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dry stack step

 
master steward
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
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Jocelyn shows us a lot about dry stack in a small project.  This is a new josiah video!

 
pollinator
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Location: Ozarks
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So nice to have flat rocks for building. Here's a pic of the rocks here in the Ozarks. They go all the way up to boulder size.

The only flat ones we have are limestone which breaks really easy. Not strong enough for much of anything except decorative.
I've got quite a few of the boulder size popping up out of the ground which do add visual interest. Moss and other things grow on them. The loose ones or ones that get dug up will get used for a rubble wall. They'll have to be stacked in a triangle fashion, point up or at least have a good lean into the dirt side. I'm going to use them to prevent top soil loss. I need to get a builder's level or transit so I can get some visuals. I plan to get an old one with no electronics so it will be around forever. The A-frame level wouldn't work too well as I'm going through forest. With the builder's level/transit, I can stand in one spot and scope out a path. If I run into a big tree, I can just go up or down slope a little and start a new path in a matter of seconds.
 
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You guys did a really great job. You did it really well, used all the proper steps (pun intended) that I could think of, and captured it all in a great video.

Again, nice job.
 
paul wheaton
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Thanks Travis!

I think the important parts are:

  - excellent drainage

  - 2 over 1 and 1 over 2

  - smaller rocks and gravel behind and underneath to make for perfect rock placement

  - loads of small gravel and sand on top will, in time, work in and stabilize the whole top

And the best part:  it was 100% free.  We have mountains of rocks (this is the rocky mountains) and we have a spot that has loads of sand.
 
No. No. No. No. Changed my mind. Wanna come down. To see this tiny ad:
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