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Use for tea-light candle shells

 
Roman Milford
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Has anyone found a use for the leftover aluminum shells after tea-light candles have burnt out?
I have a lot of them saved up, seems a waste to throw them out in the recycling.
 
John Polk
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Wind chimes? Perhaps they would scare the birds off if you hung them in fruit trees?

 
Marla Kacey
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Location: Wyoming Zone 4
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I refill them. I use a nail and a thread spool to open up the little hole in the wick holder, insert a new wick, and refill the little tins.
 
Carolina Hecht-Nielsen
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Location: Escondido, Southern California
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I've used them as cookie cutters to make perfect little round sandwich cookies. We put fruit preserves in the middle.
 
Denise Lehtinen
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I was reading in the ERE book (I think it was the book) that Crisco was originally intended as candle oil.

Seems like a really cheap and easy thing to do to refill the empties with Crisco and a wick and reuse them indefinately.

(I'm not claiming to have done this...but I can't see how it wouldn't work.)
 
John Polk
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Crisco was originally formed as a way to solidify oils for the purpose of making soap.
It burns quite well with a wick.

 
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