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RMH on a boat?  RSS feed

 
Burra Maluca
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I've just had someone ask me if a RMH would work on a boat. I guess it would depend on how big the boat was and how much mass you used, but I've really no idea.

Can someone give me a few pointers?
 
Ernie Wisner
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Well it should and the mass would have to be down low. I am going to be working on a variety for boats but haven't started yet. I do have a design for a boat sized pocket rocket at this time. I think that the boat RMH will have to be a 6 inch system that burns very hot so you could get rid of trash by using it for fuel and get a clean burn. this is an area that i think those little pyrolisis things for making biochar might work really well.
those are a small system that may prove to be a good way to get rid of trash on board if it can handle plastics. so the answer is not yet but i will work on it.
 
Erica Wisner
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The main issues I see will be:

1) Mass load: must be low and centered; ballast.
2) Air supply - boats can have ventilation problems, absolutely no smoke or CO must be allowed to build up in enclosed spaces. The heater will help mitigate mildew, but the air supply to the compartment where it is located must be worked out well.
3) Water: the logical place to install a mass heater is also the natural location of bilges. Earthen materials might not be suitable, or need to be oiled to the point of becoming linoleum.
4) Firestopping: the hull and bulkheads, and any combustible materials nearby, must be well protected from heat.

Similar in some ways to a basement build.
With the added quirk that your fuel supply may be Gyre trash, sun-dried kelp, and old rope.

Might be worth using hot water as mass, or engine cooling water as thermal source, rather than an earthen mass heater.

We are also thinking about how to do "passive solar" on a boat, especially given that you have reflected cool light (more visible and UV, not quite as much heat) and direct full-spectrum light to work with.
Ventilation would be a great application for passive solar boat design.

-Erica
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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