegetarian for convenience reasons. One is that butchering goats and sheep takes about 3 hours of work and we dont have much shade where we live. I was wondering what foods I should grow to give me a complete diet. I was thinking moringa and legumes for protein. squash for fiber. Sweet potatoes in summer and potatoes in  fall and spring. What vegetables should I consider  growing. the growing season is about 10 months and I have alot of space to grow. What plants contain alot of fat vitamins and minerals
 
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As a long time vegan, I suggest growing a range of legumes and beans, including peas, beans for eating in pod, and for drying to make soups/stews and soybeans for edamame. Also, tomatoes and lots of dark leafy greens such as kales, spinach, chard. Lots of root vegetables of all varieties are also a great idea for filling starches with a variety of nutrients. You could also trial options like peanuts, chufa, other kind of nuts/berries for added nutrients. Depends I suppose if you’re thinking of more annuals or perennial crops. Lots of options for a full-range, nutritious and satisfying plant-based harden.
 
Alexander Gomez
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Thanks for replying. I've also been doing research on google. I want to grow at least 50% of what  I eat and I feel like if I included eggs in my diet it would allow more garden space for other foods. I also read once about grafting tomatoes onto potato plants to double production

Do you have any more suggestions on greens I could grow. I think peppers are high in vitamin c and spinach is high in iron.
 
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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When people ask me what they should grow, I have a few standard responses....
.....grow what you like to eat and will eat.
.....grow what will grow in your situation.
.....grow as much variety as you have room and time to do.

I have seen people grow lots of some particular veggie, but they don't really like eating it. So the end up giving the excess away, feeding it to their chickens, or throwing it into their compost pile. When I lived in New Jersey, it was zucchini. It was not uncommon to come home from work to find a bag of zucchini at the front door. Here in Hawaii, it's often bananas.

Grow what will grow in your climate and soil without going through contortions. Where I live, squash is difficult to grow, but so many people still devote a section of their gardening space to squash. It fails year after year.

Grow variety. I have a neighbor who is fixated on green beans and pumpkins. That can become a boring diet real quickly.

If my garden is going to be a major part of my food (and it actually is because I produce most of my own food), I would grow some surefire crops, but also lots of small plantings of this and that for variety. Variety not only addresses boredom, but also adds various nutrients that a restricted diet fails to provide.
 
Alexander Gomez
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Thanks for the advice. I think I'll start more with sweeter crops like bell peppers and I might grow a mix of things. I had originally thought that I should focus more on what I need to with variety coming second
 
Alexander Gomez
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Update. Just bought a sweet potato from the grocery store  and planted the slips. They are growing well. I'm not looking for a harvest just to see if they can grow before the frosts of January. I have 6 tomatoes giving fruit. With 9 on the way to ripening. the bell peppers I planted arent doing so well as the irrigation over there broke
 
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