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What type of grass?

 
Posts: 112
Location: Appalachian Foothills-Zone 7
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Anyone know what type of grass this is?  It dominates my pasture.  Browns out in the winter.  Doesn't like to be mown short.  Seems a little like bermuda, but it pulls out very easily and the runners are much finer.  The seed heads are also very fine and feathery as seen in the pic.  They goats and sheep eat plenty of it, but it is not their favorite.  
image.jpeg
[Thumbnail for image.jpeg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 176
Location: Henry County Ky Zone 6
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I think it is Nimble Will. I have a lot of it this time of year. It is said to be very fiberous warm season grass. I have not been able to find out much about it. My sheep don’t like it. I rotate pastures but am thinking I may have not rested them enough for more palatable species to out compete it.
Hopefully someone on here will know much more about it.
 
Gray Henon
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Kris schulenburg wrote:I think it is Nimble Will. I have a lot of it this time of year. It is said to be very fiberous warm season grass. I have not been able to find out much about it. My sheep don’t like it. I rotate pastures but am thinking I may have not rested them enough for more palatable species to out compete it.
Hopefully someone on here will know much more about it.



That's it!  Thank you! I have wondered about for years!  I've never even heard the name, but after looking at some more pictures online, it really is everywhere.  I can't find much about its nutritional content, but my animals seem to do well enough on it.  I'm thinking a cow may graze it down more and open up more room for other grasses and clovers.  My soil ph is low at around 5.8.  I'm curious to see if liming will give the other grasses/legumes a leg up as well.
 
Kris schulenburg
pollinator
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Let us know if lime works. I think horses eat it because we didn’t notice it until we sold them. It is good to know cows will eat it.
 
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Gray Henon wrote:

Kris schulenburg wrote:I think it is Nimble Will. I have a lot of it this time of year. It is said to be very fiberous warm season grass. I have not been able to find out much about it. My sheep don’t like it. I rotate pastures but am thinking I may have not rested them enough for more palatable species to out compete it.
Hopefully someone on here will know much more about it.



That's it!  Thank you! I have wondered about for years!  I've never even heard the name, but after looking at some more pictures online, it really is everywhere.  I can't find much about its nutritional content, but my animals seem to do well enough on it.  I'm thinking a cow may graze it down more and open up more room for other grasses and clovers.  My soil ph is low at around 5.8.  I'm curious to see if liming will give the other grasses/legumes a leg up as well.



Yeah liming will make a world of difference when the PH is that low. You can use wood ash too, but it takes a lot of it, and it lacks the magnesium that real lime has.

Your nitrogen does not look too bad. Your grass has a bit of a yellowish tinge to it, but I did not see any inverted vee coloring upon the leaves even when it blew up the picture. The yellow tinge might just be because of the time of year it is too though. And I did not see any purple coloring to indicate your phosphorus is low either. I think if you limed the field the plants would pick up the NPK that is available, and use it.
 
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