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Belgian fence  RSS feed

 
Brad Davies
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Location: Clarkston, MI
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Does anyone have any experience with creating, building, or maintaing a belgian fence? I am thinking about incorperating one into my fedge that I am putting in this spring. I have found some info on the net, but was curious if anyone on here had some info they could share.

Thanks!
belgain fence.jpg
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espalier-fence-l.jpg
[Thumbnail for espalier-fence-l.jpg]
 
Alison Thomas
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No I don't but isn't it beautiful. I could be interested in that too.

I've seen folk do a similar thing with willow but nowhere near as solid and elegant looking.
 
Jason Matthew
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What kind of trees are those? I've only ever seen that done with fruit trees, but I guess any would work.

 
Mike Dayton
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Location: sw pa zone 5
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Here is some information that was posted on another permiculture site. It is a great site and I found this information very interesting. You can use alot of different types of trees to try this with. The process takes years, so alot of patients is needed to make these things work. The end results are pretty amazing though. I was thinking about making a Gazebo type structure with an open type of roof. The trees grow together with time, and you can graft some sections to speed things up a bit. I don't know how much this process has to do with permiculture because it almost seems to be against nature, but the end products are pretty neet.


http://www.worldsstrangest.com/drb/living-growing-architecture/






I think you should do it.
 
David Good
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Probably willow trees, there. It would certainly be fun to try.
 
Brad Davies
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Jason Matthew wrote:What kind of trees are those? I've only ever seen that done with fruit trees, but I guess any would work.



I'm not sure about those specific one's, I got those pics from google images, but everything I have read has been about doing it with apples or pears or both.

Mike Dayton wrote:http://www.worldsstrangest.com/drb/living-growing-architecture/


I think you should do it.


Holy crap!! Those are some of the coolest things I have seen in my life. Thanks Mike, now I know what I'll be doing for the next 30+ years..........

I'm pretty sold on doing it, probably about 80' worth, just trying to make sure I got it planned properly first.

My main question is how do I go about grafting to a dwarf root stock. Do I order the root stocks then graft before I plant, or plant the root stocks and graft later? I would like to put in as many varieties as I can, it will be along the western wall of my house.

 
Mike Dayton
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I would plant the trees and get them established befor grafting. Make sure the roots have taken hold befor you graft. You can train existing branches the way you want them to grow, or you can gradt on a branch where you need one. Both ways will work. Trees are pretty frexible and will take any shape you choose for them. Haveing 2 trees toughing will let them eventually grow together. Good luck with your new project.
 
Katy Whitby-last
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There is a great book called "Tricks With Trees" which is all about how to do this sort of thing.
 
Brenda Groth
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when reading it check out the two links at the bottom, hobbit houses and architecture..wow...wow..wow
 
John Sizemore
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Location: West Virginia/ Dominican Republic
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I am looking gat the idea of buying dwarfing root stock for the trees I would like for the Belgian fence. Then after it is up I could graft the varieties I want on top. I am finding the root stocks for under $1.50 each in bundles of 100.
All in all it should make for a great level of production.
 
Alison Thomas
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John Sizemore wrote: I am looking gat the idea of buying dwarfing root stock for the trees I would like for the Belgian fence. Then after it is up I could graft the varieties I want on top. I am finding the root stocks for under $1.50 each in bundles of 100.
All in all it should make for a great level of production.


What a great idea John! Much cheaper than going and buying all the fruit trees 'ready made'.
 
Tim Crowhurst
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I may try that with gooseberry bushes. One problem my parents have long had is a tendency for their bushes to produce more fruit than they can physically support, resulting in broken branches - one even snapped off at the base! A Belgian fence, with the branches grafted rather than just woven together, would be able to support much more weight.
 
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