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Rocket stove that has no emissions?

 
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The image on the left shows the top view of the rocket stove with the circle the chimney coming towards you.  The picture on the right is the 3d image.  You close off one of the holes at the base of the rocket stove, and once the fire is burning well, you open the entrance that is 90 degrees to the one with wood burning.  Once that is open the fire in the chimney inverts and burns inside the rocket stove.  Why does it do it?  Because if you look at the 3d image, you can make hexagons out of the 2d image of the 3 prong image.  If you have a hexagonal lattice, the fire is able to turn around and go back to its starting point.
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rocket stove
rocket stove
 
pollinator
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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I'm not sure what you're trying to do with this. Have you built and run a stove with your design?

A stove, by its very nature, has to have some sort of emission. Right?
 
Ted Butrell
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It would theoretically on start-up, but that could be reduced.  It does work though.
 
Su Ba
pollinator
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For a rocket stove to burn, it must bring in fresh air. That volume must go somewhere, thus emissions.

You say "theoretically". Does that mean you haven't tested your theory yet? Why not give it a try and see what happens. Experimenting can be fun.
 
Ted Butrell
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The idea is that if a vortex is created inside the stove and there's a hexagonal lattice, the vortex pulls everything in and travels back to its starting point, so all three are open in the end, but only one entrance and chimney are open at first, but right there is a critical point for efficieny
 
Ted Butrell
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Let's assume you have a wheel connected to a drill to spin at high speed to start the fire.  The "wheel" or drill bit has on its surface mounds like mountains of a same size mountain in a single row of mountains (same-sized) encricling the drill bit's surface.  That's key.  It spins parallel to one of the openings, the other opening is closed.

Due to the mounds, air splits at the base of each mountain it hits, going left or right, forming a vortex.  Now open the other entrance.  Now air is going to spin around each mountain in a loop on the drill bit.  Now it's definitly not sucking air into the stove because it's travelling in a close loop around each mound on the spinning drill bit's surface.  At this point, I believe it's charging, and that both entrances and chimney could close and then it would actually build a charge at the start from the spinning, and it should burn with the chimney and 2 entrances closed for some time because it's building potential energy.  In fact you might be able to do that with the air without a fire in it, and then light the fire closed. ---- update: ok.  I think that the spinning thing is not necessary, but having the first entrance open and the other closed creates a vortex, then both entrances open charges, so you alternate having one or both entrances opening with a timing mechanism.
 
Ted Butrell
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I thought about it, and you're wondering what would happen if you don't close the chimney but say close it halfway.  That slows down the fire.  But the intake at 90 degrees to the main tube going to the chimney provides variation, because that tube will start a vortex that provides variation to the main vortex.  When it slows down, the one at 90 degrees picks up the slack so it actually doesn't slow down.  So you can gently close the chimney, and it will run sucking from both intakes (the 90 degree intake provides variation to the main sucking)
 
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With all due respect:  What is the problem you're trying to solve with this design?  A "normal" rocket stove has relatively few emissions, after it gets going.  Are you proposing that your design would somehow have fewer emissions?

What is the net gain of your design?
 
Ted Butrell
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The stove having two entrances at 90 degrees going into the chimney, splits the air in half (which creates a vortex).  So the benefit is that you get a natural vortex, but you do need the chimney open and the two entrances open.  If you split air left and right you get a vortex.  Also, natural variation in the fire maintains the vortex whereas an electric motor with a spinning mounded wheel would require constant variation to maintain a vortex.  So that makes me wonder if you can cap the chimney, because a fire by nature has variation (flickering), and if you assume the chimney is capped and there's a vortex inside sucking air, then the fire would maintain the variation to keep it going, so long as you're splitting the air (two entrances at right angles).  So I think that would work.  So what if it's correct that you have the chimney open then slowly close the chimney (by creating a smaller hole I think it would have to be a telescoping hole that shrinks to a central small hole).  By slowly closing the chimney, the speed increases which is what generates the energy to start the vortex.  Also, if you want a vortex, you'd want the two entrances or fire boxes to be cylinders.
 
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Whenever you plan to make this and try it out, be sure to have carbon monoxide monitors going at all times. I don't see how you will eliminate CO emissions, especially during startup and shut down of the system. Experimenting with combustion in a closed environment can be deadly. I'm a researcher by trade and enjoy experimentation, but you just need to make sure that all safety features are in place for all the things that can and many times will go wrong. Nothing wrong with having things not work because that's how we learn, but you don't want to have it be your last mistake.
 
Ted Butrell
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I used to make a rocket stove out of bricks outdoors, but this could be made outdoors to ensure it works.  If there's a vortex inside, it should suck strongly from the two entrances even if the chimney is closed at the end, but the chimney has to be telescopically closed to a central small hole that then becomes closed as the speed increases as the chimney hole gets smaller.
 
gardener
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If you close down the exhaust to nearly nothing, you will not get the flow moving enough faster to maintain the volume rate. Friction through a small opening or duct increases dramatically with speed, and you will simply choke the flow.
 
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