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Fruit trees in yard that has full shade in early Sept

 
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Hi,
Large part of my yard has full shade starting early Sept.  But the area has full sun from spring to summer.

What kind of fruit trees I can plant? I am in zone 7.

Thanks
 
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Location: Chicago
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Paw paw?  It likes some shade.  Also sour cherry.
 
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Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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You might look at persimmon also. Not sure the zones for it.
 
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Location: Appalachian Foothills-Zone 7
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Welcome aboard!  What's casting the shade?  

Also, adding a general location (in addion toyour zone) to your profile can help us give you more appropriate answers!
 
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Mk Neal wrote:Also sour cherry.



I had forgotten sour cherry can tolerate some shade. I will put a few more in in my north facing shady slope.  You can never have too many Morellos!
 
Kate Smith
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Re: “what is casting the shade”

The back of the yard is uphill slope that has tall trees which casts shade starting late summer/early fall.

I didn’t know persimmon can tolerate shade.

Is peach going to be ok as the fruits already picked before that part of the yard becomes shady?
Thanks
 
wayne fajkus
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Kate Smith wrote:

I didn’t know persimmon can tolerate shade.



I had read somewhere that it is an understory tree. Of the 2 I have the one getting partial shade is doing a whole lot better than the one getting full sun.
 
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Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
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I think.plums would do well.  There is a small grove of plum trees that came with my place, under the shade of a couple big doug firs.  They only get a little bit of sun all year, yet they produce delicious plums copiously.  A little too well, in fact, I can never keep up with them in July/August.
 
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It also depends on how tall the tree will get. It will reach for the light as it gets older, and when it's young it will probably be fine with the September shade; it'll just go dormant sooner I imagine.

I would aim for trees that ripen in summer, like summer plums and early apples (yellow transparent, for example). That way they have the sunlight for sugar when they need it. Trees developed for short growing seasons would also do well I imagine (St. Lawrence Nursery's stock, for example)
 
Kate Smith
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“Jonathan Baldwerm wrote:
only get a little bit of sun all year, yet they produce delicious plums”

This is music to my ears!  I was planning to have plums and then realized the sun situation.  Now my tree options are wider than I thought as long as the fruits are ripened early to mid summer.

Thanks everyone for the valuable input! Much appreciated.
 
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Location: Fairplay, Northern California
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My nurseryman says that trees are on the "decline" as the year wanes.  They are getting ready to go dormant so don't require the amount of sun they did when in active growth.

I say, try at least one "full sun" tree and see what happens. One you grow from seed won't cost you anything.
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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wayne fajkus wrote:
I had read somewhere that it is an understory tree. Of the 2 I have the one getting partial shade is doing a whole lot better than the one getting full sun.



I am just about to plant a persimmon.  I think I will get another and plant it in the shade of an old chestnut and then I can compare the two.  Thanks for that tip, Wayne.
 
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As someone said - it's likely not such a big problem since the trees are going dormant then anyway.

I grow all my garden in the midst of a 50+ yr. old forest (very tall pines, oaks, madrones, fir trees) and nothing gets more than about 3 hrs. of sun a day in summer (some get nothing in winter because of a big hill to the south). I get wonderful apple crops, and Italian prune, asian pear, cherry, everbearing Illinois Mulberry, and fig crops.  I planted english walnut, filberts, paw paws and a persimmon that have not gotten old enough to bear but are looking great. Some things have taken a long time to start fruiting - like two of the first apples I planted - took 7 yrs. but now give me wonderful crops.  I have pomegranate, and hardy kiwis that are now starting to bear well, and grapes that bear well -but took 7 years to get started.  

I just try stuff.  Blueberries are my biggest disappointment - only the Sunshine Blue variety will give me any fruit to speak of. They must just need a lot of sun to bear.  But I can't tell you all the 100's of types of plants I grow that experts say need "Full Sun" - that do just fine here. Some may not bear as well (or as young) as they would in full sun - but they do just fine. They give me "enough"....   :-)
 
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