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Failed Fish!

 
master pollinator
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I consider myself fortunate in that I live along the coast, so when certain fisheries are in season, we can get fish at reasonable prices. This week it is salmon. So we bought some.

It is against the law of all of humanity to cook salmon in a kitchen stove, so we got out the charcoal grill, wrapped the salmon up in tinfoil, poured on the olive oil, butter, salt and pepper, and of course pure maple syyrup. Then we grilled it up.

FAIL!

I never pokd holes in the tinfoil, so while the salmon was perfectly cooked, it did not gt the charcoal smoke flavor! Drat! Drat! Drat!

Oh well, it was a great autumn meal anyway. Fresh salmon, homemade coleslaw, and this being September in Maine, apple crisp straight off the ole apple trees.


 
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I remember the first time I did salmon on the grill that way.  A big ol slab of silverbright on a Weber kettle.  25 years later and it's become standard.  I'm on the eastern shore md, and we go crazy when rockfish season comes.  It is good cooked the same way.
 
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Nothing better than maple syrup, lemon juice, soy source, and fresh dill for a glaze.

My wife might drive to the ocean tomorrow and get a coolor full of salmon and stuff.  If so it'll be salmon for dinner and will smoke the rest on Friday.

OK so now I'm hungry...
 
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Sometimes salmon is $15 a pound at the grocery store and sometimes you can buy a whole fish for $10 from somebody who is catching them. That's when you realize that $100 per year to run a freezer, isn't so expensive after all.
 
Bob Anders
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80% of our power is solar.  Our AC and fridges and freezers are all 48 volt.  Between the rabbits, beef, and pork that we butcher there running anyways.  
 
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Maple syrup on fish??!! Must be one of those weird North American things like having bacon & eggs swimming in a pool of it ... sheez!!

I'm a 'fish Nazi' - cooked which ever way people like it: grilled, fried, steamed, poached, etc, but with absolutely minimal stuff on it. Pepper/salt tolerated. Personally, prefer to savour the flavour of the different species without all the gooey sauces, dressings and gravies people tend to load on them.

However, if you enjoyed it and made you happy, then mission accomplished!

 
Dale Hodgins
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I had one of those electric grills with the burner spaced too far apart so that it would cook too much in one area and not in another. Corn husk and tassel helped with this. It spread the heat out and imparted a sweet smoky flavour, reminiscent of fire roasted corn.

They aren't going to start doing this in fancy French restaurants, mostly because corn is cattle food in Europe , but also because there are probably better ways. Works in a pinch.
 
Travis Johnson
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Ed Belote wrote:I remember the first time I did salmon on the grill that way.  A big ol slab of silverbright on a Weber kettle.  25 years later and it's become standard.  I'm on the eastern shore md, and we go crazy when rockfish season comes.  It is good cooked the same way.



There are several fisheries that are in season right now. There is Salmon of course, but Pollock is in season as well. I like it, a cheap fish, but tastes a lot like Haddock when cooked right. Lobster is in season too, and is at its lowest price of the year because it is in season, yet the tourists are gone, so the price tumbles. Obviously the same is true of Crab. We almost bought Crab Cakes because they were only $1 per Crab Cake, but our kids do not like crab. Clams and mussles are always in season, but this is when they are at their lowest price. Tuna is in season too I think, but I could be wrong, it has been awhile since I went Tuna Fishing.

Scollops will be in season soon I think, with sea urchins and shrimp coming in season later in the winter.


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